INTRAPERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ACTIVE, RURAL, LATINO YOUTH

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157322
Type:
Presentation
Title:
INTRAPERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ACTIVE, RURAL, LATINO YOUTH
Abstract:
INTRAPERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ACTIVE, RURAL, LATINO YOUTH
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Perry, Cynthia K., PhD, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:box 357262, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Co-Authors:Beti Thompson; Brian E. Saelens
PURPOSE: To ascertain the intrapersonal and environmental factors which are associated with middle school aged youth being physically active in a rural and predominantly Latino community.
BACKGROUND: The majority of middle school-aged youth are not sufficiently active to achieve health benefits, such as weight control. Rural and ethnic minority youth are even less likely to be active. Determining factors that differentiate physically active from more inactive Latino and rural middle school-aged youth could inform strategies to increase physical activity in this underserved population.
METHODS: Middle school students (50% boys; 80% Latino) in a rural Pacific Northwest community completed surveys administered in school (n=1102) regarding physical activity, barriers and facilitators (e.g., park use, physical education (PE) time), and other health behaviors. Based on survey responses, youth were divided into two groups -active (participated in 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity 5 or more days a week) and inactive. Chi Square analyses examined active versus inactive group differences in intrapersonal and environmental factors.
RESULTS: Thirty six percent of youth reported being active for 60+ minutes on 5 or more days a week, with 20% reporting exercising 60+ minutes 7 days a week. Active youth reported more often attending PE 5 days a week (78% versus 56%, p= .000), participating in any type of after school activity at least one day a week (63% versus 45%, p=. 001), and playing on a sports team (school or recreational league) (32% versus 23%, p= .001). Active youth are more likely to report that a team (28% versus 17%, p = .000) and coach (43% versus 31%, p= .000) were motivators of more physical activity but other motivators (e.g. family, friends, park quality and access) did not differentiate between active and inactive youth. Active versus inactive youth did not differ on gang participation, carrying weapons, or use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs. Walking, instead of being driven, to parks (62% versus 54%, p= .012) and engaging in physical activity when at parks (85% versus 80%, p= .033) were associated with being active; however, the number of parks used and frequency of using them were not associated with being active. Having adults in the neighborhood that youth could talk with was associated with being active (60% versus 51%, p= .005); feelings of safety in and liking their neighborhood did not differ between active and inactive youth. Unlike national studies or studies among mostly Caucasian youth, age and gender were not associated with being more active.
IMPLICATIONS: Making PE available 5 days a week and creating opportunities for youth to be involved in after school activities and sports teams or organized physical activity programs could increase the number of middle school aged youth who meet the recommended 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on at least 5 days a week. School nurses can advocate for schools to offer daily PE to all students throughout the school year. Additionally, school nurses, perhaps in collaboration with physical education teachers, could organize and direct after school physical activity programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleINTRAPERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ACTIVE, RURAL, LATINO YOUTHen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157322-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">INTRAPERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ACTIVE, RURAL, LATINO YOUTH</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Perry, Cynthia K., PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">box 357262, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">perryc@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beti Thompson; Brian E. Saelens</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: To ascertain the intrapersonal and environmental factors which are associated with middle school aged youth being physically active in a rural and predominantly Latino community. <br/>BACKGROUND: The majority of middle school-aged youth are not sufficiently active to achieve health benefits, such as weight control. Rural and ethnic minority youth are even less likely to be active. Determining factors that differentiate physically active from more inactive Latino and rural middle school-aged youth could inform strategies to increase physical activity in this underserved population. <br/>METHODS: Middle school students (50% boys; 80% Latino) in a rural Pacific Northwest community completed surveys administered in school (n=1102) regarding physical activity, barriers and facilitators (e.g., park use, physical education (PE) time), and other health behaviors. Based on survey responses, youth were divided into two groups -active (participated in 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity 5 or more days a week) and inactive. Chi Square analyses examined active versus inactive group differences in intrapersonal and environmental factors. <br/>RESULTS: Thirty six percent of youth reported being active for 60+ minutes on 5 or more days a week, with 20% reporting exercising 60+ minutes 7 days a week. Active youth reported more often attending PE 5 days a week (78% versus 56%, p= .000), participating in any type of after school activity at least one day a week (63% versus 45%, p=. 001), and playing on a sports team (school or recreational league) (32% versus 23%, p= .001). Active youth are more likely to report that a team (28% versus 17%, p = .000) and coach (43% versus 31%, p= .000) were motivators of more physical activity but other motivators (e.g. family, friends, park quality and access) did not differentiate between active and inactive youth. Active versus inactive youth did not differ on gang participation, carrying weapons, or use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs. Walking, instead of being driven, to parks (62% versus 54%, p= .012) and engaging in physical activity when at parks (85% versus 80%, p= .033) were associated with being active; however, the number of parks used and frequency of using them were not associated with being active. Having adults in the neighborhood that youth could talk with was associated with being active (60% versus 51%, p= .005); feelings of safety in and liking their neighborhood did not differ between active and inactive youth. Unlike national studies or studies among mostly Caucasian youth, age and gender were not associated with being more active. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Making PE available 5 days a week and creating opportunities for youth to be involved in after school activities and sports teams or organized physical activity programs could increase the number of middle school aged youth who meet the recommended 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on at least 5 days a week. School nurses can advocate for schools to offer daily PE to all students throughout the school year. Additionally, school nurses, perhaps in collaboration with physical education teachers, could organize and direct after school physical activity programs. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.