2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157324
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CORRELATES OF SPOUSE ADJUSTMENT IN RECURRENT OVARIAN CANCER DYADS
Abstract:
CORRELATES OF SPOUSE ADJUSTMENT IN RECURRENT OVARIAN CANCER DYADS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Ponto, Julie A., PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, AOCN
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:5416 Nicklaus Drive NW, Rochester, MN, 55901, USA
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between demographic, illness, illness appraisal and dyad resource variables in dyads that had experienced recurrent ovarian cancer. BACKGROUND: Living with recurrent ovarian cancer is life-changing for women and their spouses. An insidious disease, ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and 75% of women diagnosed with Stage III or IV disease will recur within 22 months, resulting in prolonged or repeated treatment. Considering the average age at time of diagnosis, the spouse dyad is typically the most central family unit. Factors associated with adjustment to recurrent ovarian cancer are inadequately addressed in the literature and studies generally fail to include spouses. An understanding of the relationship between demographic, illness, appraisal and resource variables and spouse adjustment will provide direction for future practice and research.
METHODS: A descriptive, correlation, cross-sectional design was used in a sample of 32 married couples who had experienced recurrent ovarian cancer. Network and snowball sampling was used to recruit dyads 21 years of age or older, able to speak and read English, and both willing to participate, from throughout the U.S. through national cancer advocacy organizations. Participants completed either an online or paper survey consisting of a demographic questionnaire and valid and reliable instruments. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Correlation analyses were used to examine relationships between spouse variables and survivor adjustment and survival variables and spouse adjustment.
RESULTS: A sample of 32 Caucasian couples was obtained. The average age of survivors was 61.5 (SD=7.6) and of spouses was 63.9 (SD=8.9). More than 50% were college educated. 41% of women had no known disease at the time of the study. 62.3% of women had experienced 2 or more recurrences. Poor survivor adjustment was correlated to lower spouse age (r=-.47, p<.05), greater spouse uncertainty (r=.39, p<.05), and higher spouse fear of recurrence (r=.60, p<.01). Poor adjustment in spouses was correlated with lower survivor age (r=-.46, p<.05), lower perceived marital quality (r=-.40, p<.05), negative survivor meaning of the illness (r=-.53, p<.01), poor survivor adjustment (r=.70, p<.01), greater symptom distress (r=.58, p<.01) and greater survivor uncertainty (r=.40, p<05).
IMPLICATIONS: This study demonstrates the interrelationship between recurrent ovarian cancer spouse dyads and provides support for an integrated family model of care for this population. Younger couples may be at higher risk for adjustment issues; early identification of these dyads at risk is imperative. More negative appraisal of the illness was related to adjustment in the other spouse and greater symptom distress was related to poor spouse adjustment. Nurses can influence women's symptom experience and reduce uncertainty potentially improving adjustment for these dyads. This research was supported in part by National Cancer Institute R25 grant (CA93831; PI: Kathi Mooney, PhD, RN); Winona State University; Sigma Theta Tau - Gamma Rho Chapter; Mayo Clinical Cancer Prevention and Control; Mayo Clinic Division of Nursing Research; the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition; and the Oncology Nursing Society.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCORRELATES OF SPOUSE ADJUSTMENT IN RECURRENT OVARIAN CANCER DYADSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157324-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">CORRELATES OF SPOUSE ADJUSTMENT IN RECURRENT OVARIAN CANCER DYADS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ponto, Julie A., PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, AOCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5416 Nicklaus Drive NW, Rochester, MN, 55901, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jponto@winona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between demographic, illness, illness appraisal and dyad resource variables in dyads that had experienced recurrent ovarian cancer. BACKGROUND: Living with recurrent ovarian cancer is life-changing for women and their spouses. An insidious disease, ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and 75% of women diagnosed with Stage III or IV disease will recur within 22 months, resulting in prolonged or repeated treatment. Considering the average age at time of diagnosis, the spouse dyad is typically the most central family unit. Factors associated with adjustment to recurrent ovarian cancer are inadequately addressed in the literature and studies generally fail to include spouses. An understanding of the relationship between demographic, illness, appraisal and resource variables and spouse adjustment will provide direction for future practice and research.<br/> METHODS: A descriptive, correlation, cross-sectional design was used in a sample of 32 married couples who had experienced recurrent ovarian cancer. Network and snowball sampling was used to recruit dyads 21 years of age or older, able to speak and read English, and both willing to participate, from throughout the U.S. through national cancer advocacy organizations. Participants completed either an online or paper survey consisting of a demographic questionnaire and valid and reliable instruments. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Correlation analyses were used to examine relationships between spouse variables and survivor adjustment and survival variables and spouse adjustment. <br/>RESULTS: A sample of 32 Caucasian couples was obtained. The average age of survivors was 61.5 (SD=7.6) and of spouses was 63.9 (SD=8.9). More than 50% were college educated. 41% of women had no known disease at the time of the study. 62.3% of women had experienced 2 or more recurrences. Poor survivor adjustment was correlated to lower spouse age (r=-.47, p&lt;.05), greater spouse uncertainty (r=.39, p&lt;.05), and higher spouse fear of recurrence (r=.60, p&lt;.01). Poor adjustment in spouses was correlated with lower survivor age (r=-.46, p&lt;.05), lower perceived marital quality (r=-.40, p&lt;.05), negative survivor meaning of the illness (r=-.53, p&lt;.01), poor survivor adjustment (r=.70, p&lt;.01), greater symptom distress (r=.58, p&lt;.01) and greater survivor uncertainty (r=.40, p&lt;05). <br/>IMPLICATIONS: This study demonstrates the interrelationship between recurrent ovarian cancer spouse dyads and provides support for an integrated family model of care for this population. Younger couples may be at higher risk for adjustment issues; early identification of these dyads at risk is imperative. More negative appraisal of the illness was related to adjustment in the other spouse and greater symptom distress was related to poor spouse adjustment. Nurses can influence women's symptom experience and reduce uncertainty potentially improving adjustment for these dyads. This research was supported in part by National Cancer Institute R25 grant (CA93831; PI: Kathi Mooney, PhD, RN); Winona State University; Sigma Theta Tau - Gamma Rho Chapter; Mayo Clinical Cancer Prevention and Control; Mayo Clinic Division of Nursing Research; the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition; and the Oncology Nursing Society.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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