RURAL CHILDREN'S EXPOSURE TO WELL WATER CONTAMINANTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157326
Type:
Presentation
Title:
RURAL CHILDREN'S EXPOSURE TO WELL WATER CONTAMINANTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE
Abstract:
RURAL CHILDREN'S EXPOSURE TO WELL WATER CONTAMINANTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Postma, Julie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
Co-Authors:Tamara Odom-Maryon; Patricia Butterfield; Wade G. Hill; Philip Butterfield
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this paper is to report prevalence estimates from full well screens conducted on households enrolled in the "Environmental Risk Reduction through Nursing Intervention and Education" study, precautionary actions taken by parents, and feasibility and risk communication issues that arose during the course of the study.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
In May, 2009, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a policy statement recommending annual testing of private wells that supply drinking water to U.S. children. Implementing the recommendation will impact primary care settings and public health departments, whose personnel will be called upon for advice regarding testing, interpretation and mitigation. To elucidate contextual and logistical issues pertaining to the AAP recommendations, we report findings from the ERRNIE intervention study.
METHODS:
We collected data from 188 rural low-income households, inclusive of 320 children under the age of 7, who were recruited through local health departments and community settings. Participating families lived in one of two Western U.S. counties and received water from a well with less than 15 connections. Participants completed questionnaires addressing precautionary actions. Water samples were analyzed for multiple contaminants. Repeat testing was conducted on microbiological samples testing positive.
RESULTS:
Twenty seven percent of households tested positive for at least one contaminant, including total coliforms (18%), arsenic (6%), synthetic organic chemicals (6%), nitrates (2%), fluoride (2%), and E. coli (<1%). Eighty nine percent of households testing positive for total coliforms were positive at re-test. Greater levels of concern were expressed before testing in regards to bacteria and nitrates than for arsenic or lead. Respondents reported taking multiple precautionary actions, but only 31% had ever tested their well water. Higher levels of education, income, and age, as well as homeowner status, were significantly associated with previous testing.
IMPLICATIONS:
With the exception of arsenic, prevalence rates were low compared to national data. Recommendations for communicating abnormal results, mitigating risks, and overcoming logistical challenges are presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRURAL CHILDREN'S EXPOSURE TO WELL WATER CONTAMINANTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157326-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">RURAL CHILDREN'S EXPOSURE TO WELL WATER CONTAMINANTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Postma, Julie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jpostma@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tamara Odom-Maryon; Patricia Butterfield; Wade G. Hill; Philip Butterfield</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purpose of this paper is to report prevalence estimates from full well screens conducted on households enrolled in the &quot;Environmental Risk Reduction through Nursing Intervention and Education&quot; study, precautionary actions taken by parents, and feasibility and risk communication issues that arose during the course of the study. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:<br/>In May, 2009, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a policy statement recommending annual testing of private wells that supply drinking water to U.S. children. Implementing the recommendation will impact primary care settings and public health departments, whose personnel will be called upon for advice regarding testing, interpretation and mitigation. To elucidate contextual and logistical issues pertaining to the AAP recommendations, we report findings from the ERRNIE intervention study. <br/>METHODS: <br/>We collected data from 188 rural low-income households, inclusive of 320 children under the age of 7, who were recruited through local health departments and community settings. Participating families lived in one of two Western U.S. counties and received water from a well with less than 15 connections. Participants completed questionnaires addressing precautionary actions. Water samples were analyzed for multiple contaminants. Repeat testing was conducted on microbiological samples testing positive.<br/>RESULTS:<br/>Twenty seven percent of households tested positive for at least one contaminant, including total coliforms (18%), arsenic (6%), synthetic organic chemicals (6%), nitrates (2%), fluoride (2%), and E. coli (&lt;1%). Eighty nine percent of households testing positive for total coliforms were positive at re-test. Greater levels of concern were expressed before testing in regards to bacteria and nitrates than for arsenic or lead. Respondents reported taking multiple precautionary actions, but only 31% had ever tested their well water. Higher levels of education, income, and age, as well as homeowner status, were significantly associated with previous testing. <br/>IMPLICATIONS:<br/>With the exception of arsenic, prevalence rates were low compared to national data. Recommendations for communicating abnormal results, mitigating risks, and overcoming logistical challenges are presented.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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