MIND-BODY THERAPY IN WOMEN'S ADDICTION TREATMENT: FEASIBILITY AND ACCEPTABILITY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157328
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MIND-BODY THERAPY IN WOMEN'S ADDICTION TREATMENT: FEASIBILITY AND ACCEPTABILITY
Abstract:
MIND-BODY THERAPY IN WOMEN'S ADDICTION TREATMENT: FEASIBILITY AND ACCEPTABILITY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Price, Cynthia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Research Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Co-Authors:Betsy Wells; Dennis Donovan
BACKGROUND: A remarkably high proportion of women entering substance abuse treatment have a history of interpersonal violence, and risk of relapse among women is associated with vulnerability to interpersonal stress. This is a study of 'Mindful Awareness in Body-oriented Therapy' (MABT), a novel therapy delivered in women's addiction treatment. MABT is designed to facilitate emotional regulation and reduce avoidant coping and trauma symptoms, behavioral outcomes identified as important for relapse prevention in women. Primary elements of MABT include massage and body literacy to increase sensory and emotional awareness, mindfulness training to reduce avoidant coping, and body awareness exercises to teach skills for stress management.
PURPOSE: The primary two aims of the study are to examine: 1) recruitment and retention feasibility, and 2) MABT acceptability.
METHODS: The design is a 2-group RCT involving randomization to MABT plus usual care or usual care only. All participants were inpatients in a women-only addiction treatment center and eligibility required continued enrollment in the center's outpatient program. Assessments were administered at baseline, post-test (3), and 6 & 9 month follow-up. The MABT sessions were scheduled weekly for 8 weeks, each lasting 1.5 hours. The first MABT session was typically scheduled during the last week of a 3-5 week inpatient program and subsequent sessions were scheduled as adjuncts to the 8 week outpatient program. A satisfaction survey and written questionnaire with open-ended questions aimed at treatment experience were used to examine treatment acceptability. Analysis involved descriptive statistics and content analysis.
RESULTS: Sixty women were screened, and 46 were eligible for study participation. Reasons for ineligibility included change in outpatient treatment plan (7), current violent interpersonal relationship (4), and scheduling limitations (3). Forty five women enrolled and were randomized; there was no loss due to randomization. Using a 2:1 randomization ratio, 30 were assigned to MABT and 15 to usual care only. Twenty-five percent screened positive for PTSD; 80% reported childhood or adult sexual and/or physical assault. Two participants requested study withdrawal, one from each group. Of those randomized to MABT, 12 were discharged from, or ended, outpatient treatment: 8 due to substance use, 3 for financial reasons, and 1 due to lack of attendance. Receipt of MABT sessions was contingent on attendance in the outpatient program. Of the remaining 18, 16 completed 6-8 (75-100%) MABT sessions. The MABT group retention rate is typical of behavioral interventions in addiction research, indicating MABT treatment feasibility; the retention rate among participants not discharged from treatment indicates high treatment acceptability. The responses to post-test survey and questionnaire were also positive; participants perceived that MABT increased emotional awareness, and provided new tools for self-care that increased their capacity to cope with stress; newly acquired awareness and tools were perceived to reduce risk of relapse.
CONCLUSION: It is feasible to recruit and implement a practice-based randomized clinical trial of MABT in women's addiction treatment. The acceptability and perceived benefit of MABT is high. The clinical implication is that MABT is an acceptable complementary therapy to integrate into addiction treatment services for women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMIND-BODY THERAPY IN WOMEN'S ADDICTION TREATMENT: FEASIBILITY AND ACCEPTABILITYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157328-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">MIND-BODY THERAPY IN WOMEN'S ADDICTION TREATMENT: FEASIBILITY AND ACCEPTABILITY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Price, Cynthia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cynthiap@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Betsy Wells; Dennis Donovan</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: A remarkably high proportion of women entering substance abuse treatment have a history of interpersonal violence, and risk of relapse among women is associated with vulnerability to interpersonal stress. This is a study of 'Mindful Awareness in Body-oriented Therapy' (MABT), a novel therapy delivered in women's addiction treatment. MABT is designed to facilitate emotional regulation and reduce avoidant coping and trauma symptoms, behavioral outcomes identified as important for relapse prevention in women. Primary elements of MABT include massage and body literacy to increase sensory and emotional awareness, mindfulness training to reduce avoidant coping, and body awareness exercises to teach skills for stress management. <br/>PURPOSE: The primary two aims of the study are to examine: 1) recruitment and retention feasibility, and 2) MABT acceptability. <br/>METHODS: The design is a 2-group RCT involving randomization to MABT plus usual care or usual care only. All participants were inpatients in a women-only addiction treatment center and eligibility required continued enrollment in the center's outpatient program. Assessments were administered at baseline, post-test (3), and 6 &amp; 9 month follow-up. The MABT sessions were scheduled weekly for 8 weeks, each lasting 1.5 hours. The first MABT session was typically scheduled during the last week of a 3-5 week inpatient program and subsequent sessions were scheduled as adjuncts to the 8 week outpatient program. A satisfaction survey and written questionnaire with open-ended questions aimed at treatment experience were used to examine treatment acceptability. Analysis involved descriptive statistics and content analysis. <br/>RESULTS: Sixty women were screened, and 46 were eligible for study participation. Reasons for ineligibility included change in outpatient treatment plan (7), current violent interpersonal relationship (4), and scheduling limitations (3). Forty five women enrolled and were randomized; there was no loss due to randomization. Using a 2:1 randomization ratio, 30 were assigned to MABT and 15 to usual care only. Twenty-five percent screened positive for PTSD; 80% reported childhood or adult sexual and/or physical assault. Two participants requested study withdrawal, one from each group. Of those randomized to MABT, 12 were discharged from, or ended, outpatient treatment: 8 due to substance use, 3 for financial reasons, and 1 due to lack of attendance. Receipt of MABT sessions was contingent on attendance in the outpatient program. Of the remaining 18, 16 completed 6-8 (75-100%) MABT sessions. The MABT group retention rate is typical of behavioral interventions in addiction research, indicating MABT treatment feasibility; the retention rate among participants not discharged from treatment indicates high treatment acceptability. The responses to post-test survey and questionnaire were also positive; participants perceived that MABT increased emotional awareness, and provided new tools for self-care that increased their capacity to cope with stress; newly acquired awareness and tools were perceived to reduce risk of relapse. <br/>CONCLUSION: It is feasible to recruit and implement a practice-based randomized clinical trial of MABT in women's addiction treatment. The acceptability and perceived benefit of MABT is high. The clinical implication is that MABT is an acceptable complementary therapy to integrate into addiction treatment services for women.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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