USE OF INTUITIVE AND REASONED THOUGHT TO INFORM MAMMOGRAPHY-SCREENING DECISIONS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157330
Type:
Presentation
Title:
USE OF INTUITIVE AND REASONED THOUGHT TO INFORM MAMMOGRAPHY-SCREENING DECISIONS
Abstract:
USE OF INTUITIVE AND REASONED THOUGHT TO INFORM MAMMOGRAPHY-SCREENING DECISIONS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Purtzer, Mary Anne, Ph.D., R.N.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wyoming
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Dept. 3065, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY, 82071-2000, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study is to discover the process by which intuitive-dominant women use reasoned thought to make a more fully-informed mammography-screening decision. This study continues the author's inquiry regarding the mammography-screening decision-making process of rarely or never-screened women. The aim is to build on the theoretical model developed by the author in a preceding study that discovered that intuitive-dominant thinking provided a decision-making default for mammography-screening for rarely or never-screened study participants. Research questions include: (a) What are catalysts that interrupt intuitive thinking and trigger use of reasoned thought? (b) What is the process of resolution when discordance occurs between intuitive and reasoned thought? (c) What is the process for integrating intuitive and reasoned thought for a more fully-informed decision?
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. It is known that (a) mammography is an effective breast cancer screening tool, (b) treatment is most effective with early stage disease, and (c) impoverished women may not access this life-saving screening. Accordingly, the problem is underutilization of mammography screening resulting in significant health disparities for medically-underserved women.
METHODS: Grounded theory is being utilized as it is consistent with the focus on process. Sampling consists of an estimated 20 participants who are low-income, uninsured, and rural residents. Participants include women who have never or rarely screened as well as regular screeners and are recruited from clinics for indigent persons. In-depth interviews are being conducted with three to five recurring cycles of data collection and analysis per participant.
RESULTS: This study is in-progress and will be completed prior to the 2010 WIN "Nursing Science: Informing Practice and Driving Policy" conference. The result of the study will be an explanatory theoretical model of intuitive and reasoned thought processes involved in mammography-screening decisions.
IMPLICATIONS: The proposed research holds scientific merit in terms of the potential impact of new knowledge on the understanding of the mind and associated health behavior as related to health disparities and cancer control. Foundational to the importance and potential scientific merit of this research is gaining new understandings of medically-underserved women that typically have little voice in the scientific world. Study findings may also contribute to rural nursing theory. Nursing IMPLICATIONS: offer nurses new assessment content areas and educational possibilities to facilitate a more fully-informed, mammography-screening decision.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUSE OF INTUITIVE AND REASONED THOUGHT TO INFORM MAMMOGRAPHY-SCREENING DECISIONSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157330-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">USE OF INTUITIVE AND REASONED THOUGHT TO INFORM MAMMOGRAPHY-SCREENING DECISIONS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Purtzer, Mary Anne, Ph.D., R.N.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wyoming</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept. 3065, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY, 82071-2000, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mpurtzer@uwyo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study is to discover the process by which intuitive-dominant women use reasoned thought to make a more fully-informed mammography-screening decision. This study continues the author's inquiry regarding the mammography-screening decision-making process of rarely or never-screened women. The aim is to build on the theoretical model developed by the author in a preceding study that discovered that intuitive-dominant thinking provided a decision-making default for mammography-screening for rarely or never-screened study participants. Research questions include: (a) What are catalysts that interrupt intuitive thinking and trigger use of reasoned thought? (b) What is the process of resolution when discordance occurs between intuitive and reasoned thought? (c) What is the process for integrating intuitive and reasoned thought for a more fully-informed decision?<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. It is known that (a) mammography is an effective breast cancer screening tool, (b) treatment is most effective with early stage disease, and (c) impoverished women may not access this life-saving screening. Accordingly, the problem is underutilization of mammography screening resulting in significant health disparities for medically-underserved women. <br/>METHODS: Grounded theory is being utilized as it is consistent with the focus on process. Sampling consists of an estimated 20 participants who are low-income, uninsured, and rural residents. Participants include women who have never or rarely screened as well as regular screeners and are recruited from clinics for indigent persons. In-depth interviews are being conducted with three to five recurring cycles of data collection and analysis per participant.<br/>RESULTS: This study is in-progress and will be completed prior to the 2010 WIN &quot;Nursing Science: Informing Practice and Driving Policy&quot; conference. The result of the study will be an explanatory theoretical model of intuitive and reasoned thought processes involved in mammography-screening decisions.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: The proposed research holds scientific merit in terms of the potential impact of new knowledge on the understanding of the mind and associated health behavior as related to health disparities and cancer control. Foundational to the importance and potential scientific merit of this research is gaining new understandings of medically-underserved women that typically have little voice in the scientific world. Study findings may also contribute to rural nursing theory. Nursing IMPLICATIONS: offer nurses new assessment content areas and educational possibilities to facilitate a more fully-informed, mammography-screening decision.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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