2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157331
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PREDICTORS OF LIFE SATISFACTION IN PEOPLE 80 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER
Abstract:
PREDICTORS OF LIFE SATISFACTION IN PEOPLE 80 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Pusztai, Julie A., BSN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Loma Linda University
Title:PhD Student
Contact Address:West Hall, Loma Linda, CA, 92350, USA
BACKGROUND: A higher percentage of the U.S. population is living to advanced ages than ever before. Although embraced as desirable by most, living longer presents the challenge of maintaining a sense of satisfaction with one's life. The purpose of this descriptive
correlational study was to evaluate variables, including religiosity, that predict life satisfaction in a national sample of individuals 80 years of age and older.
METHODS: The sample was drawn from a multistage random sampling of persons 65 and older in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Medicare Beneficiary eligibility list that participated in the Religion, Aging, and Health Survey (Krause, 2001). From an original cross-sectional sample of 1500 participants who responded to face-to-face interviews, the subsample for the present analysis included 374 individuals: 144 men and 230 women; 190 Caucasian, 184 African American. Descriptive statistics were used to identify participantsÆ gender, race, and marital status, and to evaluate responses for the independent variables (IVs). A series of three stepwise regressions (SR) were used for this exploratory model building. The first SR entered 11 IVs found in the literature to predict life satisfaction (DV). Seven religion independent variables (RIV) were then explored in a second SR for ability to predict the DV. In a final SR analysis, those variables from the previous regressions demonstrating predictive ability of the DV were explored together for their power in explaining life satisfaction. An ANOVA was used in each step to test for model significance.
RESULTS: In the first SR, five IVs emerged as significant: quality of life (QOL), locus of control, financial burden, optimism, and health status. Collectively they explained 21% of the variance of the DV. In model two, three RIVs remained as predictors and explained 10% of the DV: forgiveness of others, forgiveness from others, and centrality of faith. The final SR included the five IVs and three RIVs to explore the combined predictive ability. Only optimism was excluded in the analysis. These seven IVs and RIVs collectively demonstrated the ability to predict 27% of the experience of life satisfaction. ANOVAs for all SR models were significant (p < .001). QOL was shown to be the most powerful predictor at 12% (Beta = .23, p = < .001). Three RIVs were entered and remained in the final model adding 5% to the collective ability of the IVs studied for their effect on the DV.
IMPLICATIONS: Results suggest that while multiple factors previously identified in the literature proved predictive of the experience of life satisfaction in older persons, enhanced predictive power is provided by including spiritual variables. As spiritual aspects of interpersonal forgiveness and centrality of faith contributed significantly to the predictive ability of the model, this study offers support to areas of research and practice that explore the usefulness of these experiences in understanding and supporting life satisfaction in older persons.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePREDICTORS OF LIFE SATISFACTION IN PEOPLE 80 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDERen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157331-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PREDICTORS OF LIFE SATISFACTION IN PEOPLE 80 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pusztai, Julie A., BSN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loma Linda University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">West Hall, Loma Linda, CA, 92350, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jpusztai@apu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: A higher percentage of the U.S. population is living to advanced ages than ever before. Although embraced as desirable by most, living longer presents the challenge of maintaining a sense of satisfaction with one's life. The purpose of this descriptive<br/>correlational study was to evaluate variables, including religiosity, that predict life satisfaction in a national sample of individuals 80 years of age and older. <br/>METHODS: The sample was drawn from a multistage random sampling of persons 65 and older in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Medicare Beneficiary eligibility list that participated in the Religion, Aging, and Health Survey (Krause, 2001). From an original cross-sectional sample of 1500 participants who responded to face-to-face interviews, the subsample for the present analysis included 374 individuals: 144 men and 230 women; 190 Caucasian, 184 African American. Descriptive statistics were used to identify participants&AElig; gender, race, and marital status, and to evaluate responses for the independent variables (IVs). A series of three stepwise regressions (SR) were used for this exploratory model building. The first SR entered 11 IVs found in the literature to predict life satisfaction (DV). Seven religion independent variables (RIV) were then explored in a second SR for ability to predict the DV. In a final SR analysis, those variables from the previous regressions demonstrating predictive ability of the DV were explored together for their power in explaining life satisfaction. An ANOVA was used in each step to test for model significance. <br/>RESULTS: In the first SR, five IVs emerged as significant: quality of life (QOL), locus of control, financial burden, optimism, and health status. Collectively they explained 21% of the variance of the DV. In model two, three RIVs remained as predictors and explained 10% of the DV: forgiveness of others, forgiveness from others, and centrality of faith. The final SR included the five IVs and three RIVs to explore the combined predictive ability. Only optimism was excluded in the analysis. These seven IVs and RIVs collectively demonstrated the ability to predict 27% of the experience of life satisfaction. ANOVAs for all SR models were significant (p &lt; .001). QOL was shown to be the most powerful predictor at 12% (Beta = .23, p = &lt; .001). Three RIVs were entered and remained in the final model adding 5% to the collective ability of the IVs studied for their effect on the DV.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Results suggest that while multiple factors previously identified in the literature proved predictive of the experience of life satisfaction in older persons, enhanced predictive power is provided by including spiritual variables. As spiritual aspects of interpersonal forgiveness and centrality of faith contributed significantly to the predictive ability of the model, this study offers support to areas of research and practice that explore the usefulness of these experiences in understanding and supporting life satisfaction in older persons.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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