2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157332
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DESIGNING AND EVALUATING DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUPS FOR POSTPARTUM
Abstract:
DESIGNING AND EVALUATING DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUPS FOR POSTPARTUM
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Records, Kathie, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS: This presentation will describe the issues identified when designing and evaluating a postpartum depression support group for primarily low-income and Spanish-speaking Latinas. An academic-clinical partnership to translate effective intervention approaches in the literature to this vulnerable group resulted in a theoretically grounded and culturally specific program, called Mamas Saludables - Familias Saludables.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The Surgeon General reported that racial and ethnic biologic differences in depression do not exist, but rather, ethnicity serves as a proxy variable for factors that do influence mental health. Among others, being poor, type of neighborhood, not having access to care, or not having culturally sensitive care providers are identified as problems in the U.S. that lead to disparities in access, disparities in treatment, and greater disease burden among some ethnic groups compared to whites. Despite these disparities, the majority of community-based intervention efforts in childbearing related depression have not demonstrated efficacy across cultural, ethnic, or racial groups. To address this disparity, this academic-clinical partnership sought to adapt existing interventions for a group that does not access traditional mental health services.
METHODS: A comprehensive review of the literature identified the most important topics and strategies for creating an ongoing support group for depressed and ethnically diverse women during the postpartum period. Clinical provider input regarding needs specific to the target group and participant preferences were gathered prior to implementation. Social support was chosen as the culturally accepted structure for the group. Delineation of appropriate topics, METHODS: for conveying different types of support, as well as evaluation strategies were all developed with an eye toward the needs of the participant. The group leader was bicultural and bilingual, and familiar to the participants through prior interactions in the clinic settings. Attention to the detail of the design, rather than the rigor of a research approach, required compromise and valuing.
RESULTS: The postpartum support group program consisting of 12 educational topics was implemented, using a flexible structure that facilitated development of informal support. Throughout the program, participant needs were assessed and the program was adapted, as needed, to meet the majority of participantsÆ needs. Participant satisfaction was high and informal networks were developed for most women. While educational handouts were popular, advice from other mothers was highly valued.
IMPLICATIONS: Flexibility in developing and implementing interventions in a community-based setting can be maintained long after program funding ends. Participation satisfaction and informal contacts take time to develop and may have long-lasting effects. While demonstration and evaluation projects similar to Mamas Saludables -Familias Saludables will not address diagnosis and management of depression requiring medications and therapy, the needs of new mothers who are experiencing less severe depression symptoms can be met through community-based programs. This may be one of the steps needed to extend the reach of mental healthcare services, particularly for multicultural or multilinguistic groups.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDESIGNING AND EVALUATING DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUPS FOR POSTPARTUMen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157332-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">DESIGNING AND EVALUATING DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUPS FOR POSTPARTUM</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Records, Kathie, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Kathie.Records@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: This presentation will describe the issues identified when designing and evaluating a postpartum depression support group for primarily low-income and Spanish-speaking Latinas. An academic-clinical partnership to translate effective intervention approaches in the literature to this vulnerable group resulted in a theoretically grounded and culturally specific program, called Mamas Saludables - Familias Saludables. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The Surgeon General reported that racial and ethnic biologic differences in depression do not exist, but rather, ethnicity serves as a proxy variable for factors that do influence mental health. Among others, being poor, type of neighborhood, not having access to care, or not having culturally sensitive care providers are identified as problems in the U.S. that lead to disparities in access, disparities in treatment, and greater disease burden among some ethnic groups compared to whites. Despite these disparities, the majority of community-based intervention efforts in childbearing related depression have not demonstrated efficacy across cultural, ethnic, or racial groups. To address this disparity, this academic-clinical partnership sought to adapt existing interventions for a group that does not access traditional mental health services. <br/>METHODS: A comprehensive review of the literature identified the most important topics and strategies for creating an ongoing support group for depressed and ethnically diverse women during the postpartum period. Clinical provider input regarding needs specific to the target group and participant preferences were gathered prior to implementation. Social support was chosen as the culturally accepted structure for the group. Delineation of appropriate topics, METHODS: for conveying different types of support, as well as evaluation strategies were all developed with an eye toward the needs of the participant. The group leader was bicultural and bilingual, and familiar to the participants through prior interactions in the clinic settings. Attention to the detail of the design, rather than the rigor of a research approach, required compromise and valuing. <br/>RESULTS: The postpartum support group program consisting of 12 educational topics was implemented, using a flexible structure that facilitated development of informal support. Throughout the program, participant needs were assessed and the program was adapted, as needed, to meet the majority of participants&AElig; needs. Participant satisfaction was high and informal networks were developed for most women. While educational handouts were popular, advice from other mothers was highly valued. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Flexibility in developing and implementing interventions in a community-based setting can be maintained long after program funding ends. Participation satisfaction and informal contacts take time to develop and may have long-lasting effects. While demonstration and evaluation projects similar to Mamas Saludables -Familias Saludables will not address diagnosis and management of depression requiring medications and therapy, the needs of new mothers who are experiencing less severe depression symptoms can be met through community-based programs. This may be one of the steps needed to extend the reach of mental healthcare services, particularly for multicultural or multilinguistic groups.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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