2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157333
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE VOICES OF ECUADORIAN WOMEN GIVING BIRTH
Abstract:
THE VOICES OF ECUADORIAN WOMEN GIVING BIRTH
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Reed, Shelly, DNP
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Assistant Teaching Professor
Contact Address:530 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Co-Authors:Lynn Callister; Cassidy Tomao; Katie Thornton; Cheryl Corbett
PURPOSE: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the perceptions of Ecuadorian women about giving birth.
BACKGROUND: No studies could be found documenting the perspectives of Ecuadorian childbearing women about their birth experiences. With the growing influx of immigrants into the United States from South and Central America, the need for nurses to provide culturally competent care increases. A culturally competent nurse understands the importance of social and cultural influences on women's health beliefs and practices, and generates interventions to assure quality health care delivery to diverse populations of women.
METHOD: Thirty-two women who had recently given birth in a large maternity hospital were approached on the postpartum unit or in communities surrounding Guayaquil, Ecuador and consented to participate in the study. Audio-taped interviews were conducted. Interviews were transcribed and translated and analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. Members of the research team analyzed data separately to identify preliminary themes, and analysis continued as a team to finalize the RESULTS: and identify the final themes arising from the narrative data. It was not feasible to contact study participants to do member checks, but other METHODS: were utilized to ensure the trustworthiness of the data.
RESULTS: "Enduring birth to obtain the gift" was the overarching theme. Supporting themes included caring for self and accessing prenatal care to have a healthy baby; relying on a Higher Power to ensure positive maternal/newborn outcomes; submission of self to health care providers because of fear, pain, and lack of education; and valuing motherhood. One woman said, "Endure it because the pains come, but then they are gone and then comes the joy because you have your baby." Another woman said, "I asked God and the Virgin that everything would turn out good and yes, they helped. The Virgin, I even saw her at my side. It helped me being by my side between her and God." The focus is on the well being of the child rather than the birth experience. ItÆs not about the birth experience, it is about the outcome. The woman endures to obtain the gift of the child.
IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: Understanding the importance of having a child to women from South and Central America is essential. Sensitivity to the stoicism and passivity of some women is important. Women's reliance on a Higher Power to ensure positive outcomes should be respected. The provision of education and supportive care are helpful strategies to ensure positive physiological and psychosocial outcomes in culturally diverse women. A culturally competent nurse understands the importance of social and cultural influences on patients' health beliefs and behaviors and generates interventions to assure quality health care to diverse populations of women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE VOICES OF ECUADORIAN WOMEN GIVING BIRTHen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157333-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">THE VOICES OF ECUADORIAN WOMEN GIVING BIRTH</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reed, Shelly, DNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Teaching Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">530 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shelly_reed@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lynn Callister; Cassidy Tomao; Katie Thornton; Cheryl Corbett</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the perceptions of Ecuadorian women about giving birth. <br/>BACKGROUND: No studies could be found documenting the perspectives of Ecuadorian childbearing women about their birth experiences. With the growing influx of immigrants into the United States from South and Central America, the need for nurses to provide culturally competent care increases. A culturally competent nurse understands the importance of social and cultural influences on women's health beliefs and practices, and generates interventions to assure quality health care delivery to diverse populations of women. <br/>METHOD: Thirty-two women who had recently given birth in a large maternity hospital were approached on the postpartum unit or in communities surrounding Guayaquil, Ecuador and consented to participate in the study. Audio-taped interviews were conducted. Interviews were transcribed and translated and analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. Members of the research team analyzed data separately to identify preliminary themes, and analysis continued as a team to finalize the RESULTS: and identify the final themes arising from the narrative data. It was not feasible to contact study participants to do member checks, but other METHODS: were utilized to ensure the trustworthiness of the data. <br/>RESULTS: &quot;Enduring birth to obtain the gift&quot; was the overarching theme. Supporting themes included caring for self and accessing prenatal care to have a healthy baby; relying on a Higher Power to ensure positive maternal/newborn outcomes; submission of self to health care providers because of fear, pain, and lack of education; and valuing motherhood. One woman said, &quot;Endure it because the pains come, but then they are gone and then comes the joy because you have your baby.&quot; Another woman said, &quot;I asked God and the Virgin that everything would turn out good and yes, they helped. The Virgin, I even saw her at my side. It helped me being by my side between her and God.&quot; The focus is on the well being of the child rather than the birth experience. It&AElig;s not about the birth experience, it is about the outcome. The woman endures to obtain the gift of the child. <br/>IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: Understanding the importance of having a child to women from South and Central America is essential. Sensitivity to the stoicism and passivity of some women is important. Women's reliance on a Higher Power to ensure positive outcomes should be respected. The provision of education and supportive care are helpful strategies to ensure positive physiological and psychosocial outcomes in culturally diverse women. A culturally competent nurse understands the importance of social and cultural influences on patients' health beliefs and behaviors and generates interventions to assure quality health care to diverse populations of women.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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