COMPARISON OF DEBRIEFING METHODS FOLLOWING SIMULATION: PILOT INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157334
Type:
Presentation
Title:
COMPARISON OF DEBRIEFING METHODS FOLLOWING SIMULATION: PILOT INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENT
Abstract:
COMPARISON OF DEBRIEFING METHODS FOLLOWING SIMULATION: PILOT INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENT
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Reed, Shelly, DNP, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:530 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
PURPOSE: The purpose of this comparative descriptive study was to compare student experience and the importance students place on those experiences with three debriefing methods.
BACKGROUND: Simulation use is increasing in nursing education, and debriefing after a simulation is considered to be an important part of the total simulation learning process. Few research reports have been found concerning debriefing following simulation in nursing education settings, and no research could be found comparing debriefing techniques. In addition, no research can be found as to which debriefing experiences are important to nursing students.
METHOD: As no instruments specific to the debriefing experience were available, the Debriefing Experience Scale was developed using the "Classic Test Theory" (Burns & Grove, 2005). The 39 item scale was divided into subscales, with items rated in both of the areas "experience" and "importance" to students. Simulation groups were randomized into one of three types of debriefing sessions: discussion, journaling, and blogging. After debriefing was completed, 100 students completed the Debriefing Experience Scale. Reliability statistics (Chronbach's alpha) were compiled on the scale. The differences between the three debriefing methods were determined by ANOVA, and followed by a Scheffe post hoc test.
RESULTS: Student participants perceived oral discussion debriefing contributed more to their learning than either journaling or blogging, and was viewed more favorably in most other areas of the student experience. Reliability analysis was performed on the Debriefing Experience Scale on the Experience items and Importance items separately. Chronbach's alpha was higher than .71 on six out of seven subscales in of the Experience items, and higher than .74 on five out of seven subscales of the Importance items.
IMPLICATIONS: With simulation use increasing in nursing education, understanding the student debriefing experience is essential to promote learning. The findings contribute initial information concerning debriefing methods used following simulation used in a nursing education setting. Continued refinement of the Debriefing Experience Scale is necessary, and with additional psychometric analysis may prove to be a reliable instrument to investigate debriefing methods, and provide additional information regarding the student debriefing experience.
Burns, N., & Grove, S. K. (2005). The Practice of Nursing Research (5th Ed). Philadelphia: Elsevier.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCOMPARISON OF DEBRIEFING METHODS FOLLOWING SIMULATION: PILOT INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157334-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">COMPARISON OF DEBRIEFING METHODS FOLLOWING SIMULATION: PILOT INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENT</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reed, Shelly, DNP, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">530 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shelly_reed@byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this comparative descriptive study was to compare student experience and the importance students place on those experiences with three debriefing methods. <br/> BACKGROUND: Simulation use is increasing in nursing education, and debriefing after a simulation is considered to be an important part of the total simulation learning process. Few research reports have been found concerning debriefing following simulation in nursing education settings, and no research could be found comparing debriefing techniques. In addition, no research can be found as to which debriefing experiences are important to nursing students. <br/> METHOD: As no instruments specific to the debriefing experience were available, the Debriefing Experience Scale was developed using the &quot;Classic Test Theory&quot; (Burns &amp; Grove, 2005). The 39 item scale was divided into subscales, with items rated in both of the areas &quot;experience&quot; and &quot;importance&quot; to students. Simulation groups were randomized into one of three types of debriefing sessions: discussion, journaling, and blogging. After debriefing was completed, 100 students completed the Debriefing Experience Scale. Reliability statistics (Chronbach's alpha) were compiled on the scale. The differences between the three debriefing methods were determined by ANOVA, and followed by a Scheffe post hoc test. <br/> RESULTS: Student participants perceived oral discussion debriefing contributed more to their learning than either journaling or blogging, and was viewed more favorably in most other areas of the student experience. Reliability analysis was performed on the Debriefing Experience Scale on the Experience items and Importance items separately. Chronbach's alpha was higher than .71 on six out of seven subscales in of the Experience items, and higher than .74 on five out of seven subscales of the Importance items. <br/> IMPLICATIONS: With simulation use increasing in nursing education, understanding the student debriefing experience is essential to promote learning. The findings contribute initial information concerning debriefing methods used following simulation used in a nursing education setting. Continued refinement of the Debriefing Experience Scale is necessary, and with additional psychometric analysis may prove to be a reliable instrument to investigate debriefing methods, and provide additional information regarding the student debriefing experience. <br/> Burns, N., &amp; Grove, S. K. (2005). The Practice of Nursing Research (5th Ed). Philadelphia: Elsevier.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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