2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157336
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IV INSERTION SIMULATION TECHNOLOGY STUDY
Abstract:
IV INSERTION SIMULATION TECHNOLOGY STUDY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Reinhardt, Anita C., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:New Mexico State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 30001, MSC 3185, Las Cruces, NM, 88003-8001, USA
Co-Authors:Iris Mullins; Connie DeBlieck; Pamela Schultz
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this study is to determine if computer based high-fidelity technology enables a student to access veins more efficaciously in the clinical setting than the current use of latex arm simulation technology.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Nursing programs are all experiencing the challenge of finding suitable sites for their students' clinical experiences. Simulation experiences have emerged as a way to assist and augment clinical experiences. Of the skills taught in nursing school, the insertion of an IV catheter is one of the most challenging. While patients are concerned with pain, students generally worry about success in accessing a vein. The confidence required for successful skill performance has significant impact on a student's perception of clinical success. Current simulation uses latex mannequin arms with obvious veins. These arms are thick 'skinned' and do not adequately reflect a true patient experience. Newer simulation technology offers another option. With use of a computer based monitor and a 'blind' sensitive skin area, the student can experience a realistic insertion practice. Preliminary reports from the manufacturer tout the effectiveness of this tool and portend the eventual success of students that have used the teaching aid.
METHODS: An experimental design using 94 students in a BSN nursing program was performed. Students voluntarily consented to participate and signed the consent form. Students were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control group. All completed a demographic questionnaire. One instructor gave identical lectures and demonstrations on IV insertion technique. The control group used the latex arm only for demonstration and practice and the experimental group used both the Laredal computer based IV insertion equipment and the latex arm for demonstration and practice. A skills check-off list designed for this study (a=0.9) was used to assess key behaviors required for IV insertion using a rubric. After completing the training, demonstration, and practice, the students completed a survey to assess their level of confidence (a=0.9) in IV catheter insertion skill. During their clinical experience, the students who attempted to insert an IV catheter under the supervision of their clinical instructor self-reported to the researcher their success on their first and/or second attempt.
RESULTS: The sample was 84% female, with mean age 27. Neither the skills assessment scores nor the confidence level scores varied significantly (p= 0.8 on both measures). Interestingly, there was no correlation between the skills score and the confidence level score (r=0.165). Using univariant analyses, the skill score was not different by the simulation method used (p=0.7). Similarly, no difference was seen for confidence score and simulation method. Lastly, there was no correlation between high-fidelity simulation success percentage rate and skill score or confidence score. IV insertion success in clinical sites is (will be submitted by 12-15-09).
IMPLICATIONS: While high-fidelity simulation has assisted in many areas of student practice and education, it does not appear to assist students significantly in the skill of IV insertion either in skill ability or confidence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIV INSERTION SIMULATION TECHNOLOGY STUDYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157336-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">IV INSERTION SIMULATION TECHNOLOGY STUDY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reinhardt, Anita C., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New Mexico State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 30001, MSC 3185, Las Cruces, NM, 88003-8001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">acrein@nmsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Iris Mullins; Connie DeBlieck; Pamela Schultz</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purpose of this study is to determine if computer based high-fidelity technology enables a student to access veins more efficaciously in the clinical setting than the current use of latex arm simulation technology. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Nursing programs are all experiencing the challenge of finding suitable sites for their students' clinical experiences. Simulation experiences have emerged as a way to assist and augment clinical experiences. Of the skills taught in nursing school, the insertion of an IV catheter is one of the most challenging. While patients are concerned with pain, students generally worry about success in accessing a vein. The confidence required for successful skill performance has significant impact on a student's perception of clinical success. Current simulation uses latex mannequin arms with obvious veins. These arms are thick 'skinned' and do not adequately reflect a true patient experience. Newer simulation technology offers another option. With use of a computer based monitor and a 'blind' sensitive skin area, the student can experience a realistic insertion practice. Preliminary reports from the manufacturer tout the effectiveness of this tool and portend the eventual success of students that have used the teaching aid. <br/>METHODS: An experimental design using 94 students in a BSN nursing program was performed. Students voluntarily consented to participate and signed the consent form. Students were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control group. All completed a demographic questionnaire. One instructor gave identical lectures and demonstrations on IV insertion technique. The control group used the latex arm only for demonstration and practice and the experimental group used both the Laredal computer based IV insertion equipment and the latex arm for demonstration and practice. A skills check-off list designed for this study (a=0.9) was used to assess key behaviors required for IV insertion using a rubric. After completing the training, demonstration, and practice, the students completed a survey to assess their level of confidence (a=0.9) in IV catheter insertion skill. During their clinical experience, the students who attempted to insert an IV catheter under the supervision of their clinical instructor self-reported to the researcher their success on their first and/or second attempt. <br/>RESULTS: The sample was 84% female, with mean age 27. Neither the skills assessment scores nor the confidence level scores varied significantly (p= 0.8 on both measures). Interestingly, there was no correlation between the skills score and the confidence level score (r=0.165). Using univariant analyses, the skill score was not different by the simulation method used (p=0.7). Similarly, no difference was seen for confidence score and simulation method. Lastly, there was no correlation between high-fidelity simulation success percentage rate and skill score or confidence score. IV insertion success in clinical sites is (will be submitted by 12-15-09).<br/>IMPLICATIONS: While high-fidelity simulation has assisted in many areas of student practice and education, it does not appear to assist students significantly in the skill of IV insertion either in skill ability or confidence. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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