SELF-EFFICACY, HOPE, INSULIN RESISTANCE & HEALTH IN MEXICAN AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157337
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SELF-EFFICACY, HOPE, INSULIN RESISTANCE & HEALTH IN MEXICAN AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS
Abstract:
SELF-EFFICACY, HOPE, INSULIN RESISTANCE & HEALTH IN MEXICAN AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Rentfro, Anne Rath, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:80 Fort Brown, Brownsville, TX, 78520, USA
PURPOSE/AIMS: The aims were to test predictive ability of self-esteem, self-efficacy, and hope on 1) Health Promoting Behaviors (HPB) and 2) Insulin Resistance (IR) in overweight Mexican American adolescents living in Texas (TX) along the United States (US)-Mexico border.
THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: Hendricks' Perceptual Health Promotion Determinants (HPHD) Model, first tested with predominantly Black adolescents, based on Social Cognitive Theory and Pender's Health Promotion Model, provided theoretical underpinnings. Aim 1 tests the HPHD Model in a new population and Aim 2 tests an expanded (HPHD) model with biological markers of IR.
METHODS: Demographics included age, gender, ethnicity, grade, living situation, social status (MacArthur Subjective Social Status), and acculturation (Acculturation Rating Scale-Mexican Americans (ARSMAII). Predictors' instruments included [Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Perceived Self-Efficacy, Dietary Self-Efficacy: Lower Fat & Sodium, Fruit/Vegetable Self-Efficacy, Hopefulness, and for HPB, Adolescent Lifestyle Profile]. Outcome variables included body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and Homeostasis Assessment Model for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), a commonly used IR biomarker calculated from fasting glucose (FG) and insulin
RESULTS: Forty five Mexican American adolescents (females=62%; males=38%) participated in the study. Blood samples determined FG/insulin; BMI and WC percentile for age and gender were obtained. Mean grade (10.76 +/- 1.37) was lower than expected for age (16.4 +/- 1.27); 36% lived in single parent homes. Social-status rankings were consistent with other studies; higher for community (7.40 +/- 1.37) vs. society (5.82 +/- 1.30). Acculturation revealed similar means for Mexican and Anglo orientations, 3.34 and 3.73, respectively. The majority (60%) were obese (BMI equal to or greater than 5th) and 75% had IR using 3.16 as cutoff.
Statistically significant variance was explained (38-49%) by the HPHD Model (HPB = Beta (subscript zero) + Beta (subscript 1) Self-Esteem + Beta (squared) Self-Efficacy + Beta (cubed) Hope). The self-efficacy for nutrition: fruits/vegetables model explained the most variance (49%). Hope remained a significant independent predictor (Beta=1.97-2.02); whereas, self-esteem offered little explanatory value.
For aim 2 21% (p<0.05) of the IR variance was explained with WC regressed on self-esteem, self-efficacy for physical activity, hope, and HPB with two significant independent predictors, selfûesteem (Beta=1.08) and self-efficacy for physical activity (Beta=-0.77). With HOMA-IR as the outcome variable, two significant models emerged, one with 22% and the other with 23% of the variance. In these models significant independent predictors were self-efficacy for physical activity (Beta= -0.2324) and for nutrition: Fruits/Vegetables (Beta= -0.2364).
IMPLICATIONS: Data collection occurred in one of the poorest US regions. These data provide strong evidence to support Aim 1 and the use of the HPHD Model with Mexican American adolescents. Data also support Aim 2, using an expanded model with biological markers. Several models explained IR variance; however, with less strength than self-report models. These findings, consistent with other reports of prediction using objective measures, support the existence of other IR influences: social desirability, genetics, inflammation, and physiologic conditions. These findings support intervening with self-efficacy interventions to prevent overweight and IR. These IR prediction equations contribute new information to complex health issues of overweight in Mexican American adolescents.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSELF-EFFICACY, HOPE, INSULIN RESISTANCE & HEALTH IN MEXICAN AMERICAN ADOLESCENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157337-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SELF-EFFICACY, HOPE, INSULIN RESISTANCE &amp; HEALTH IN MEXICAN AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rentfro, Anne Rath, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">80 Fort Brown, Brownsville, TX, 78520, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Anne.Rentfro@utb.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: The aims were to test predictive ability of self-esteem, self-efficacy, and hope on 1) Health Promoting Behaviors (HPB) and 2) Insulin Resistance (IR) in overweight Mexican American adolescents living in Texas (TX) along the United States (US)-Mexico border.<br/>THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: Hendricks' Perceptual Health Promotion Determinants (HPHD) Model, first tested with predominantly Black adolescents, based on Social Cognitive Theory and Pender's Health Promotion Model, provided theoretical underpinnings. Aim 1 tests the HPHD Model in a new population and Aim 2 tests an expanded (HPHD) model with biological markers of IR.<br/>METHODS: Demographics included age, gender, ethnicity, grade, living situation, social status (MacArthur Subjective Social Status), and acculturation (Acculturation Rating Scale-Mexican Americans (ARSMAII). Predictors' instruments included [Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Perceived Self-Efficacy, Dietary Self-Efficacy: Lower Fat &amp; Sodium, Fruit/Vegetable Self-Efficacy, Hopefulness, and for HPB, Adolescent Lifestyle Profile]. Outcome variables included body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and Homeostasis Assessment Model for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), a commonly used IR biomarker calculated from fasting glucose (FG) and insulin <br/>RESULTS: Forty five Mexican American adolescents (females=62%; males=38%) participated in the study. Blood samples determined FG/insulin; BMI and WC percentile for age and gender were obtained. Mean grade (10.76 +/- 1.37) was lower than expected for age (16.4 +/- 1.27); 36% lived in single parent homes. Social-status rankings were consistent with other studies; higher for community (7.40 +/- 1.37) vs. society (5.82 +/- 1.30). Acculturation revealed similar means for Mexican and Anglo orientations, 3.34 and 3.73, respectively. The majority (60%) were obese (BMI equal to or greater than 5th) and 75% had IR using 3.16 as cutoff. <br/> Statistically significant variance was explained (38-49%) by the HPHD Model (HPB = Beta (subscript zero) + Beta (subscript 1) Self-Esteem + Beta (squared) Self-Efficacy + Beta (cubed) Hope). The self-efficacy for nutrition: fruits/vegetables model explained the most variance (49%). Hope remained a significant independent predictor (Beta=1.97-2.02); whereas, self-esteem offered little explanatory value. <br/> For aim 2 21% (p&lt;0.05) of the IR variance was explained with WC regressed on self-esteem, self-efficacy for physical activity, hope, and HPB with two significant independent predictors, self&ucirc;esteem (Beta=1.08) and self-efficacy for physical activity (Beta=-0.77). With HOMA-IR as the outcome variable, two significant models emerged, one with 22% and the other with 23% of the variance. In these models significant independent predictors were self-efficacy for physical activity (Beta= -0.2324) and for nutrition: Fruits/Vegetables (Beta= -0.2364).<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Data collection occurred in one of the poorest US regions. These data provide strong evidence to support Aim 1 and the use of the HPHD Model with Mexican American adolescents. Data also support Aim 2, using an expanded model with biological markers. Several models explained IR variance; however, with less strength than self-report models. These findings, consistent with other reports of prediction using objective measures, support the existence of other IR influences: social desirability, genetics, inflammation, and physiologic conditions. These findings support intervening with self-efficacy interventions to prevent overweight and IR. These IR prediction equations contribute new information to complex health issues of overweight in Mexican American adolescents. <br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.