2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157338
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ADOLESCENT SLEEP CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TEAMS PROJECT
Abstract:
ADOLESCENT SLEEP CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TEAMS PROJECT
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Richardson, Barbara, RN, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:PO Box 1495, 103 E Spokane Falls Blvd, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The aims of this exploratory study, using data collected as part of the Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in School (TEAMS) project were to: 1) describe typical school night and weekend night sleep patterns of young adolescents, 2) examine the association between chronic shortened sleep duration and increased risk for overweight and obesity, 3) describe the relationship between short sleep duration and various indicators of health, and 4) describe the association between self reported total sleep time and feelings of daytime sleepiness.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
In the past decade, researchers have gained a better understanding of adolescent sleep needs. A growing concern has emerged for the chronically insufficient quantity and quality of sleep experienced by many of todayÆs youth. While tolerance for inadequate sleep varies across individuals, a growing body of scientific evidence demonstrates that inadequate sleep RESULTS: in varying degrees of increased daytime sleepiness, and places youth at risk for serious health, behavioral, emotional, and cognitive consequences.
METHODS:
Following university and school district IRB approval, students from four public middle schools were recruited to participate in the TEAMS project. Students were asked to complete a 10 question survey about their typical sleep habits. Participants also completed the 16 question Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ), which measures feelings of alertness and daytime sleepiness. Anthropometric measurements and blood pressure were recorded following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protocols. Serum biomarkers were obtained from a fasting blood draw.
RESULTS:
Students (N=110) ranged in age from 12-14 years (mean =12.34, SD =.512); 44% were male and 56% were female. Average total sleep time (TST) on school nights ranged from 7.5 hours to 10.5 hours (mean= 8.57, SD=0.68); 63.6% of participants did not receive the recommended 9 hours per night, and 11.8% received equal to or greater than 7.5 hours per night. Students, particularly those with sleep debt on school nights, demonstrated changes in sleep patterns on weekend nights characterized by staying up later at night and sleeping later in the morning. Short sleep duration was associated with overweight and obesity (X2(1)=1.413. p<.05). Mean CASQ score =38.48 (60 possible points, SD=4.94), illustrating that most students do not report excessive daytime sleepiness in spite of chronic sleep debt. Further associations of TST and CASQ with health indicators will be described.
IMPLICATIONS:
The underlying causes of insufficient amounts of sleep or poor sleep quality may be related to behavioral, environmental, and /or physiological factors. Regardless of the etiology, insufficient sleep may lead to increased daytime sleepiness, increased risk for overweight or obesity, and other health outcomes. Understanding sleep patterns and their relationships to adolescent health informs healthcare providers of potential interventions to implement with teens.
This project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant 2006-04637 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleADOLESCENT SLEEP CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TEAMS PROJECTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157338-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ADOLESCENT SLEEP CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TEAMS PROJECT</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Richardson, Barbara, RN, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 1495, 103 E Spokane Falls Blvd, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">barichardson@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The aims of this exploratory study, using data collected as part of the Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in School (TEAMS) project were to: 1) describe typical school night and weekend night sleep patterns of young adolescents, 2) examine the association between chronic shortened sleep duration and increased risk for overweight and obesity, 3) describe the relationship between short sleep duration and various indicators of health, and 4) describe the association between self reported total sleep time and feelings of daytime sleepiness.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>In the past decade, researchers have gained a better understanding of adolescent sleep needs. A growing concern has emerged for the chronically insufficient quantity and quality of sleep experienced by many of today&AElig;s youth. While tolerance for inadequate sleep varies across individuals, a growing body of scientific evidence demonstrates that inadequate sleep RESULTS: in varying degrees of increased daytime sleepiness, and places youth at risk for serious health, behavioral, emotional, and cognitive consequences. <br/>METHODS: <br/>Following university and school district IRB approval, students from four public middle schools were recruited to participate in the TEAMS project. Students were asked to complete a 10 question survey about their typical sleep habits. Participants also completed the 16 question Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ), which measures feelings of alertness and daytime sleepiness. Anthropometric measurements and blood pressure were recorded following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protocols. Serum biomarkers were obtained from a fasting blood draw.<br/>RESULTS: <br/>Students (N=110) ranged in age from 12-14 years (mean =12.34, SD =.512); 44% were male and 56% were female. Average total sleep time (TST) on school nights ranged from 7.5 hours to 10.5 hours (mean= 8.57, SD=0.68); 63.6% of participants did not receive the recommended 9 hours per night, and 11.8% received equal to or greater than 7.5 hours per night. Students, particularly those with sleep debt on school nights, demonstrated changes in sleep patterns on weekend nights characterized by staying up later at night and sleeping later in the morning. Short sleep duration was associated with overweight and obesity (X2(1)=1.413. p&lt;.05). Mean CASQ score =38.48 (60 possible points, SD=4.94), illustrating that most students do not report excessive daytime sleepiness in spite of chronic sleep debt. Further associations of TST and CASQ with health indicators will be described.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>The underlying causes of insufficient amounts of sleep or poor sleep quality may be related to behavioral, environmental, and /or physiological factors. Regardless of the etiology, insufficient sleep may lead to increased daytime sleepiness, increased risk for overweight or obesity, and other health outcomes. Understanding sleep patterns and their relationships to adolescent health informs healthcare providers of potential interventions to implement with teens. <br/> This project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant 2006-04637 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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