GENDER AND ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN HEART ATTACK AND STROKE SYMPTOMATOLOGY KNOWLEDGE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157341
Type:
Presentation
Title:
GENDER AND ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN HEART ATTACK AND STROKE SYMPTOMATOLOGY KNOWLEDGE
Abstract:
GENDER AND ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN HEART ATTACK AND STROKE SYMPTOMATOLOGY KNOWLEDGE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Rizzo, Therese R., MSN, RN, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio
Title:Doctoral student
Contact Address:7703 Floyd Curl, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA
INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and has been every year since 1900 except 1918. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Approximately 80,000,000 Americans have at least one form of cardiovascular disease CVD. Of the 80,000,000 with CVD, approximately 7,900,000 are due to heart attack, and approximately 6,500,000 are due to stroke. African American and Hispanic women experience a disproportionate burden of these diseases compared with Caucasian women, yet they are more likely to delay seeking treatment for acute symptoms. Studies show that greater socioeconomic status is positively related to greater awareness of and knowledge about symptoms of heart disease and stroke. Although socioeconomic status often correlates to greater levels of education, it is reasonable to assume that more education should positively relate to greater knowledge about symptoms of heart attack and stroke. The current study examined the contribution of income and educational level to womenÆs predicted knowledge regarding symptoms of heart attack and stroke as a function of race.
METHOD: Data from 2001 to 2007 were sampled from the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) that examined symptomatology knowledge among women of varying ages, education levels, income, previous comorbid diagnoses, and preexisting conditions. Knowledge scores were computed for each respondent from 13 questions related to warning signs of heart attack and stroke and what to do if symptoms arise. Regression analysis compared the contribution of education and income to symptomatology knowledge by race.
RESULTS: Caucasian women had the highest symptomatology knowledge score and the lowest variability (N = 9.98, SD = 2.16). In contrast, Hispanic women had the lowest symptomatology knowledge score and the highest variability (N = 8.40, SD = 2.69). Importantly, education provided the greatest contribution to knowledge symptomatology across all races, irrespective of income status.
DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: Although knowledge scores clearly differed by race, education is also a critical element in understanding women's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomatology. These findings suggest that interventions designed at increasing knowledge are likely to benefit women of all race classification.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGENDER AND ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN HEART ATTACK AND STROKE SYMPTOMATOLOGY KNOWLEDGEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157341-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">GENDER AND ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN HEART ATTACK AND STROKE SYMPTOMATOLOGY KNOWLEDGE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rizzo, Therese R., MSN, RN, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7703 Floyd Curl, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rizzolirn@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and has been every year since 1900 except 1918. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Approximately 80,000,000 Americans have at least one form of cardiovascular disease CVD. Of the 80,000,000 with CVD, approximately 7,900,000 are due to heart attack, and approximately 6,500,000 are due to stroke. African American and Hispanic women experience a disproportionate burden of these diseases compared with Caucasian women, yet they are more likely to delay seeking treatment for acute symptoms. Studies show that greater socioeconomic status is positively related to greater awareness of and knowledge about symptoms of heart disease and stroke. Although socioeconomic status often correlates to greater levels of education, it is reasonable to assume that more education should positively relate to greater knowledge about symptoms of heart attack and stroke. The current study examined the contribution of income and educational level to women&AElig;s predicted knowledge regarding symptoms of heart attack and stroke as a function of race. <br/>METHOD: Data from 2001 to 2007 were sampled from the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) that examined symptomatology knowledge among women of varying ages, education levels, income, previous comorbid diagnoses, and preexisting conditions. Knowledge scores were computed for each respondent from 13 questions related to warning signs of heart attack and stroke and what to do if symptoms arise. Regression analysis compared the contribution of education and income to symptomatology knowledge by race. <br/>RESULTS: Caucasian women had the highest symptomatology knowledge score and the lowest variability (N = 9.98, SD = 2.16). In contrast, Hispanic women had the lowest symptomatology knowledge score and the highest variability (N = 8.40, SD = 2.69). Importantly, education provided the greatest contribution to knowledge symptomatology across all races, irrespective of income status. <br/>DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: Although knowledge scores clearly differed by race, education is also a critical element in understanding women's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomatology. These findings suggest that interventions designed at increasing knowledge are likely to benefit women of all race classification.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:47:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:47:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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