T2DM WITH STAGE 3 CKD SELF-MANAGEMENT: HEALTH STATUS, CHANGE STAGE, AND SOCIAL SUPPORT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157345
Type:
Presentation
Title:
T2DM WITH STAGE 3 CKD SELF-MANAGEMENT: HEALTH STATUS, CHANGE STAGE, AND SOCIAL SUPPORT
Abstract:
T2DM WITH STAGE 3 CKD SELF-MANAGEMENT: HEALTH STATUS, CHANGE STAGE, AND SOCIAL SUPPORT
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Sakraida, Teresa J., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Mail Stop C288-18, 13120 E. 19th Avenue, Room 4202, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Co-Authors:Masako Terada; Buhring Anissa; Paul F. Cook
BACKGROUND: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) can lead to kidney dysfunction and failure. The T2DM patient with moderate CKD experiences a lifelong process of overcoming psycho-behavioral barriers to optimal self-management while adapting to increasing disease burden. There remains limited information about what other factors contribute to allaying progression to kidney failure.
Aims: The studyÆs aims were to describe: variation over time in T2DM and stage 3 CKD patientsÆ (1) diabetes related distress and health-related quality of life, (2) stage of change, and (3) social support.
METHODS: Patients 18 to 85 years (N = 54) were recruited from ambulatory care clinics in western Colorado to participate in a descriptive survey research study. Surveys were completed at study entry and 6 months later. Data were obtained from a sociodemographic profile, Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale, Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form (KDQOL), Stage of Change in Adopting Behaviors classification, and Chronic Illness Resources Survey (CIRS). Hemoglobin A1c (HgA1c) was retrieved from the medical record. Descriptive analysis was conducted using SPSS v. 18 with 43 subjects at entry and 39 at 6 months. Profile plots were used to assess study variables at each time point, change scores were computed, and their relationships to continuous or categorical covariates (such as demographics) were examined.
RESULTS: Subjects were treatment-experienced and included 31 men and 12 women. The mean age was 66.6 (SD = 9.3; Mdn = 69.0; 40 - 82 years) with 12 minority and 30 non-minority subjects. The mean education was 14.1 years (SD = 2.4; 9 - 20 years). Health Status: The PAID subscales with the highest means were food-related [M = 12.7 (SE =2.7)] and emotion-related [M = 17.4 (SE = 2.6)] distress. Treatment, social support and emotion-related distress had positive mean change scores at 6 months and food-related distress had the smallest mean change. The KDQOL symptom/problem list decreased from entry [M = 83.87 (SD =11.25)] to 6 months later [M = 82.64 (SD =13.73)], but kidney disease effects and kidney disease burden had positive mean changes indicating better quality of life. Stage of Change for medication had little variation from entry to 6 months with most subjects in the maintenance stage. There was variability in diet stage of change, but the majority of participants were in maintenance at both time points. Stage of change for physical activity indicated that 55% were in maintenance at 6 months, with a wide range of other levels of readiness. Social Support primarily came from healthcare professionals, media, and personal actions. At 6 months, participants reported increases in support from personal action, community, and organizations, but a decrease in dietary support.
IMPLICATIONS: Patients with T2DM with stage 3 CKD experienced food-related distress and coped with more kidney-related symptoms over time. Subjects reported greater readiness for change in medication and diet than in exercise. Subjects reported the most support from healthcare professional, media, and personal actions, with increases in community or organizational support over time.

Funding Support: Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Kappa Chapter at-Large, 2006.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleT2DM WITH STAGE 3 CKD SELF-MANAGEMENT: HEALTH STATUS, CHANGE STAGE, AND SOCIAL SUPPORTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157345-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">T2DM WITH STAGE 3 CKD SELF-MANAGEMENT: HEALTH STATUS, CHANGE STAGE, AND SOCIAL SUPPORT</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sakraida, Teresa J., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mail Stop C288-18, 13120 E. 19th Avenue, Room 4202, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Teresa.Sakraida@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Masako Terada; Buhring Anissa; Paul F. Cook</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) can lead to kidney dysfunction and failure. The T2DM patient with moderate CKD experiences a lifelong process of overcoming psycho-behavioral barriers to optimal self-management while adapting to increasing disease burden. There remains limited information about what other factors contribute to allaying progression to kidney failure. <br/>Aims: The study&AElig;s aims were to describe: variation over time in T2DM and stage 3 CKD patients&AElig; (1) diabetes related distress and health-related quality of life, (2) stage of change, and (3) social support.<br/>METHODS: Patients 18 to 85 years (N = 54) were recruited from ambulatory care clinics in western Colorado to participate in a descriptive survey research study. Surveys were completed at study entry and 6 months later. Data were obtained from a sociodemographic profile, Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale, Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form (KDQOL), Stage of Change in Adopting Behaviors classification, and Chronic Illness Resources Survey (CIRS). Hemoglobin A1c (HgA1c) was retrieved from the medical record. Descriptive analysis was conducted using SPSS v. 18 with 43 subjects at entry and 39 at 6 months. Profile plots were used to assess study variables at each time point, change scores were computed, and their relationships to continuous or categorical covariates (such as demographics) were examined. <br/>RESULTS: Subjects were treatment-experienced and included 31 men and 12 women. The mean age was 66.6 (SD = 9.3; Mdn = 69.0; 40 - 82 years) with 12 minority and 30 non-minority subjects. The mean education was 14.1 years (SD = 2.4; 9 - 20 years). Health Status: The PAID subscales with the highest means were food-related [M = 12.7 (SE =2.7)] and emotion-related [M = 17.4 (SE = 2.6)] distress. Treatment, social support and emotion-related distress had positive mean change scores at 6 months and food-related distress had the smallest mean change. The KDQOL symptom/problem list decreased from entry [M = 83.87 (SD =11.25)] to 6 months later [M = 82.64 (SD =13.73)], but kidney disease effects and kidney disease burden had positive mean changes indicating better quality of life. Stage of Change for medication had little variation from entry to 6 months with most subjects in the maintenance stage. There was variability in diet stage of change, but the majority of participants were in maintenance at both time points. Stage of change for physical activity indicated that 55% were in maintenance at 6 months, with a wide range of other levels of readiness. Social Support primarily came from healthcare professionals, media, and personal actions. At 6 months, participants reported increases in support from personal action, community, and organizations, but a decrease in dietary support. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Patients with T2DM with stage 3 CKD experienced food-related distress and coped with more kidney-related symptoms over time. Subjects reported greater readiness for change in medication and diet than in exercise. Subjects reported the most support from healthcare professional, media, and personal actions, with increases in community or organizational support over time. <br/><br/>Funding Support: Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Kappa Chapter at-Large, 2006.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:47:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:47:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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