2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157346
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PRECARIOUS EMPLOYMENT AND WOMEN'S HEALTH WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF MICROENTERPRISE
Abstract:
PRECARIOUS EMPLOYMENT AND WOMEN'S HEALTH WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF MICROENTERPRISE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Salt, Rebekah J., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MSC09-5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-5688, USA
PURPOSE/AIMS: Income women who work in microenterprise in a state in the Southwest. The specific aims of this study are to: 1) identify the health concerns of low-income women who utilize resources from Women's Economic Self-sufficiency Team (WESST) in a state in the Southwest to support microenterprise, and 2) develop a social ecological model which identifies the dimensions and pathways between microenterprise and health for low-income women in a state in the Southwest.
RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: In response to changes in labor markets around the world, more people are generating income in part-time, temporary, or self-employed work labeled by public health researchers as precarious employment. The term implies that the work has some level of insecurity related to income, benefits, or status of employment. Although reports have been inconsistent, the majority of studies have suggested that precarious employment can be detrimental to health. In contrast, several researchers have purported that the flexibility and freedom afforded by precarious work arrangements may also be beneficial to health. Microenterprise programs offer innovative lending opportunities for low-income populations, the majority of who are women to start or sustain small businesses. The Women's Self-Sufficiency Team in a state in the Southwest offers microloans and financial literacy training to people to start small microenterprises and leverage toward self-sufficiency. The majority of participants are women, low-income, and ethnic minorities. Research has long established that women are one of the strongest links to the health and well-being of the family, yet social expectations put them at risk for neglecting their own health. In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) convened to discuss microenterprise as an intervention model for HIV/AIDS prevention. Consultants acknowledged that microenterprise has the potential to broadly affect health through the inclusion of health education or links to health care within program design. In addition, the group recommended public and private partnerships at multiple intervention levels to influence health outcomes. To date, there is no research which addresses precarious employment and health within the context of microenterprise.
METHODS: Data collection will begin in November 2006. Six focus groups will be conducted with women who utilize financial and/or educational resources from WESST at six different sites in a state in the Southwest. Data will be analyzed using content analysis.
IMPLICATIONS: These data and a social ecology model will be used to increase the understanding of precarious employment and women's health within the context of microenterprise and inform community-driven health intervention programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePRECARIOUS EMPLOYMENT AND WOMEN'S HEALTH WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF MICROENTERPRISEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157346-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PRECARIOUS EMPLOYMENT AND WOMEN'S HEALTH WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF MICROENTERPRISE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Salt, Rebekah J., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09-5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-5688, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rsalt@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: Income women who work in microenterprise in a state in the Southwest. The specific aims of this study are to: 1) identify the health concerns of low-income women who utilize resources from Women's Economic Self-sufficiency Team (WESST) in a state in the Southwest to support microenterprise, and 2) develop a social ecological model which identifies the dimensions and pathways between microenterprise and health for low-income women in a state in the Southwest. <br/>RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: In response to changes in labor markets around the world, more people are generating income in part-time, temporary, or self-employed work labeled by public health researchers as precarious employment. The term implies that the work has some level of insecurity related to income, benefits, or status of employment. Although reports have been inconsistent, the majority of studies have suggested that precarious employment can be detrimental to health. In contrast, several researchers have purported that the flexibility and freedom afforded by precarious work arrangements may also be beneficial to health. Microenterprise programs offer innovative lending opportunities for low-income populations, the majority of who are women to start or sustain small businesses. The Women's Self-Sufficiency Team in a state in the Southwest offers microloans and financial literacy training to people to start small microenterprises and leverage toward self-sufficiency. The majority of participants are women, low-income, and ethnic minorities. Research has long established that women are one of the strongest links to the health and well-being of the family, yet social expectations put them at risk for neglecting their own health. In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) convened to discuss microenterprise as an intervention model for HIV/AIDS prevention. Consultants acknowledged that microenterprise has the potential to broadly affect health through the inclusion of health education or links to health care within program design. In addition, the group recommended public and private partnerships at multiple intervention levels to influence health outcomes. To date, there is no research which addresses precarious employment and health within the context of microenterprise. <br/>METHODS: Data collection will begin in November 2006. Six focus groups will be conducted with women who utilize financial and/or educational resources from WESST at six different sites in a state in the Southwest. Data will be analyzed using content analysis. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: These data and a social ecology model will be used to increase the understanding of precarious employment and women's health within the context of microenterprise and inform community-driven health intervention programs.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:47:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:47:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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