2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157348
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MEASURING COGNITIVE PROCESSING ABILITY IN ADOLESCENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA
Abstract:
MEASURING COGNITIVE PROCESSING ABILITY IN ADOLESCENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Schepp, Karen G., PhD, PMHNP-BC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Box 357263, School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Co-Authors:Hyun Jung Kim
PURPOSE: The purpose of this presentation is to describe the procedure used to measure adolescents' cognitive processing ability prior to their participation in an RCT treatment. The RCT was a symptom management program for adolescents with schizophrenia. Rationale: Research with individuals with schizophrenia is challenging because of the fluctuations in their cognitive processing ability. Positive symptoms (hallucinations, delusions) and negative symptoms (withdrawal, apathy, and ambivalence) affect their ability to make sense out of the everyday experiences they encounter. Their ability to think logically is hampered when the symptoms escalate and consume their attention. Most often in the research with individuals with schizophrenia, cognitive processing ability is not measured and so it is not clear how much of the information presented to them was actually received and processed by them. The theoretical basis for the treatment was symptom management theory.
METHODS: The sample for this RCT was 40 adolescents with schizophrenia, ages 15 to 19, and their family members. Families were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a control group. The treatment involved 12 2-hour sessions in symptom management administered over 14 months in multifamily small group cohorts. Prior to each session, The Symbol Digit Modality Test (SDMT) was administered to all family members. The SDMT is a one page test with figures and assigned numbers. The purpose of the test is to evaluate one's cognitive processing ability. The page is arranged with multiple figures. The individual writes the number below the figure as it is shown on the top of the page. The test is a timed test and is administered in 90 seconds. The test was used before each intervention session to determine the degree of cognitive processing of each adolescent/family member. The test is scored by counting the number of correctly numbered figures at the end of the 90 seconds. The total possible score is 120. A higher number indicates the individual is processing information more readily. The test is routinely used to validate subjects' cognitive processing. The SDMT was tested with 25 adults with chronic schizophrenia whose mean age was 40.5 years. The mean score for the adults was 25.33. No norms were available for adolescents with schizophrenia.
RESULTS: The adolescents' average scores for total responses ranged from 14.5 to 51.5. The average number of correct responses ranged from 14.25 to 49.13. In comparison to the scores for family members, adolescents tended to score considerably lower in total responses and in correct responses indicating less cognitive processing ability.
IMPLICATIONS: The adolescents tended to score higher than the sample of adults with chronic schizophrenia but lower than other members in their family. Their cognitive processing ability is not as compromised as in those with chronic schizophrenia so they have potential to prevent further loss of ability by close monitoring of symptoms to prevent relapses. The lower scores in comparison to family members' validate the presence of the illness and the severity. These findings suggest how crucial early symptom management training and medication adherence are for these adolescents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMEASURING COGNITIVE PROCESSING ABILITY IN ADOLESCENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157348-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">MEASURING COGNITIVE PROCESSING ABILITY IN ADOLESCENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schepp, Karen G., PhD, PMHNP-BC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 357263, School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kschepp@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hyun Jung Kim</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this presentation is to describe the procedure used to measure adolescents' cognitive processing ability prior to their participation in an RCT treatment. The RCT was a symptom management program for adolescents with schizophrenia. Rationale: Research with individuals with schizophrenia is challenging because of the fluctuations in their cognitive processing ability. Positive symptoms (hallucinations, delusions) and negative symptoms (withdrawal, apathy, and ambivalence) affect their ability to make sense out of the everyday experiences they encounter. Their ability to think logically is hampered when the symptoms escalate and consume their attention. Most often in the research with individuals with schizophrenia, cognitive processing ability is not measured and so it is not clear how much of the information presented to them was actually received and processed by them. The theoretical basis for the treatment was symptom management theory. <br/>METHODS: The sample for this RCT was 40 adolescents with schizophrenia, ages 15 to 19, and their family members. Families were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a control group. The treatment involved 12 2-hour sessions in symptom management administered over 14 months in multifamily small group cohorts. Prior to each session, The Symbol Digit Modality Test (SDMT) was administered to all family members. The SDMT is a one page test with figures and assigned numbers. The purpose of the test is to evaluate one's cognitive processing ability. The page is arranged with multiple figures. The individual writes the number below the figure as it is shown on the top of the page. The test is a timed test and is administered in 90 seconds. The test was used before each intervention session to determine the degree of cognitive processing of each adolescent/family member. The test is scored by counting the number of correctly numbered figures at the end of the 90 seconds. The total possible score is 120. A higher number indicates the individual is processing information more readily. The test is routinely used to validate subjects' cognitive processing. The SDMT was tested with 25 adults with chronic schizophrenia whose mean age was 40.5 years. The mean score for the adults was 25.33. No norms were available for adolescents with schizophrenia. <br/>RESULTS: The adolescents' average scores for total responses ranged from 14.5 to 51.5. The average number of correct responses ranged from 14.25 to 49.13. In comparison to the scores for family members, adolescents tended to score considerably lower in total responses and in correct responses indicating less cognitive processing ability. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: The adolescents tended to score higher than the sample of adults with chronic schizophrenia but lower than other members in their family. Their cognitive processing ability is not as compromised as in those with chronic schizophrenia so they have potential to prevent further loss of ability by close monitoring of symptoms to prevent relapses. The lower scores in comparison to family members' validate the presence of the illness and the severity. These findings suggest how crucial early symptom management training and medication adherence are for these adolescents. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:47:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:47:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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