2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157349
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DISPARITIES IN CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING AMONG LATINAS IN CALIFORNIA
Abstract:
DISPARITIES IN CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING AMONG LATINAS IN CALIFORNIA
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Schmotzer, Geri, RN, MPH, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:New Mexico State University
Title:Predoctrol Fellow
Contact Address:PO Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM, 88003, USA
The purpose of the descriptive cross-sectional study is to examine the factors that enable or impede cervical cancer screening among Latinas in California. This study applied a well-known theoretical framework for health service usage, the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, to examine correlates of Pap testing practices among Latinas who were native-born, recently immigrated or established immigrants.
Data from the combined 2001, 2003, and 2005 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) for self-identified Latinas was explored to determine Pap testing practices and rates. Weighted data for 13,889 Latinas were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models to assess factors that facilitated or presented barriers to Pap testing.
This study determined there was an overall decline of 3% by Latinas reporting a Pap test in their lifetime. Latinas who had health insurance, food insecurity, and/or quit smoking were more likely to have received a Pap test in their lifetime. Time since immigration, age, education, marital status, family type, and time since the last physician visit were variables that contributed the least to ever having a Pap test for Latinas in California.
The theoretical model used for this study, with its emphasis on economic as well as social and psychological factors, appears to fit the data well and addresses the relevant explanatory factors. This study found that among the three groups: U.S.-born, recent immigrants, and established immigrants, lifetime use of Pap testing was lowest among the recently immigrated Latinas, controlling for other known factors associated with screening. This finding demonstrates the importance of targeting recent Latina immigrants to increase the use of cervical cancer screening. However, the declining trend for both native Latinas and established immigrants in Pap testing rates suggests a need for health professionals to target all Latinas, regardless of immigration status, to increase the rate of Pap testing among this vulnerable group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDISPARITIES IN CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING AMONG LATINAS IN CALIFORNIAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157349-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">DISPARITIES IN CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING AMONG LATINAS IN CALIFORNIA</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schmotzer, Geri, RN, MPH, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New Mexico State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctrol Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM, 88003, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">glschmotzer@cox.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of the descriptive cross-sectional study is to examine the factors that enable or impede cervical cancer screening among Latinas in California. This study applied a well-known theoretical framework for health service usage, the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, to examine correlates of Pap testing practices among Latinas who were native-born, recently immigrated or established immigrants. <br/> Data from the combined 2001, 2003, and 2005 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) for self-identified Latinas was explored to determine Pap testing practices and rates. Weighted data for 13,889 Latinas were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models to assess factors that facilitated or presented barriers to Pap testing. <br/> This study determined there was an overall decline of 3% by Latinas reporting a Pap test in their lifetime. Latinas who had health insurance, food insecurity, and/or quit smoking were more likely to have received a Pap test in their lifetime. Time since immigration, age, education, marital status, family type, and time since the last physician visit were variables that contributed the least to ever having a Pap test for Latinas in California.<br/> The theoretical model used for this study, with its emphasis on economic as well as social and psychological factors, appears to fit the data well and addresses the relevant explanatory factors. This study found that among the three groups: U.S.-born, recent immigrants, and established immigrants, lifetime use of Pap testing was lowest among the recently immigrated Latinas, controlling for other known factors associated with screening. This finding demonstrates the importance of targeting recent Latina immigrants to increase the use of cervical cancer screening. However, the declining trend for both native Latinas and established immigrants in Pap testing rates suggests a need for health professionals to target all Latinas, regardless of immigration status, to increase the rate of Pap testing among this vulnerable group.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:47:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:47:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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