2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157350
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS IN PARTNERS OF BREAST AND PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS
Abstract:
PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS IN PARTNERS OF BREAST AND PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Segrin, Chris, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Professor
Contact Address:1103 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA
Co-Authors:Terry Badger
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this investigation was to compare psychological distress of partners of different relationships (e.g., intimate partner/spouse, family members, friends) with cancer survivors and to compare these levels of distress with population norms. A secondary OBJECTIVE: of this investigation was to evaluate whether female partners of cancer survivors had a higher risk for psychological distress than male partners and why this might be the case.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Partners of cancer patients are at risk for psychological distress, yet are rarely offered treatment for that distress.
METHODS:
Partners in this investigation included spouses/significant others, siblings, adult children, friends, parents, and cousins of cancer survivors. Participants were 201 partners of English-speaking women with breast cancer, Spanish-speaking women with breast cancer, or English-speaking men with prostate cancer. The partners reported on their symptoms of depression, positive and negative affect, anxiety, and relationship satisfaction.
RESULTS:
The results showed that most relational groups had levels of psychological distress that were indistinguishable from those of spouses/significant others. However, spouses, and to a lesser extent, adult children were the only partner groups whose levels of psychological distress were above published population norms. Relationship satisfaction was negatively associated with virtually all indicators of partners' psychological distress. Tests of gender differences revealed that female partners had higher levels of depression than male partners. The effect was deconstructed with a test of the indirect effect of gender on depression through perceived stress. Results confirmed that female partners had higher levels of depression due in part to their higher perceived stress.
IMPLICATIONS:
These results show how psychological distress, when a loved one has cancer, is experienced by a variety of social network members at a similar level as experienced by spouses/significant others. Having a satisfying relationship with the cancer survivor is associated with lower levels of distress. It is also apparent that female partners are at elevated risk of depression, due to higher levels of stress that they experience, perhaps due to assuming a greater care giving burden for their friend or family member with cancer. These findings highlight the importance of making psychosocial interventions available to social network members of cancer survivors who may not necessarily be spouses or significant others, but are still important sources of support and care who are themselves susceptible to distress. This study's findings show that these other, often overlooked, partners of cancer survivors have psychological needs that are often on par with those of spouses/significant others of cancer survivors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS IN PARTNERS OF BREAST AND PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157350-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS IN PARTNERS OF BREAST AND PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Segrin, Chris, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1103 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">segrin@u.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Terry Badger</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purpose of this investigation was to compare psychological distress of partners of different relationships (e.g., intimate partner/spouse, family members, friends) with cancer survivors and to compare these levels of distress with population norms. A secondary OBJECTIVE: of this investigation was to evaluate whether female partners of cancer survivors had a higher risk for psychological distress than male partners and why this might be the case. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:<br/>Partners of cancer patients are at risk for psychological distress, yet are rarely offered treatment for that distress. <br/>METHODS: <br/>Partners in this investigation included spouses/significant others, siblings, adult children, friends, parents, and cousins of cancer survivors. Participants were 201 partners of English-speaking women with breast cancer, Spanish-speaking women with breast cancer, or English-speaking men with prostate cancer. The partners reported on their symptoms of depression, positive and negative affect, anxiety, and relationship satisfaction. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>The results showed that most relational groups had levels of psychological distress that were indistinguishable from those of spouses/significant others. However, spouses, and to a lesser extent, adult children were the only partner groups whose levels of psychological distress were above published population norms. Relationship satisfaction was negatively associated with virtually all indicators of partners' psychological distress. Tests of gender differences revealed that female partners had higher levels of depression than male partners. The effect was deconstructed with a test of the indirect effect of gender on depression through perceived stress. Results confirmed that female partners had higher levels of depression due in part to their higher perceived stress. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>These results show how psychological distress, when a loved one has cancer, is experienced by a variety of social network members at a similar level as experienced by spouses/significant others. Having a satisfying relationship with the cancer survivor is associated with lower levels of distress. It is also apparent that female partners are at elevated risk of depression, due to higher levels of stress that they experience, perhaps due to assuming a greater care giving burden for their friend or family member with cancer. These findings highlight the importance of making psychosocial interventions available to social network members of cancer survivors who may not necessarily be spouses or significant others, but are still important sources of support and care who are themselves susceptible to distress. This study's findings show that these other, often overlooked, partners of cancer survivors have psychological needs that are often on par with those of spouses/significant others of cancer survivors.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:47:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:47:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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