2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157352
Type:
Presentation
Title:
OPTIMIZING CARE TRANISTIONS: ASSISTED LIVING
Abstract:
OPTIMIZING CARE TRANISTIONS: ASSISTED LIVING
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Sharpp, Tara J., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Davis
Title:Claire M. Fagin Postdoctoral Fellow
Contact Address:4610 X Street, Suite 4202, Sacramento, CA, 95817, USA
PURPSE/AIMS: to and from the acute care setting. This presentation, part of a symposium on optimizing care transitions across the continuum, will discuss an ethnographic research study in two assisted living facilities that provide care exclusively to residents with dementia.
BACKGROUND: Assisted living facilities (ALFs) are a prominent source of housing for seniors in the United States. It is estimated that over 50% of the residents in ALFs have some form of cognitive impairment. The only requirements for employees in ALFs in California are to have a criminal BACKGROUND: check and to receive ten hours of training at the facility. Registered nurses (RNs) or other health care personnel are not required to be employed in ALFs in California.
METHODS: Participant observation and interviews were conducted with all the employees and family members. Incident data on the number and reason of resident falls, emergency department and hospital admissions were collected over six months. The data were transcribed and analyzed for themes regarding how employees in ALFs provide for residents' transitions to and from acute care.
RESULTS: 40% of the residents were admitted to the hospital or emergency department over six months, many for preventable conditions such as infectious diseases or improper use of medications. Many residents were readmitted to the hospital and employees and family members reported frustration and confusion about the discharge process.
IMPLICATIONS: Despite the multiple functional, medical, and cognitive needs of residents, RNs or other health care personnel were not employed in these facilities. The difficulties in transitions from acute care observed in these facilities demonstrate the need for improved supervision and education for the employees. Studies by Mary Naylor and colleagues on using advanced practice nurses in other settings showed improved patient outcomes which warrants further investigation in assisted living.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOPTIMIZING CARE TRANISTIONS: ASSISTED LIVINGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157352-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">OPTIMIZING CARE TRANISTIONS: ASSISTED LIVING</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sharpp, Tara J., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Davis</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Claire M. Fagin Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4610 X Street, Suite 4202, Sacramento, CA, 95817, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tara.sharpp@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPSE/AIMS: to and from the acute care setting. This presentation, part of a symposium on optimizing care transitions across the continuum, will discuss an ethnographic research study in two assisted living facilities that provide care exclusively to residents with dementia. <br/>BACKGROUND: Assisted living facilities (ALFs) are a prominent source of housing for seniors in the United States. It is estimated that over 50% of the residents in ALFs have some form of cognitive impairment. The only requirements for employees in ALFs in California are to have a criminal BACKGROUND: check and to receive ten hours of training at the facility. Registered nurses (RNs) or other health care personnel are not required to be employed in ALFs in California.<br/>METHODS: Participant observation and interviews were conducted with all the employees and family members. Incident data on the number and reason of resident falls, emergency department and hospital admissions were collected over six months. The data were transcribed and analyzed for themes regarding how employees in ALFs provide for residents' transitions to and from acute care. <br/>RESULTS: 40% of the residents were admitted to the hospital or emergency department over six months, many for preventable conditions such as infectious diseases or improper use of medications. Many residents were readmitted to the hospital and employees and family members reported frustration and confusion about the discharge process. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Despite the multiple functional, medical, and cognitive needs of residents, RNs or other health care personnel were not employed in these facilities. The difficulties in transitions from acute care observed in these facilities demonstrate the need for improved supervision and education for the employees. Studies by Mary Naylor and colleagues on using advanced practice nurses in other settings showed improved patient outcomes which warrants further investigation in assisted living.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:47:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:47:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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