2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157353
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EFFECTS OF A SHORT-TERM LINGUISTIC CLASS ON INTERNATIONAL NURSES
Abstract:
EFFECTS OF A SHORT-TERM LINGUISTIC CLASS ON INTERNATIONAL NURSES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Shen, Jay, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Co-Authors:Yu Xu; Anne Bolstad
PURPOSE: To test the effectiveness of a 10-session linguistic class on the reduction of phonological errors among international nurses working in two hospitals.
BACKGROUND: Frequent errors in phonology, which contribute to accented speech, are the most common and challenging communication barriers for many international nurses in the clinical setting. In addition, perception of international nurses' competence by patients, peers, and other health professionals is negatively affected because of these communication barriers.
METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study. Participants included 61 international nurses (32 in the intervention group and 29 in the comparison group) from two community hospitals in the same hospital system in a Southwestern metropolitan area. The intervention was a 10-session phonological accent reduction class. Each session lasted for two hours. Each nurse in both groups underwent pre- and post-assessments, based on the Compton's Phonological Assessment of Foreign Accent (CPAFA). Two dependent variables were used. One was the total number of errors made by the individual participant based on CPAFA whereas the other was the difference in the total number of errors made by each participant between the pre- and post-intervention. Participants' age, sex, native language, age of arrival to the U.S., and the number of years living in the U.S. were controlled in multi-variable analysis.
RESULTS: No significant difference was found in the number of errors made before intervention between the intervention group (61.0) and the comparison group (54.3) (p > 0.1). The difference became statistically significant after the intervention with the intervention group making an average of 25.1 errors and the comparison group making an average of 45.5 errors (p < 0.01). Results from multivariable analysis indicated that the intervention group reduced 24 more errors than did the comparison group after the intervention (p < 0.01). Furthermore, participants in both groups who made more errors in pre-assessment reduced more errors in post-assessment.
IMPLICATIONS: The short-term linguistics class appeared to be effective in reducing phonological errors in international nurses, thus enhancing their communication competence. However, caution is warranted to generalize the study findings because of the small sample size and other potential factors that may have magnified the magnitude of its effect. It is recommended that larger studies are needed to validate the findings of this pilot study. If the program were truly effective, not only all international nurses could improve their communication competence, but also disparities in phonological errors across international nurses could be markedly narrowed through the intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEFFECTS OF A SHORT-TERM LINGUISTIC CLASS ON INTERNATIONAL NURSESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157353-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EFFECTS OF A SHORT-TERM LINGUISTIC CLASS ON INTERNATIONAL NURSES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shen, Jay, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jay.shen@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Yu Xu; Anne Bolstad</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: To test the effectiveness of a 10-session linguistic class on the reduction of phonological errors among international nurses working in two hospitals. <br/>BACKGROUND: Frequent errors in phonology, which contribute to accented speech, are the most common and challenging communication barriers for many international nurses in the clinical setting. In addition, perception of international nurses' competence by patients, peers, and other health professionals is negatively affected because of these communication barriers. <br/>METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study. Participants included 61 international nurses (32 in the intervention group and 29 in the comparison group) from two community hospitals in the same hospital system in a Southwestern metropolitan area. The intervention was a 10-session phonological accent reduction class. Each session lasted for two hours. Each nurse in both groups underwent pre- and post-assessments, based on the Compton's Phonological Assessment of Foreign Accent (CPAFA). Two dependent variables were used. One was the total number of errors made by the individual participant based on CPAFA whereas the other was the difference in the total number of errors made by each participant between the pre- and post-intervention. Participants' age, sex, native language, age of arrival to the U.S., and the number of years living in the U.S. were controlled in multi-variable analysis. <br/>RESULTS: No significant difference was found in the number of errors made before intervention between the intervention group (61.0) and the comparison group (54.3) (p &gt; 0.1). The difference became statistically significant after the intervention with the intervention group making an average of 25.1 errors and the comparison group making an average of 45.5 errors (p &lt; 0.01). Results from multivariable analysis indicated that the intervention group reduced 24 more errors than did the comparison group after the intervention (p &lt; 0.01). Furthermore, participants in both groups who made more errors in pre-assessment reduced more errors in post-assessment. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: The short-term linguistics class appeared to be effective in reducing phonological errors in international nurses, thus enhancing their communication competence. However, caution is warranted to generalize the study findings because of the small sample size and other potential factors that may have magnified the magnitude of its effect. It is recommended that larger studies are needed to validate the findings of this pilot study. If the program were truly effective, not only all international nurses could improve their communication competence, but also disparities in phonological errors across international nurses could be markedly narrowed through the intervention.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:47:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:47:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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