2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157354
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DEAF ADULTS AND HEALTH CARE: GIVING VOICE TO THEIR STORIES
Abstract:
DEAF ADULTS AND HEALTH CARE: GIVING VOICE TO THEIR STORIES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Sheppard, Kate G., PhD, RN, FNP, PMHNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University Nevada Reno
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MS 134, Reno, NV, 89557, USA
PURPOSE: Describe Deaf adults' experiences receiving health care. Descriptions include: barriers to health care access, patient challenges with nurses and other health care providers, and outcomes when no health care is obtained.
BACKGROUND: Deaf adults may be vulnerable in health care settings (culturally Deaf adults are individuals who lost hearing early in life, who communicate primarily in American Sign Language {ASL}, and who self-identify as members of the Deaf culture). Providers often feel discomfort toward Deaf patients and unprepared to interact with these patients. Deaf patients may have difficulty communicating with the health care team and are usually asked to communicate in language beyond their comfort. Communication poses the greatest challenge between providers and Deaf patients, and is unrelated to intelligence. Deaf high school graduates may only read and write English at a 5th grade level. This may cause misunderstanding if providers depend on written notes to communicate. Providers frequently treat Deaf adults as disabled, while most Deaf consider themselves as a cultural or linguistic minority. This can create confusion, misunderstanding, resentment, frustration, lack of understanding, and ultimately lead Deaf individuals to refrain from seeking health care altogether.
METHOD: As part of a larger hermeneutic study that explored depressive symptoms among Deaf adults, qualitative interviews were conducted with 9 culturally Deaf adults. Each participant was interviewed three times each, and certified American Sign Language interpreters were used to enhance understanding. Interviews were reviewed with interpreters for accuracy of translation; text was generated through word-for-word transcription and observations.
Findings: Participants volunteered their experiences in seeking health care. Barriers to accessing health care included not knowing where to go or how to access health care, and difficulty communicating with front office staff in order to even schedule appointments. As children, participants endured painful procedures and were frequently accused of not trying hard enough to hear or to vocalize. As adults the participants experienced being ignored in the waiting room, having procedures such as pelvic exams done without any communication, and having practitioners focus on the etiology of deafness but overlooking the patient's reason for seeking care. Situations arose in which interpreters were an unwelcome presence. Communication was frequently meaningless, especially when medical terminology was used. Most participants left the health care setting without ever having their concern addressed. Outcomes included no health promotion examinations, development of preventable illnesses, and distrust of health care providers.
IMPLICATIONS: This research describes challenges faced by Deaf adults in health care settings. Nurses can help to improve care for Deaf patients by anticipating needs such as face-face communication, using telephone relay operators, and asking the Deaf patient how he or she would prefer to communicate. All procedures must be explained in advance. If an interpreter is desired by the Deaf patient, one should be made available; family members are not acceptable interpreters. Nurses should ensure that the Deaf patient has access to face-face contact during any procedures. Improved communication between providers and Deaf patients will help to reduce morbidity and mortality in this underserved population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDEAF ADULTS AND HEALTH CARE: GIVING VOICE TO THEIR STORIESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157354-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">DEAF ADULTS AND HEALTH CARE: GIVING VOICE TO THEIR STORIES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sheppard, Kate G., PhD, RN, FNP, PMHNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University Nevada Reno</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MS 134, Reno, NV, 89557, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kates@unr.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: Describe Deaf adults' experiences receiving health care. Descriptions include: barriers to health care access, patient challenges with nurses and other health care providers, and outcomes when no health care is obtained.<br/>BACKGROUND: Deaf adults may be vulnerable in health care settings (culturally Deaf adults are individuals who lost hearing early in life, who communicate primarily in American Sign Language {ASL}, and who self-identify as members of the Deaf culture). Providers often feel discomfort toward Deaf patients and unprepared to interact with these patients. Deaf patients may have difficulty communicating with the health care team and are usually asked to communicate in language beyond their comfort. Communication poses the greatest challenge between providers and Deaf patients, and is unrelated to intelligence. Deaf high school graduates may only read and write English at a 5th grade level. This may cause misunderstanding if providers depend on written notes to communicate. Providers frequently treat Deaf adults as disabled, while most Deaf consider themselves as a cultural or linguistic minority. This can create confusion, misunderstanding, resentment, frustration, lack of understanding, and ultimately lead Deaf individuals to refrain from seeking health care altogether.<br/>METHOD: As part of a larger hermeneutic study that explored depressive symptoms among Deaf adults, qualitative interviews were conducted with 9 culturally Deaf adults. Each participant was interviewed three times each, and certified American Sign Language interpreters were used to enhance understanding. Interviews were reviewed with interpreters for accuracy of translation; text was generated through word-for-word transcription and observations.<br/>Findings: Participants volunteered their experiences in seeking health care. Barriers to accessing health care included not knowing where to go or how to access health care, and difficulty communicating with front office staff in order to even schedule appointments. As children, participants endured painful procedures and were frequently accused of not trying hard enough to hear or to vocalize. As adults the participants experienced being ignored in the waiting room, having procedures such as pelvic exams done without any communication, and having practitioners focus on the etiology of deafness but overlooking the patient's reason for seeking care. Situations arose in which interpreters were an unwelcome presence. Communication was frequently meaningless, especially when medical terminology was used. Most participants left the health care setting without ever having their concern addressed. Outcomes included no health promotion examinations, development of preventable illnesses, and distrust of health care providers.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: This research describes challenges faced by Deaf adults in health care settings. Nurses can help to improve care for Deaf patients by anticipating needs such as face-face communication, using telephone relay operators, and asking the Deaf patient how he or she would prefer to communicate. All procedures must be explained in advance. If an interpreter is desired by the Deaf patient, one should be made available; family members are not acceptable interpreters. Nurses should ensure that the Deaf patient has access to face-face contact during any procedures. Improved communication between providers and Deaf patients will help to reduce morbidity and mortality in this underserved population.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:47:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:47:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.