2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157355
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IMPACT OF HUMAN PATIENT SIMULATION ON NURSING CLINICAL KNOWLEDGE-STUDY RESULTS
Abstract:
IMPACT OF HUMAN PATIENT SIMULATION ON NURSING CLINICAL KNOWLEDGE-STUDY RESULTS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Shinnick, Mary Ann, MN, PhD-c
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Los Angeles
Title:Ms.
Contact Address:5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA
Co-Authors:Mary Woo
PURPOSES/AIMS: The specific aim of this study was to determine if Human Patient Simulation (HPS) improved clinical knowledge in heart failure in undergraduate nursing students.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Heart Failure (HF) is the most common hospital discharge diagnosis in the United States in patients aged 65 and older. In addition, there are over six million people with HF and more than 550,000 more are newly diagnosed each year (Schocken, et al., 2008). Therefore, it is important that nursing students learn to manage HF patients in the clinical setting. The theoretical framework used was the one developed by the NLN, "Nursing Education Simulation Framework" which is based on the theoretical and empirical literature in the area of simulation in both the nursing and medical literature. It was developed and tested through the NLN/Laerdal Simulation Study (Jeffries, 2005).
METHODS: Following IRB approval at each institution, 162 students (age 25.7 +/- 6.6; gender =85.5% female) from 3 nursing schools were studied in groups of 5 at the same point in their curriculum using a HF simulation (Laerdal, New York). Tests included a HF knowledge pre-test and post-test after specific stages of the HF simulation (given after the hands on [Post-test 1] and another after debriefing [Post-test 2]). Groups were randomized to Experimental (received simulation after the pre-test) and Control (did not receive simulation until after the first post-test). The knowledge tests consisted of questions regarding care of an acute heart failure patient.
RESULTS: Using paired t-tests, no significant differences in knowledge scores between groups were seen at baseline (pre-test) or at the time of the first post test (p=.06). However, there were significant differences both after the simulation (post-test) and again after the debriefing (post-test 2) for the experimental group (p<0.001).
IMPLICATIONS: This study has shown simulation, in combination with debriefing, to be a useful learning method for the care of the heart failure patient in pre-licensure nursing students. IMPLICATIONS: for this study include providing information on HPS efficacy to educators in both school and acute care settings, which can impact the use and implementation of this very expensive and resource-intensive training technology.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIMPACT OF HUMAN PATIENT SIMULATION ON NURSING CLINICAL KNOWLEDGE-STUDY RESULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157355-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">IMPACT OF HUMAN PATIENT SIMULATION ON NURSING CLINICAL KNOWLEDGE-STUDY RESULTS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shinnick, Mary Ann, MN, PhD-c</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Los Angeles</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maswurm@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Woo</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The specific aim of this study was to determine if Human Patient Simulation (HPS) improved clinical knowledge in heart failure in undergraduate nursing students. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Heart Failure (HF) is the most common hospital discharge diagnosis in the United States in patients aged 65 and older. In addition, there are over six million people with HF and more than 550,000 more are newly diagnosed each year (Schocken, et al., 2008). Therefore, it is important that nursing students learn to manage HF patients in the clinical setting. The theoretical framework used was the one developed by the NLN, &quot;Nursing Education Simulation Framework&quot; which is based on the theoretical and empirical literature in the area of simulation in both the nursing and medical literature. It was developed and tested through the NLN/Laerdal Simulation Study (Jeffries, 2005). <br/>METHODS: Following IRB approval at each institution, 162 students (age 25.7 +/- 6.6; gender =85.5% female) from 3 nursing schools were studied in groups of 5 at the same point in their curriculum using a HF simulation (Laerdal, New York). Tests included a HF knowledge pre-test and post-test after specific stages of the HF simulation (given after the hands on [Post-test 1] and another after debriefing [Post-test 2]). Groups were randomized to Experimental (received simulation after the pre-test) and Control (did not receive simulation until after the first post-test). The knowledge tests consisted of questions regarding care of an acute heart failure patient. <br/>RESULTS: Using paired t-tests, no significant differences in knowledge scores between groups were seen at baseline (pre-test) or at the time of the first post test (p=.06). However, there were significant differences both after the simulation (post-test) and again after the debriefing (post-test 2) for the experimental group (p&lt;0.001). <br/>IMPLICATIONS: This study has shown simulation, in combination with debriefing, to be a useful learning method for the care of the heart failure patient in pre-licensure nursing students. IMPLICATIONS: for this study include providing information on HPS efficacy to educators in both school and acute care settings, which can impact the use and implementation of this very expensive and resource-intensive training technology.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:47:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:47:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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