2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157358
Type:
Presentation
Title:
INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE: PERCEPTIONS, RESPONSES, ACTIONS OF SAMOAN WOMEN
Abstract:
INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE: PERCEPTIONS, RESPONSES, ACTIONS OF SAMOAN WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Shoultz, Jan, DrPH, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa
Title:Professor
Contact Address:2528 McCarthy Mall, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA
Co-Authors:Lois Magnussen
PURPOSE: The purpose of this community based participatory research (CBPR) study was to examine cultural perceptions, responses, and actions recommended by Samoan women about Intimate Partner Violence (IPV).
CONCEPTUAL BASIS: Critical Social Theory provided the conceptual basis for the study.
METHODS: This descriptive study collected both quantitative and qualitative data. The CBPR team of academic and clinical investigators included Samoan women who are staff at the community health center (CHC). All members of the research team prepared for the study by participating in training sessions. The bilingual Samoan research team members recruited participants for the focus group and individual interviews, translated the instruments and transcripts, facilitated the focus group or individual interview, and participated in the analysis of data. Focus group sessions were conducted with Samoan women who may or may not have experienced IPV and taped and transcribed into Samoan and back translated into English and validated with the participants. Individual interviews were conducted with 5 women who had experienced IPV. Findings were validated with the women. Demographic data were also collected. Quantitative data included responses to the Acceptability of Violence Survey. Quantitative analysis included frequencies, means and standard deviations. Content analysis was used to determine themes from the qualitative data.
RESULTS: Samoan women clearly identified IPV and were aware that it occurs in their cultural group. They identified multiple responses of individual women, families and communities to IPV. In Samoa there was a formalized process for addressing this problem that has been disrupted by migration to Hawaii. In both Hawaii and Samoa the systematic cultural response to violence begins at the family level. In Samoa if the abuse continued beyond the ability of the family to control the perpetrator, the Chief would become involved. In Hawaii the pastor of a church may be asked to assist the family instead of a Chief. Samoan women in Hawaii are now utilizing the additional option of calling the police. Nurses and others at the CHC were seen as significant sources of support and information for the women and their families.
IMPLICATIONS: Samoan families have a rich tradition of a collective response to IPV. With migration, some protective factors have been disrupted. Nurses and others working with Samoan women and their families have the potential of providing support, classes, and services at the CHC and with other groups in the community to develop culturally appropriate IPV services for Samoan women and their families. This can improve quality of care and reduce health disparities, a significant challenge for health systems.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleINTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE: PERCEPTIONS, RESPONSES, ACTIONS OF SAMOAN WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157358-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE: PERCEPTIONS, RESPONSES, ACTIONS OF SAMOAN WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shoultz, Jan, DrPH, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2528 McCarthy Mall, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shoultz@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lois Magnussen</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this community based participatory research (CBPR) study was to examine cultural perceptions, responses, and actions recommended by Samoan women about Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). <br/>CONCEPTUAL BASIS: Critical Social Theory provided the conceptual basis for the study. <br/>METHODS: This descriptive study collected both quantitative and qualitative data. The CBPR team of academic and clinical investigators included Samoan women who are staff at the community health center (CHC). All members of the research team prepared for the study by participating in training sessions. The bilingual Samoan research team members recruited participants for the focus group and individual interviews, translated the instruments and transcripts, facilitated the focus group or individual interview, and participated in the analysis of data. Focus group sessions were conducted with Samoan women who may or may not have experienced IPV and taped and transcribed into Samoan and back translated into English and validated with the participants. Individual interviews were conducted with 5 women who had experienced IPV. Findings were validated with the women. Demographic data were also collected. Quantitative data included responses to the Acceptability of Violence Survey. Quantitative analysis included frequencies, means and standard deviations. Content analysis was used to determine themes from the qualitative data. <br/>RESULTS: Samoan women clearly identified IPV and were aware that it occurs in their cultural group. They identified multiple responses of individual women, families and communities to IPV. In Samoa there was a formalized process for addressing this problem that has been disrupted by migration to Hawaii. In both Hawaii and Samoa the systematic cultural response to violence begins at the family level. In Samoa if the abuse continued beyond the ability of the family to control the perpetrator, the Chief would become involved. In Hawaii the pastor of a church may be asked to assist the family instead of a Chief. Samoan women in Hawaii are now utilizing the additional option of calling the police. Nurses and others at the CHC were seen as significant sources of support and information for the women and their families. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Samoan families have a rich tradition of a collective response to IPV. With migration, some protective factors have been disrupted. Nurses and others working with Samoan women and their families have the potential of providing support, classes, and services at the CHC and with other groups in the community to develop culturally appropriate IPV services for Samoan women and their families. This can improve quality of care and reduce health disparities, a significant challenge for health systems.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:48:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:48:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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