2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157360
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SAMOAN HEALTH-WORLD VIEWS AND PERCEIVED RISK FOR DISEASE
Abstract:
SAMOAN HEALTH-WORLD VIEWS AND PERCEIVED RISK FOR DISEASE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Siaki, Leilani Ana Cruz LeonGuerrero, PhD, RN, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Army Nurse Corps
Title:Maj.
Contact Address:92-917 Welo St. unit 107, Kapolei, HI, 96707, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
Describe the relationship between Samoan health-world views and perceived risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes.
1. Explore beliefs, values and images of Samoan health-world views in the context of perceived risk for CVD and diabetes.
2. Identify the ways of knowing within the Samoan health-world views that inform perceived risk for CVD and diabetes.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Health-world views are cognitive orientations that evolve from peoples' attempts to explain phenomena such as health, well-being, disease, and death. Health-world views include beliefs, values, images, and ways of knowing that underlie interpretations of health phenomena and guide health behaviors. Research results linking perceived risk with health behaviors have been inconsistent. A lack of cultural exploration of perceived risk and the use of mainstream populations to develop the majority of health behavior models have been cited as reasons for this inconsistency. Millstein's Process Model of Risk Perception informed by neomodernism and adapted to include health-world views guided this mixed-methods study. Only qualitative results are reported here.
METHODS: Forty-three adult Samoans with metabolic syndrome conditions were recruited from three Churches on the Island of Oahu using a non-probabilistic sampling strategy and the services of a culture broker. Data were collected using audio recorded focus group discussions and analyzed using content analysis supported by Atlas.ti software. Focus group questions were derived from subject matter experts and the health belief, health-world view, perceived risk literature.
RESULTS: This is the first study exploring health-world views in the context of perceived risk for CVD and diabetes in a Pacific Island community, Samoans specifically. Seven general codes: Harmony/balance, physical health, stress, knowledge, personal motivation, personal responsibility, specific perceived risk influences and two culture specific codes: change and food, supported the category health-world view. Five ways of knowing: personal, aesthetic, sociopolitical, empiric, and unknowing and seven values, beliefs, and images: respect, family, religion, harmony/balance, responsibility, health practices, and healthy body image were interwoven among the codes. Although the area of interest was perceived risk for CVD and diabetes, participants also discussed their health-world view in the context of both general overall health and specific conditions such as gout, cancer, and pregnancy. Lack of knowledge about risk factors for disease regarding family history, diet, activity, and environmental conditions was noticeable absent in the data, a finding different from similar research with other minority groups (Asians, Hispanics, and Blacks).
IMPLICATIONS: These results may inform culturally appropriate interventions to reduce health risks in at-risk Samoans and other Pacific Island peoples. Culturally appropriate interventions facilitate the National Institute of Nursing Research (2006) agenda, Healthy People 2010 goals, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality mission
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSAMOAN HEALTH-WORLD VIEWS AND PERCEIVED RISK FOR DISEASEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157360-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SAMOAN HEALTH-WORLD VIEWS AND PERCEIVED RISK FOR DISEASE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Siaki, Leilani Ana Cruz LeonGuerrero, PhD, RN, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Army Nurse Corps</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Maj.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">92-917 Welo St. unit 107, Kapolei, HI, 96707, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leilani.a.siaki@us.army.mil</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>Describe the relationship between Samoan health-world views and perceived risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes.<br/>1. Explore beliefs, values and images of Samoan health-world views in the context of perceived risk for CVD and diabetes.<br/>2. Identify the ways of knowing within the Samoan health-world views that inform perceived risk for CVD and diabetes.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Health-world views are cognitive orientations that evolve from peoples' attempts to explain phenomena such as health, well-being, disease, and death. Health-world views include beliefs, values, images, and ways of knowing that underlie interpretations of health phenomena and guide health behaviors. Research results linking perceived risk with health behaviors have been inconsistent. A lack of cultural exploration of perceived risk and the use of mainstream populations to develop the majority of health behavior models have been cited as reasons for this inconsistency. Millstein's Process Model of Risk Perception informed by neomodernism and adapted to include health-world views guided this mixed-methods study. Only qualitative results are reported here. <br/>METHODS: Forty-three adult Samoans with metabolic syndrome conditions were recruited from three Churches on the Island of Oahu using a non-probabilistic sampling strategy and the services of a culture broker. Data were collected using audio recorded focus group discussions and analyzed using content analysis supported by Atlas.ti software. Focus group questions were derived from subject matter experts and the health belief, health-world view, perceived risk literature. <br/>RESULTS: This is the first study exploring health-world views in the context of perceived risk for CVD and diabetes in a Pacific Island community, Samoans specifically. Seven general codes: Harmony/balance, physical health, stress, knowledge, personal motivation, personal responsibility, specific perceived risk influences and two culture specific codes: change and food, supported the category health-world view. Five ways of knowing: personal, aesthetic, sociopolitical, empiric, and unknowing and seven values, beliefs, and images: respect, family, religion, harmony/balance, responsibility, health practices, and healthy body image were interwoven among the codes. Although the area of interest was perceived risk for CVD and diabetes, participants also discussed their health-world view in the context of both general overall health and specific conditions such as gout, cancer, and pregnancy. Lack of knowledge about risk factors for disease regarding family history, diet, activity, and environmental conditions was noticeable absent in the data, a finding different from similar research with other minority groups (Asians, Hispanics, and Blacks). <br/>IMPLICATIONS: These results may inform culturally appropriate interventions to reduce health risks in at-risk Samoans and other Pacific Island peoples. Culturally appropriate interventions facilitate the National Institute of Nursing Research (2006) agenda, Healthy People 2010 goals, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality mission<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:48:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:48:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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