2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157369
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SOMALI BANTU REUGEES IN SOUTHWEST IDAHO: A COMMUNITY AND CULTURAL ASSESSMENT
Abstract:
SOMALI BANTU REUGEES IN SOUTHWEST IDAHO: A COMMUNITY AND CULTURAL ASSESSMENT
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Springer, Pamela, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Boise State University
Title:Associate Dean, College of Health Sciences/Chair, Nursing
Contact Address:1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725, USA
Co-Authors:Mikal Black; Kim Martz; Cathy Deckys; Terri Soelberg
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this research was to complete a community and cultural assessment of Somali Bantu refugees in XXX, with a focus on their health needs. A descriptive qualitative design using the principles of community based participatory research (CBPR) was used.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
The research was guided by combining a community assessment model, a cultural assessment model, and a vulnerable population framework. "Community as Partner" is a nursing framework focusing on community assessment and the nursing process. Giger & Davidhizar's cultural assessment framework was developed with the belief that practitioners need culturally relevant information to develop appropriate interventions and was used to guide this study. Flaskerud & Winslow's model of vulnerability was also used to enhance the research as the team sought to understand this vulnerable population 1.
METHODS:
The community and cultural assessment was conducted using a literature review, informal encounters with the Somali Bantu community, and formal interviews with the Somali Bantu community members, volunteers who serve the community, and health care providers. The Somali Bantu community speaks primarily two languages; Af Maay Maay and Kizigua. The research team used two interpreters from the community to assist with the informal engagement and formal interviews with the Somali Bantu. Data collection forms for each of the three assessment areas (literature review, informal encounters, and formal interviews) were developed using the theoretical framework as a guide. Formal interview questions were developed by the research team and were then trialed with members of the Somali Bantu community from the advisory board in a committee approach to ensure questions were culturally appropriate. Scholarly data bases were searched for references related to refugee health and Somali Bantu health. A total of thirteen (13) informal visits occurred with each visit lasting one to three hours. Research team members visited with the Somali Bantu in their apartments, attended community functions, and attended English and cooking classes with the Somali Bantu refugees. Twenty-two (22) formal interviews were completed with Somali Bantu community members, volunteers who serve the community and health care providers who treat the African refugees. Trustworthiness of data was maintained by techniques introduced by Guba and Lincoln 2.
RESULTS:
The Somali Bantu refugees are a unique population with substantial health needs. Reliance on traditional healing METHODS: is stronger among females while males are much more apt to accept Western medicine. The Somali Bantu represent a pre-literate population with few members who speak English well enough to adequately interpret making patient education particularly challenging.
IMPLICATIONS:
Somali Bantu are collective decision makers and are very social visiting each other and sharing information freely in an effort to understand health concerns. Nurses need to be aware of these characteristics to effectively utilize social networks in health education. Overall findings revealed a vulnerable population at high risk for health disparities.
1. Flaskerud, J. H., &t Winslow, B. J. (1998). Conceptualizing vulnerable populations health-related research. Nursing Research, 47(2), 69-78.
2. Guba, E. & Lincoln, Y (1989). Fourth Generation Evaluation. Sage Publications: Newbury Park, CA.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSOMALI BANTU REUGEES IN SOUTHWEST IDAHO: A COMMUNITY AND CULTURAL ASSESSMENTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157369-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SOMALI BANTU REUGEES IN SOUTHWEST IDAHO: A COMMUNITY AND CULTURAL ASSESSMENT</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Springer, Pamela, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boise State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean, College of Health Sciences/Chair, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pspring@boisestate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mikal Black; Kim Martz; Cathy Deckys; Terri Soelberg</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purpose of this research was to complete a community and cultural assessment of Somali Bantu refugees in XXX, with a focus on their health needs. A descriptive qualitative design using the principles of community based participatory research (CBPR) was used. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>The research was guided by combining a community assessment model, a cultural assessment model, and a vulnerable population framework. &quot;Community as Partner&quot; is a nursing framework focusing on community assessment and the nursing process. Giger &amp; Davidhizar's cultural assessment framework was developed with the belief that practitioners need culturally relevant information to develop appropriate interventions and was used to guide this study. Flaskerud &amp; Winslow's model of vulnerability was also used to enhance the research as the team sought to understand this vulnerable population 1.<br/>METHODS: <br/>The community and cultural assessment was conducted using a literature review, informal encounters with the Somali Bantu community, and formal interviews with the Somali Bantu community members, volunteers who serve the community, and health care providers. The Somali Bantu community speaks primarily two languages; Af Maay Maay and Kizigua. The research team used two interpreters from the community to assist with the informal engagement and formal interviews with the Somali Bantu. Data collection forms for each of the three assessment areas (literature review, informal encounters, and formal interviews) were developed using the theoretical framework as a guide. Formal interview questions were developed by the research team and were then trialed with members of the Somali Bantu community from the advisory board in a committee approach to ensure questions were culturally appropriate. Scholarly data bases were searched for references related to refugee health and Somali Bantu health. A total of thirteen (13) informal visits occurred with each visit lasting one to three hours. Research team members visited with the Somali Bantu in their apartments, attended community functions, and attended English and cooking classes with the Somali Bantu refugees. Twenty-two (22) formal interviews were completed with Somali Bantu community members, volunteers who serve the community and health care providers who treat the African refugees. Trustworthiness of data was maintained by techniques introduced by Guba and Lincoln 2.<br/>RESULTS: <br/>The Somali Bantu refugees are a unique population with substantial health needs. Reliance on traditional healing METHODS: is stronger among females while males are much more apt to accept Western medicine. The Somali Bantu represent a pre-literate population with few members who speak English well enough to adequately interpret making patient education particularly challenging. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Somali Bantu are collective decision makers and are very social visiting each other and sharing information freely in an effort to understand health concerns. Nurses need to be aware of these characteristics to effectively utilize social networks in health education. Overall findings revealed a vulnerable population at high risk for health disparities. <br/>1. Flaskerud, J. H., &amp;t Winslow, B. J. (1998). Conceptualizing vulnerable populations health-related research. Nursing Research, 47(2), 69-78.<br/>2. Guba, E. &amp; Lincoln, Y (1989). Fourth Generation Evaluation. Sage Publications: Newbury Park, CA.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:48:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:48:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.