SELF-EFFICACY AND DISCLOSURE OF HIV POSITIVE SEROSTATUS TO SEX PARTNERS: A FEMALE STUDY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157370
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SELF-EFFICACY AND DISCLOSURE OF HIV POSITIVE SEROSTATUS TO SEX PARTNERS: A FEMALE STUDY
Abstract:
SELF-EFFICACY AND DISCLOSURE OF HIV POSITIVE SEROSTATUS TO SEX PARTNERS: A FEMALE STUDY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Sullivan, Kathleen, PhD, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:McCarthy Mall,, Webster 328, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA
Co-Authors:Joachim G. Voss; Dongmei Li
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The aims of the research included: 1) describe self-disclosure of HIV - positive serostatus to most recent sex partners among an ethnically diverse sample of women living in Hawai'i and Seattle, Washington; 2) explore relationships between demographic, HIV-illness, self-efficacy, substance use and SP variables and self-disclosure; and, 3) examine the relationship between disclosure and condom use with most recent sex partners.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory guided this multi-site study with a specific focus on self-efficacy for HIV disclosure decision-making and for negotiating safe sex. Valid and reliable instruments were used to measure perceived efficacy in these context-specific domains. National data indicates that women living with HIV disease have difficulties disclosing their serostatus to sex partners and using condoms consistently. Little is known about disclosure practices or women from Hawaii or Seattle, Washington.
METHODS:
A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used and data was collected using surveys for assessing up-to-three most-recent sex partner experiences during the past year.
RESULTS:
Eighty four (N = 84) women reported a total of 129 most recent SPs, with an overall disclosure rate of 74% and condom use rate of 60%. Women with higher self-efficacy for knowing when it was safe to disclose were more likely to disclose to recent sex partners. Disclosure rate varied by relationship status and serostatus of SPs and disclosure was associated with condom use but in a negative direction. Women who disclosed were significantly less likely to use a condom with most-recent sex partners, and women from Washington were marginally more likely to use condoms than women from Hawaii (p = .066). Condom use was significantly more likely in casual/anonymous relationships than with committed partners and among women with higher self-efficacy scores for discussing the need to practice safer sex. The lowest rate of condom use was among Hawaiian/Part-Hawaiian females.
IMPLICATIONS:
Health care personnel should routinely discuss issues of disclosure to SPs with female seropositive clients, and offer strategies that can enhance their behavioral intentions to use condoms. Culturally tailored interventions focused specifically on strengthening self-efficacy beliefs for disclosure and for safer sex decision-making are needed, especially in committed partner relationships.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSELF-EFFICACY AND DISCLOSURE OF HIV POSITIVE SEROSTATUS TO SEX PARTNERS: A FEMALE STUDYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157370-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SELF-EFFICACY AND DISCLOSURE OF HIV POSITIVE SEROSTATUS TO SEX PARTNERS: A FEMALE STUDY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sullivan, Kathleen, PhD, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">McCarthy Mall,, Webster 328, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksulliva@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joachim G. Voss; Dongmei Li</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The aims of the research included: 1) describe self-disclosure of HIV - positive serostatus to most recent sex partners among an ethnically diverse sample of women living in Hawai'i and Seattle, Washington; 2) explore relationships between demographic, HIV-illness, self-efficacy, substance use and SP variables and self-disclosure; and, 3) examine the relationship between disclosure and condom use with most recent sex partners. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory guided this multi-site study with a specific focus on self-efficacy for HIV disclosure decision-making and for negotiating safe sex. Valid and reliable instruments were used to measure perceived efficacy in these context-specific domains. National data indicates that women living with HIV disease have difficulties disclosing their serostatus to sex partners and using condoms consistently. Little is known about disclosure practices or women from Hawaii or Seattle, Washington. <br/>METHODS: <br/>A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used and data was collected using surveys for assessing up-to-three most-recent sex partner experiences during the past year. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>Eighty four (N = 84) women reported a total of 129 most recent SPs, with an overall disclosure rate of 74% and condom use rate of 60%. Women with higher self-efficacy for knowing when it was safe to disclose were more likely to disclose to recent sex partners. Disclosure rate varied by relationship status and serostatus of SPs and disclosure was associated with condom use but in a negative direction. Women who disclosed were significantly less likely to use a condom with most-recent sex partners, and women from Washington were marginally more likely to use condoms than women from Hawaii (p = .066). Condom use was significantly more likely in casual/anonymous relationships than with committed partners and among women with higher self-efficacy scores for discussing the need to practice safer sex. The lowest rate of condom use was among Hawaiian/Part-Hawaiian females. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Health care personnel should routinely discuss issues of disclosure to SPs with female seropositive clients, and offer strategies that can enhance their behavioral intentions to use condoms. Culturally tailored interventions focused specifically on strengthening self-efficacy beliefs for disclosure and for safer sex decision-making are needed, especially in committed partner relationships.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:48:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:48:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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