2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157373
Type:
Presentation
Title:
GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION FOR HYPERTENSION AMONG AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Abstract:
GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION FOR HYPERTENSION AMONG AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Taylor, Jacquelyn, PhD, PNP-BC, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Yale University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:100 Church Street South, Room 295, New Haven, CT, 06513, USA
Co-Authors:Yan V. Sun; Steven C. Hunt; Sharon L.R. Kardia
PURPOSES/AIMS:
Hypertension and obesity disparities are prominent among African American women. This study will examine body mass index (BMI) as a partial internal environment in the gene-environment interaction for hypertension in African American women across 2 generations. The purpose of this study is to examine BMI as a partial internal environment in the gene-environment interaction for hypertension in African American women across the lifespan.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
African American women have the highest prevalence of hypertension and obesity than any other group in the United States. African American girls have the highest incidence of obesity than any other children in the nation, and hypertension diagnosis has been rising. Because both genetic heredity and BMI are important risk factors for hypertension, this study examined the gene-BMI interaction for hypertension in 2 generations of African American women.
METHODS:
This study was comprised of 868 female African-American participants in the parent cohort and 322 female African-American participants in the offspring cohort from the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN) study, part of the Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP). Genes were selected to represent biological pathways or positional candidate genes from systems known to be associated with hypertension, and previous linkage study. A total of 115 SNPs were evaluated among the parent cohort, and 491 SNPs were evaluated among the offspring cohort for tests of SNP-BMI interaction using methods of false discovery rate (<.20) and examination of minor allele frequency (>.05) and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (>.10).
RESULTS:
One SNP (located in the CAPN 13 gene, rs1879282) passed adjustments for multiple testing mentioned above and had a significant (p <0.01) gene-BMI interaction on both systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) among African American female offspring. The rs1879282 SNP is located on chromosome 2 on the calpain (CAPN) 13 gene which is part of a family of cytosolic calcium-activated proteases involved in apoptosis, cell division, modulation of integrin-cytoskeletal interactions, and synaptic plasticity. This SNP was not available for testing in the African American parent cohort.
IMPLICATIONS:
Identification of the CAPN13_rs1879282 SNP as a risk factor for increases in SBP and DBP in normotensive African American offspring is clinically important when considering early interventions and appropriate prevention plans. Early detection of genetic and environmental influences to hypertension development may help to reduce hypertension and obesity health disparities among African American women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION FOR HYPERTENSION AMONG AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157373-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION FOR HYPERTENSION AMONG AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Taylor, Jacquelyn, PhD, PNP-BC, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yale University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">100 Church Street South, Room 295, New Haven, CT, 06513, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jacquelyn.taylor@yale.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Yan V. Sun; Steven C. Hunt; Sharon L.R. Kardia</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>Hypertension and obesity disparities are prominent among African American women. This study will examine body mass index (BMI) as a partial internal environment in the gene-environment interaction for hypertension in African American women across 2 generations. The purpose of this study is to examine BMI as a partial internal environment in the gene-environment interaction for hypertension in African American women across the lifespan. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>African American women have the highest prevalence of hypertension and obesity than any other group in the United States. African American girls have the highest incidence of obesity than any other children in the nation, and hypertension diagnosis has been rising. Because both genetic heredity and BMI are important risk factors for hypertension, this study examined the gene-BMI interaction for hypertension in 2 generations of African American women.<br/>METHODS: <br/>This study was comprised of 868 female African-American participants in the parent cohort and 322 female African-American participants in the offspring cohort from the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN) study, part of the Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP). Genes were selected to represent biological pathways or positional candidate genes from systems known to be associated with hypertension, and previous linkage study. A total of 115 SNPs were evaluated among the parent cohort, and 491 SNPs were evaluated among the offspring cohort for tests of SNP-BMI interaction using methods of false discovery rate (&lt;.20) and examination of minor allele frequency (&gt;.05) and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (&gt;.10).<br/>RESULTS: <br/>One SNP (located in the CAPN 13 gene, rs1879282) passed adjustments for multiple testing mentioned above and had a significant (p &lt;0.01) gene-BMI interaction on both systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) among African American female offspring. The rs1879282 SNP is located on chromosome 2 on the calpain (CAPN) 13 gene which is part of a family of cytosolic calcium-activated proteases involved in apoptosis, cell division, modulation of integrin-cytoskeletal interactions, and synaptic plasticity. This SNP was not available for testing in the African American parent cohort.<br/>IMPLICATIONS:<br/>Identification of the CAPN13_rs1879282 SNP as a risk factor for increases in SBP and DBP in normotensive African American offspring is clinically important when considering early interventions and appropriate prevention plans. Early detection of genetic and environmental influences to hypertension development may help to reduce hypertension and obesity health disparities among African American women.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:48:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:48:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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