2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157374
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SCREENING FOR A TAI CHI EXERCISE INTERVENTION IN STROKE SURVIVORS
Abstract:
SCREENING FOR A TAI CHI EXERCISE INTERVENTION IN STROKE SURVIVORS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Taylor-Piliae, Ruth, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1305 N. Martin Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA
BACKGROUND: Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability among adults in the United States. The financial impact of stroke is enormous, estimated at $65.5 billion in 2008. Physical activity is central in comprehensive stroke rehabilitation programs to reduce disability, and can be costly when not covered by health insurance. Tai Chi is a low-cost exercise program that is safe for persons with chronic diseases or disabilities. Prior physical activity intervention studies among stroke survivors indicate that only 20-25% of potential subjects will be interested and eligible in participating, due to physical disabilities or cognitive impairments.
OBJECTIVE: Screening for a 12-week program of Tai Chi in adult stroke survivors, for an experimental 2-group pre-test post-test study.
METHODS: Potential subjects recruited from four different outpatient stroke rehabilitation centers were pre-screened by phone. Eligible subjects included men and women, aged 50 years and older, diagnosed with ischemic stroke, and at least 3 months post-stroke. Screening measures to assess study eligibility and safety included: the Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) to assess functional disability, the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) to assess balance, gait speed, and lower body strength, and the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) to assess cognitive impairment. Subjects with a mRS score of 3 or less, a SPPB score of 3 to 9, and a MMSE score of 18 or greater were eligible for study participation, even if they had hemiparesis or aphasia.
RESULTS: As of October 1, 2009, a total of 77 persons showed interested in the study. Persons pre-screened by phone (n=67) were on average 68 years old (range 47-89 years), 48% women, 94% were at least 3 months post-stroke and willing to be randomized. Reported cardiovascular risk factors were 60% hypertension, 24% diabetes, 8% smokers, and 54% hypercholesterolemia. A total of 49 subjects consented to be screened, and reported mild to moderate disability (mRS mean=2 +/- 0.8). On average, subjects had some impairments in physical functioning (SPPB mean=7.1 +/- 2.7), but were without cognitive impairments (MMSE mean=27.3 +/- 3.2). Following screening, 37 subjects were found eligible for study participation. Reasons for ineligibility included: SPPB <3 (n=2), SPPB >9 (n=8), MMSE <18 (n=1), and no prior stroke (n=1). Approximately 48% of interested persons were found eligible for study participation.
SIGNIFICANCE: Tai Chi is a low-tech, low-impact, moderate-intensity exercise that may offer significant physical functioning and health-related quality of life benefits beyond traditional stroke rehabilitation programs. This study is one of the first of its kind to systematically test this possibility. The RESULTS: from this, and larger projects, have the potential to significantly reduce the negative impact of stroke disabilities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSCREENING FOR A TAI CHI EXERCISE INTERVENTION IN STROKE SURVIVORSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157374-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SCREENING FOR A TAI CHI EXERCISE INTERVENTION IN STROKE SURVIVORS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Taylor-Piliae, Ruth, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1305 N. Martin Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rtaylor@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability among adults in the United States. The financial impact of stroke is enormous, estimated at $65.5 billion in 2008. Physical activity is central in comprehensive stroke rehabilitation programs to reduce disability, and can be costly when not covered by health insurance. Tai Chi is a low-cost exercise program that is safe for persons with chronic diseases or disabilities. Prior physical activity intervention studies among stroke survivors indicate that only 20-25% of potential subjects will be interested and eligible in participating, due to physical disabilities or cognitive impairments. <br/>OBJECTIVE: Screening for a 12-week program of Tai Chi in adult stroke survivors, for an experimental 2-group pre-test post-test study. <br/>METHODS: Potential subjects recruited from four different outpatient stroke rehabilitation centers were pre-screened by phone. Eligible subjects included men and women, aged 50 years and older, diagnosed with ischemic stroke, and at least 3 months post-stroke. Screening measures to assess study eligibility and safety included: the Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) to assess functional disability, the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) to assess balance, gait speed, and lower body strength, and the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) to assess cognitive impairment. Subjects with a mRS score of 3 or less, a SPPB score of 3 to 9, and a MMSE score of 18 or greater were eligible for study participation, even if they had hemiparesis or aphasia. <br/>RESULTS: As of October 1, 2009, a total of 77 persons showed interested in the study. Persons pre-screened by phone (n=67) were on average 68 years old (range 47-89 years), 48% women, 94% were at least 3 months post-stroke and willing to be randomized. Reported cardiovascular risk factors were 60% hypertension, 24% diabetes, 8% smokers, and 54% hypercholesterolemia. A total of 49 subjects consented to be screened, and reported mild to moderate disability (mRS mean=2 +/- 0.8). On average, subjects had some impairments in physical functioning (SPPB mean=7.1 +/- 2.7), but were without cognitive impairments (MMSE mean=27.3 +/- 3.2). Following screening, 37 subjects were found eligible for study participation. Reasons for ineligibility included: SPPB &lt;3 (n=2), SPPB &gt;9 (n=8), MMSE &lt;18 (n=1), and no prior stroke (n=1). Approximately 48% of interested persons were found eligible for study participation. <br/>SIGNIFICANCE: Tai Chi is a low-tech, low-impact, moderate-intensity exercise that may offer significant physical functioning and health-related quality of life benefits beyond traditional stroke rehabilitation programs. This study is one of the first of its kind to systematically test this possibility. The RESULTS: from this, and larger projects, have the potential to significantly reduce the negative impact of stroke disabilities.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:48:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:48:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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