ADAPTATION OF AN EFFICACIOUS PREVENTION PROGRAM FOR AT-RISK MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTH

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157375
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ADAPTATION OF AN EFFICACIOUS PREVENTION PROGRAM FOR AT-RISK MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTH
Abstract:
ADAPTATION OF AN EFFICACIOUS PREVENTION PROGRAM FOR AT-RISK MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTH
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Thomas-Jones, Deborah, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Project Director
Contact Address:Building #29, 6200 NE 74th Street, Seattle, WA, 98155, USA
Co-Authors:Elaine Adams Thompson; Carole Hooven
PURPOSE: This study evaluates the feasibility (acceptability, practicability, developmental congruence) and effectiveness of adapting a multi-faceted prevention program (Coping And Support Training or CAST) for middle school youth, originally designed for high school youth. The central aim was to systematically evaluate modifications in the content and structure of this evidence-based prevention program for reducing health risk behaviors. In this research, at-risk youth are defined as teens at risk for school failure or school dropout, a risk status associated with negative adolescent mental health outcomes including depression, anger/aggressiveness, and suicidal behaviors.
BACKGROUND: Successful translation of health prevention efforts will almost always require systematic adaptation of an established program for community use, which is the crux of this study. Children who struggle in school, have difficulties self-regulating and who lack educational supports show sustained mental health problems across time. Emerging evidence suggests that prevention of school failure is likely to be effective not only in reducing school failure, but also in decreasing adolescent involvement in health risk behaviors. To address the critical needs among middle school youth, developmental adaption of the CAST program was needed in order to launch this evidence-based intervention for middle school youth.
METHODS: Research procedures received University IRB approval. Multiple METHODS: were used to examine feasibility and effectiveness, including comparison of the implementation fidelity data with original program data, expert consultation, and analysis of process data completed by youth, group leaders and external observer. Sample. The sample includes over 200 at-risk youth who have participated in a school-based prevention program. Based on school record data and using a tested algorithm, youth were identified and invited to participate. Written parental consent and youth assent were gathered in advance. Measures. Process evaluation measures used to assess feasibility include program-specific indicators of Content Evaluation, Personal & Social Skills, & Group Support. Preliminary outcome effectiveness measures were based on standard measures of youth depression (adapted CES-D), anger/aggressiveness (drawn from national youth surveys), and perceived school climate. Analysis. Qualitative analyses and descriptive statistics, consonant with the adaptation process, are used to practicality, acceptability and developmental congruence of the adaptation. Appropriate statistical tests are used for comparative analyses (e.g., ANOVA, regression, non-parametric tests).
RESULTS: Comparative findings show similar implementation patterns across middle and high school populations, indicating consistency in content and structure of the adapted program. Also reflective of the adaptation are preliminary findings of intervention effectiveness; intervention vs. control group youth show decreasing trends in depression (b=-.29, p<.06), mixed outcomes for anger/aggression, and increasing personal control (b=.31, p<.02) and problem-solving coping (b=.91, p<.001) and improved school climate (b=.24, p<.03). Discussion will focus on findings, links between indicators and adaptation evaluation, and challenges inherent in adaptation.
IMPLICATIONS: The findings are directly relevant to the practice for a range of nurses including community health and school nurses, nurse practitioners, and more broadly for health educators seeking to select and adapt evidence-based programs for practice.
This research is funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research, R01NR008914

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleADAPTATION OF AN EFFICACIOUS PREVENTION PROGRAM FOR AT-RISK MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTHen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157375-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ADAPTATION OF AN EFFICACIOUS PREVENTION PROGRAM FOR AT-RISK MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTH</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thomas-Jones, Deborah, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Project Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Building #29, 6200 NE 74th Street, Seattle, WA, 98155, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">debitj@uw.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elaine Adams Thompson; Carole Hooven</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: This study evaluates the feasibility (acceptability, practicability, developmental congruence) and effectiveness of adapting a multi-faceted prevention program (Coping And Support Training or CAST) for middle school youth, originally designed for high school youth. The central aim was to systematically evaluate modifications in the content and structure of this evidence-based prevention program for reducing health risk behaviors. In this research, at-risk youth are defined as teens at risk for school failure or school dropout, a risk status associated with negative adolescent mental health outcomes including depression, anger/aggressiveness, and suicidal behaviors.<br/>BACKGROUND: Successful translation of health prevention efforts will almost always require systematic adaptation of an established program for community use, which is the crux of this study. Children who struggle in school, have difficulties self-regulating and who lack educational supports show sustained mental health problems across time. Emerging evidence suggests that prevention of school failure is likely to be effective not only in reducing school failure, but also in decreasing adolescent involvement in health risk behaviors. To address the critical needs among middle school youth, developmental adaption of the CAST program was needed in order to launch this evidence-based intervention for middle school youth.<br/>METHODS: Research procedures received University IRB approval. Multiple METHODS: were used to examine feasibility and effectiveness, including comparison of the implementation fidelity data with original program data, expert consultation, and analysis of process data completed by youth, group leaders and external observer. Sample. The sample includes over 200 at-risk youth who have participated in a school-based prevention program. Based on school record data and using a tested algorithm, youth were identified and invited to participate. Written parental consent and youth assent were gathered in advance. Measures. Process evaluation measures used to assess feasibility include program-specific indicators of Content Evaluation, Personal &amp; Social Skills, &amp; Group Support. Preliminary outcome effectiveness measures were based on standard measures of youth depression (adapted CES-D), anger/aggressiveness (drawn from national youth surveys), and perceived school climate. Analysis. Qualitative analyses and descriptive statistics, consonant with the adaptation process, are used to practicality, acceptability and developmental congruence of the adaptation. Appropriate statistical tests are used for comparative analyses (e.g., ANOVA, regression, non-parametric tests).<br/>RESULTS: Comparative findings show similar implementation patterns across middle and high school populations, indicating consistency in content and structure of the adapted program. Also reflective of the adaptation are preliminary findings of intervention effectiveness; intervention vs. control group youth show decreasing trends in depression (b=-.29, p&lt;.06), mixed outcomes for anger/aggression, and increasing personal control (b=.31, p&lt;.02) and problem-solving coping (b=.91, p&lt;.001) and improved school climate (b=.24, p&lt;.03). Discussion will focus on findings, links between indicators and adaptation evaluation, and challenges inherent in adaptation.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: The findings are directly relevant to the practice for a range of nurses including community health and school nurses, nurse practitioners, and more broadly for health educators seeking to select and adapt evidence-based programs for practice. <br/>This research is funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research, R01NR008914<br/> <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:48:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:48:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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