2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157376
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DIFFERENCES IN GENDER PERCEPTIONS TO PARTICIPATING IN SCHOOL PE ACTIVITIES
Abstract:
DIFFERENCES IN GENDER PERCEPTIONS TO PARTICIPATING IN SCHOOL PE ACTIVITIES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Thomason, Diane L., PhD, MN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:San Diego State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA, 92182-4158, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this study was to determine and describe perceptual differences between male and female high school studentsÆ attitudes about factors that influence their school physical education (PE) participation. The six domains measured were: Self-efficacy, PE Enjoyment, Personal Factors, Behavioral Control, Barriers, and Social Norms.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Physical activity plays a critical role in the health and development of children and youth and schools have traditionally provided American youth with physical activity opportunities. Recent studies have reported a decline in adolescent school PE activities. One explanation for the decreasing levels of physical activity during adolescence is the number of perceived deterrents that make it difficult to participate in PE activities. However, the factors deterring PE participation are likely to be somewhat different for males and females.
METHODS:
RESULTS: of t tests from the Physical Education Activities Scale (PEAS), a 41 item scale using the Ecological framework, was used to describe perceived differences between the genders in a sample of high school adolescents (N=439) from two urban high schools in each of the six domains.
RESULTS:
There were significant differences in gender perceptions of what influenced PE activity participation overall (p < .001) and in each of the six domains (p <.05). Females perceived fewer overall positive environmental influences in school related to PE participation (M= 7.89) than males (M= 8.56). In the six domains, females perceived deterrents to PE participation included perceptions of less skill and competency to perform activities (Self-efficacy); PE as not being fun, but boring (Personal Enjoyment); not being offered activities they liked, not being able to use new equipment (Behavioral Control); not being able to choose the activity (Personal Factor); being embarrassed with their bodies, not liking the teacher choosing the activities (Barrier), as well as parents and peers negative attitudes towards PE ( Social Norms).
IMPLICATIONS:
The RESULTS: suggest that strategies to address specific intrapersonal, interpersonal and social-environmental deterrents to PE activity participation
should be considered in PE activity programs for adolescent girls.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDIFFERENCES IN GENDER PERCEPTIONS TO PARTICIPATING IN SCHOOL PE ACTIVITIESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157376-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">DIFFERENCES IN GENDER PERCEPTIONS TO PARTICIPATING IN SCHOOL PE ACTIVITIES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thomason, Diane L., PhD, MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Diego State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA, 92182-4158, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dthomaso@mail.sdsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purpose of this study was to determine and describe perceptual differences between male and female high school students&AElig; attitudes about factors that influence their school physical education (PE) participation. The six domains measured were: Self-efficacy, PE Enjoyment, Personal Factors, Behavioral Control, Barriers, and Social Norms. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Physical activity plays a critical role in the health and development of children and youth and schools have traditionally provided American youth with physical activity opportunities. Recent studies have reported a decline in adolescent school PE activities. One explanation for the decreasing levels of physical activity during adolescence is the number of perceived deterrents that make it difficult to participate in PE activities. However, the factors deterring PE participation are likely to be somewhat different for males and females.<br/>METHODS: <br/>RESULTS: of t tests from the Physical Education Activities Scale (PEAS), a 41 item scale using the Ecological framework, was used to describe perceived differences between the genders in a sample of high school adolescents (N=439) from two urban high schools in each of the six domains.<br/>RESULTS: <br/>There were significant differences in gender perceptions of what influenced PE activity participation overall (p &lt; .001) and in each of the six domains (p &lt;.05). Females perceived fewer overall positive environmental influences in school related to PE participation (M= 7.89) than males (M= 8.56). In the six domains, females perceived deterrents to PE participation included perceptions of less skill and competency to perform activities (Self-efficacy); PE as not being fun, but boring (Personal Enjoyment); not being offered activities they liked, not being able to use new equipment (Behavioral Control); not being able to choose the activity (Personal Factor); being embarrassed with their bodies, not liking the teacher choosing the activities (Barrier), as well as parents and peers negative attitudes towards PE ( Social Norms).<br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>The RESULTS: suggest that strategies to address specific intrapersonal, interpersonal and social-environmental deterrents to PE activity participation<br/>should be considered in PE activity programs for adolescent girls.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:49:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:49:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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