2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157379
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PAIN AND SYMPTOM EXPERIENCES IN HISPANIC CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH CANCER
Abstract:
PAIN AND SYMPTOM EXPERIENCES IN HISPANIC CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH CANCER
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Tomas, Ana Beatriz, BS(c)
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles
Title:RN-Bridge Student
Contact Address:700 Tiverton Avenue; 5-942 Factor, Box 956919, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6919, USA
Co-Authors:Jacqueline Marroquin; Eufemia Jacob; Lupita Diaz
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to examine the pain and symptoms experiences from the Spanish speaking parent's perspective, and evaluate the effect of pain and symptoms on the quality of life in children and adolescents with cancer.
BACKGROUND: The language barrier increases the risk for underassessment and under treatment of pain in non-English speaking populations. The UCSF Symptom Management Model was used to guide the selection of variables, including quality of life, which is one of the outcomes of pain in this model.
METHODS: Parents of children and adolescents with cancer participated in a 30 to 60 minute interview, which occurred in the hospital and focused on questions about pain, difficulties and problems with reporting pain and symptoms, ability to communicate with clinicians about pain and symptoms and how pain affect quality of life of their child/adolescent. At the end of the interview, parents were asked to evaluate their childÆs quality of life using the Spanish version of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL).
RESULTS: Parent participants (n=9) had a mean age of 38 +/- 6.0; 1 was male and 8 were females. Collectively, their children were 3 toddlers (2-4 years), 3 school age children (8-12 years), and 3 adolescents (13-18 years). The most common cancer diagnoses were leukemia and sarcomas. In comparison to toddlers (2-4 years) and adolescents (13-18 years), school age children (8-12 years) had the lowest mean quality of life scores in the four core dimensions of health: physical, emotional, social, and role functioning. The mean scores were 48.9, 40.0, 48.3, and 45.0 respectively. The physical subscale of the PedsQL included general fatigue scores, which was the most problematic symptom in all age groups. The mean fatigue scores were 56.9 +/- 2.4 (toddlers), 44.4+/- 20.5 (school age children), and 51.4 ¦ 15.7 (adolescents). No significant differences were found in the reported quality of life scores between those with pain (49.9 +/- 13.5) and those without pain (64.7 +/- 11.4, p>0.05), mostly due to the small sample size.
IMPLICATIONS: for Practice: The Spanish version of the instruments allowed parents to communicate about pain, fatigue, and symptoms, and how these symptoms affect the quality of life in Hispanic children and adolescents. Research is needed to determine the utility of these instruments in clinical practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePAIN AND SYMPTOM EXPERIENCES IN HISPANIC CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH CANCERen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157379-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PAIN AND SYMPTOM EXPERIENCES IN HISPANIC CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH CANCER</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tomas, Ana Beatriz, BS(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN-Bridge Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">700 Tiverton Avenue; 5-942 Factor, Box 956919, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6919, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Boxhaul24@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jacqueline Marroquin; Eufemia Jacob; Lupita Diaz</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to examine the pain and symptoms experiences from the Spanish speaking parent's perspective, and evaluate the effect of pain and symptoms on the quality of life in children and adolescents with cancer. <br/>BACKGROUND: The language barrier increases the risk for underassessment and under treatment of pain in non-English speaking populations. The UCSF Symptom Management Model was used to guide the selection of variables, including quality of life, which is one of the outcomes of pain in this model. <br/>METHODS: Parents of children and adolescents with cancer participated in a 30 to 60 minute interview, which occurred in the hospital and focused on questions about pain, difficulties and problems with reporting pain and symptoms, ability to communicate with clinicians about pain and symptoms and how pain affect quality of life of their child/adolescent. At the end of the interview, parents were asked to evaluate their child&AElig;s quality of life using the Spanish version of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). <br/>RESULTS: Parent participants (n=9) had a mean age of 38 +/- 6.0; 1 was male and 8 were females. Collectively, their children were 3 toddlers (2-4 years), 3 school age children (8-12 years), and 3 adolescents (13-18 years). The most common cancer diagnoses were leukemia and sarcomas. In comparison to toddlers (2-4 years) and adolescents (13-18 years), school age children (8-12 years) had the lowest mean quality of life scores in the four core dimensions of health: physical, emotional, social, and role functioning. The mean scores were 48.9, 40.0, 48.3, and 45.0 respectively. The physical subscale of the PedsQL included general fatigue scores, which was the most problematic symptom in all age groups. The mean fatigue scores were 56.9 +/- 2.4 (toddlers), 44.4+/- 20.5 (school age children), and 51.4 &brvbar; 15.7 (adolescents). No significant differences were found in the reported quality of life scores between those with pain (49.9 +/- 13.5) and those without pain (64.7 +/- 11.4, p&gt;0.05), mostly due to the small sample size.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: for Practice: The Spanish version of the instruments allowed parents to communicate about pain, fatigue, and symptoms, and how these symptoms affect the quality of life in Hispanic children and adolescents. Research is needed to determine the utility of these instruments in clinical practice.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:49:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:49:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.