2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157380
Type:
Presentation
Title:
RE-EVALUATION OF THE MASLACH BURNOUT INVENTORY HUMAN SERVICES SURVEY
Abstract:
RE-EVALUATION OF THE MASLACH BURNOUT INVENTORY HUMAN SERVICES SURVEY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Tourangeau, Ann E., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:130-155 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5T 1P8, Canada
Co-Authors:Greta Cummings; Lisa Cranley
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purposes of this paper are to re-examine the psychometric properties of the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and to identify a more relevant and current instrument to measure burnout with nurses that is based on strong conceptual groundwork.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The MBI-HSS has frequently been used in research involving nurses, their work environments and their responses to these work environments. The MBI-HSS was founded on the three hypothesized components of burnout: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. Although this has been a remarkably stable instrument, psychometric testing of the MBI-HSS with a recent large nurse sample yielded different psychometric properties than expected.
METHODS: A large sample of 4,024 Canadian registered nurses completed the MBI-HSS as part of a larger nurse survey examining determinants of nurse retention. Entering all 22 original items of the MBI-HSS, an exploratory principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation yielded a 4-factor solution rather than the anticipated 3 factors. A second factor analysis was implemented including only those of the 22-items with factor loadings greater than .50 and that did not double load on any other factor loading more than .35. Conceptual examination and reliability testing was completed on those remaining items in the instrument.
RESULTS: Three iterations of factor analyses and reliability testing yielded a shorter 16-item instrument with three distinguishable and conceptually relevant subscales that clearly aligned with the original subscales: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. These three factors explained 59.8 percent of variance. Alpha coefficients for the three scales ranged from .72 to .91.
IMPLICATIONS: Completion of instruments in practice and in research carries a significant respondent burden. In research, longer instruments also incur considerable data coding and data entry costs. Furthermore, because instruments may be time-bound, instrument psychometric properties should be reevaluated regularly to ensure relevance and soundness of psychometric properties. A shorter version of a well-used instrument to measure nurse burnout is suggested. This instrument may be useful for researcher use, for administrators who measure work-related burnout of nurse employees, and for nurses who complete surveys measuring burnout.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRE-EVALUATION OF THE MASLACH BURNOUT INVENTORY HUMAN SERVICES SURVEYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157380-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">RE-EVALUATION OF THE MASLACH BURNOUT INVENTORY HUMAN SERVICES SURVEY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tourangeau, Ann E., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">130-155 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5T 1P8, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ann.tourangeau@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Greta Cummings; Lisa Cranley</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purposes of this paper are to re-examine the psychometric properties of the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and to identify a more relevant and current instrument to measure burnout with nurses that is based on strong conceptual groundwork.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The MBI-HSS has frequently been used in research involving nurses, their work environments and their responses to these work environments. The MBI-HSS was founded on the three hypothesized components of burnout: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. Although this has been a remarkably stable instrument, psychometric testing of the MBI-HSS with a recent large nurse sample yielded different psychometric properties than expected. <br/>METHODS: A large sample of 4,024 Canadian registered nurses completed the MBI-HSS as part of a larger nurse survey examining determinants of nurse retention. Entering all 22 original items of the MBI-HSS, an exploratory principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation yielded a 4-factor solution rather than the anticipated 3 factors. A second factor analysis was implemented including only those of the 22-items with factor loadings greater than .50 and that did not double load on any other factor loading more than .35. Conceptual examination and reliability testing was completed on those remaining items in the instrument. <br/>RESULTS: Three iterations of factor analyses and reliability testing yielded a shorter 16-item instrument with three distinguishable and conceptually relevant subscales that clearly aligned with the original subscales: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. These three factors explained 59.8 percent of variance. Alpha coefficients for the three scales ranged from .72 to .91. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Completion of instruments in practice and in research carries a significant respondent burden. In research, longer instruments also incur considerable data coding and data entry costs. Furthermore, because instruments may be time-bound, instrument psychometric properties should be reevaluated regularly to ensure relevance and soundness of psychometric properties. A shorter version of a well-used instrument to measure nurse burnout is suggested. This instrument may be useful for researcher use, for administrators who measure work-related burnout of nurse employees, and for nurses who complete surveys measuring burnout.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:49:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:49:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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