2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157381
Type:
Presentation
Title:
WORK SITUATIONS AND HOSPITAL NURSE INTENTION TO REMAIN EMPLOYED
Abstract:
WORK SITUATIONS AND HOSPITAL NURSE INTENTION TO REMAIN EMPLOYED
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Tourangeau, Ann E., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:130-155 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5T 1P8, Canada
Co-Authors:Mae Squires; Greta Cummings; Lisa Cranley
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purposes of this paper are to describe rates and differences in rates across generations of hospital about their intentions to remain employed, identification of work situations that entice them to remain employed and those work situations that encourage them to leave employment.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Despite current economic conditions, the global shortage of nurses persists. Promoting retention of current (and future) nurses is one important goal to minimize this shortage. It is reasonable to expect that nurses at different life stages (generational affiliation) have different rates of intention to remain employed and would identify different work situations that encourage them to remain in or leave employment.
METHODS: Based on previous focus group findings, 4,000 Canadian nurses responded to survey items asking them to rate their intentions to remain employed in both their current jobs and their current hospitals for four specific periods of time (one, two, five years; until retirement) and to identify work situations that encourage them to remain in (11 items) or leave employment (17 items). Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and chi square tests of difference were implemented as appropriate to report responses by generational affiliation and to test for differences in responses by generation.
RESULTS: Overall, the longer the period of time into the future, the less likely did all nurse generations intend to remain employed. There were significant differences (p<.001) in all eight intent to remain items across the three generations of nurses. The youngest generation consistently reported being less likely to remain employed than the other two generations. The three work situations that most strongly encouraged nurses to remain employed were reasonable workloads, manageable nurse-patient ratios, and supportive and empathetic managers. The three work situations that most strongly encouraged nurses to consider leaving employment were inadequate staffing, unmanageable workloads, and exhaustion. The strength of most factors influencing intention to remain in or leave employment varied significantly across generations.
IMPLICATIONS: Nurse intention to remain employed varies by generational affiliation. Furthermore, the strength of most work situations that encourage nurses to remain in or leave employment varies significantly by generational affiliation. These findings provide strong evidence of the need to tailor retention promotion incentives for each generation of nurses. Findings also provide knowledge about which incentives to remain employed are strongest and most relevant for each generation of nurses working in hospitals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWORK SITUATIONS AND HOSPITAL NURSE INTENTION TO REMAIN EMPLOYEDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157381-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">WORK SITUATIONS AND HOSPITAL NURSE INTENTION TO REMAIN EMPLOYED</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tourangeau, Ann E., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">130-155 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5T 1P8, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ann.tourangeau@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mae Squires; Greta Cummings; Lisa Cranley</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purposes of this paper are to describe rates and differences in rates across generations of hospital about their intentions to remain employed, identification of work situations that entice them to remain employed and those work situations that encourage them to leave employment. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Despite current economic conditions, the global shortage of nurses persists. Promoting retention of current (and future) nurses is one important goal to minimize this shortage. It is reasonable to expect that nurses at different life stages (generational affiliation) have different rates of intention to remain employed and would identify different work situations that encourage them to remain in or leave employment. <br/>METHODS: Based on previous focus group findings, 4,000 Canadian nurses responded to survey items asking them to rate their intentions to remain employed in both their current jobs and their current hospitals for four specific periods of time (one, two, five years; until retirement) and to identify work situations that encourage them to remain in (11 items) or leave employment (17 items). Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and chi square tests of difference were implemented as appropriate to report responses by generational affiliation and to test for differences in responses by generation.<br/>RESULTS: Overall, the longer the period of time into the future, the less likely did all nurse generations intend to remain employed. There were significant differences (p&lt;.001) in all eight intent to remain items across the three generations of nurses. The youngest generation consistently reported being less likely to remain employed than the other two generations. The three work situations that most strongly encouraged nurses to remain employed were reasonable workloads, manageable nurse-patient ratios, and supportive and empathetic managers. The three work situations that most strongly encouraged nurses to consider leaving employment were inadequate staffing, unmanageable workloads, and exhaustion. The strength of most factors influencing intention to remain in or leave employment varied significantly across generations. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Nurse intention to remain employed varies by generational affiliation. Furthermore, the strength of most work situations that encourage nurses to remain in or leave employment varies significantly by generational affiliation. These findings provide strong evidence of the need to tailor retention promotion incentives for each generation of nurses. Findings also provide knowledge about which incentives to remain employed are strongest and most relevant for each generation of nurses working in hospitals. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:49:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:49:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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