SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF FILIPINO IMMIGRANT WORKER MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157382
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF FILIPINO IMMIGRANT WORKER MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE
Abstract:
SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF FILIPINO IMMIGRANT WORKER MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun, PhD, ARNP, PMHCNS-BC
P.I. Institution Name:School of Nursing, University of Washington
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA
Co-Authors:Elaine Adams Thompson
PURPOSE: This study was designed to test a multi-dimensional model examining the effects of social discrimination, job concerns, and social support on Filipino immigrant workers' mental health problems and substance use, using data from the Filipino American Community Epidemiological Study (fACES).
BACKGROUND: Mental health problems and substance use are debilitating problems that are often experienced as co-occurring problems, with ramifying consequences on individuals, their families, and their work life and productivity. Researchers have examined the pervasive influence of social factors such as racism, socioeconomic position, social networks, and workplace on racial/ethnic health disparities - a growing concern of the United States and of the globe. However, mental health and substance use have received considerably less attention than physical health. This unique study addresses a striking gap in our health knowledge by examining the impact of social factors on a specific group of Asian immigrants, understudied and underrepresented in research.
METHODS: The analysis was based on a subset (n=1,397) of Filipino immigrants from the fACES sample identified as foreign born and employed at the time of interview. Mental health problems were indexed using items from the fACES dataset related to psychosocial distress, somatic symptoms and daily functions. Substance use was indexed by number of non-medical use of drugs, drug and alcohol abuse symptoms, and amount of alcohol consumption. Social discrimination was defined as unfair treatment and hassles experienced by individuals because of their social characteristics (e.g., skin color, accent, immigrant status). Job concerns referred to frequency of concerns related to immigration or immigrant status and concerns people typically have in work situations. Social support was defined as perceived support received from family/relatives and/or friends. Rated on Likert-type scales, high scores were indicative of higher levels of the variable of interest. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to specify the measurement model. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to estimate the full hypothesized model. Multiple general and specific fit indices were used to determine model fit.
RESULTS: The length of time study participants had been in the United States ranged from less than a year to 52 years (Mean=15.3, SD=10). Sixty-four percept (n=892) were naturalized US citizens. The majority (n=1,033, 73.9%) were proficient in English. The mean age was 42.7 years (SD=11.8); 60% (n=838) were female, 40% male. CFA indicated acceptable goodness-of-fit indices for a six-factor model and revealed satisfactory reliability. Mental health problems and substance use were positively correlated (r=.38, p=.05). SEM findings revealed support for the hypothesized model, particularly related to mental health. Social discrimination and general job concerns showed significant direct effects on mental health problems (b=.13 & .53, p=.05). Social factors were not directly linked to substance use.
IMPLICATIONS: This research uncovered new information about the impact of rarely studied social determinants on Filipino immigrant workersÆ mental health problems and substance use. This knowledge has contributed to model refinement and will allow specification of nursing interventions, program development, and policy decision likely to work for this vulnerable workforce population, reducing mental health disparities among Filipino immigrants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF FILIPINO IMMIGRANT WORKER MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157382-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF FILIPINO IMMIGRANT WORKER MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun, PhD, ARNP, PMHCNS-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jennyt@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elaine Adams Thompson</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: This study was designed to test a multi-dimensional model examining the effects of social discrimination, job concerns, and social support on Filipino immigrant workers' mental health problems and substance use, using data from the Filipino American Community Epidemiological Study (fACES).<br/>BACKGROUND: Mental health problems and substance use are debilitating problems that are often experienced as co-occurring problems, with ramifying consequences on individuals, their families, and their work life and productivity. Researchers have examined the pervasive influence of social factors such as racism, socioeconomic position, social networks, and workplace on racial/ethnic health disparities - a growing concern of the United States and of the globe. However, mental health and substance use have received considerably less attention than physical health. This unique study addresses a striking gap in our health knowledge by examining the impact of social factors on a specific group of Asian immigrants, understudied and underrepresented in research. <br/>METHODS: The analysis was based on a subset (n=1,397) of Filipino immigrants from the fACES sample identified as foreign born and employed at the time of interview. Mental health problems were indexed using items from the fACES dataset related to psychosocial distress, somatic symptoms and daily functions. Substance use was indexed by number of non-medical use of drugs, drug and alcohol abuse symptoms, and amount of alcohol consumption. Social discrimination was defined as unfair treatment and hassles experienced by individuals because of their social characteristics (e.g., skin color, accent, immigrant status). Job concerns referred to frequency of concerns related to immigration or immigrant status and concerns people typically have in work situations. Social support was defined as perceived support received from family/relatives and/or friends. Rated on Likert-type scales, high scores were indicative of higher levels of the variable of interest. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to specify the measurement model. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to estimate the full hypothesized model. Multiple general and specific fit indices were used to determine model fit.<br/>RESULTS: The length of time study participants had been in the United States ranged from less than a year to 52 years (Mean=15.3, SD=10). Sixty-four percept (n=892) were naturalized US citizens. The majority (n=1,033, 73.9%) were proficient in English. The mean age was 42.7 years (SD=11.8); 60% (n=838) were female, 40% male. CFA indicated acceptable goodness-of-fit indices for a six-factor model and revealed satisfactory reliability. Mental health problems and substance use were positively correlated (r=.38, p=.05). SEM findings revealed support for the hypothesized model, particularly related to mental health. Social discrimination and general job concerns showed significant direct effects on mental health problems (b=.13 &amp; .53, p=.05). Social factors were not directly linked to substance use.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: This research uncovered new information about the impact of rarely studied social determinants on Filipino immigrant workers&AElig; mental health problems and substance use. This knowledge has contributed to model refinement and will allow specification of nursing interventions, program development, and policy decision likely to work for this vulnerable workforce population, reducing mental health disparities among Filipino immigrants.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:49:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:49:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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