2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157386
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ME AND MY KIDS: A TRANSMETHODOLOGICAL STUDY OF WOMEN'S ADDICTION
Abstract:
ME AND MY KIDS: A TRANSMETHODOLOGICAL STUDY OF WOMEN'S ADDICTION
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Vandermause, Roxanne, PhD, CARN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University College of Nursing
Title:Assistant professor
Contact Address:103 E. Spokane Falls Blvd., Spokane, WA, 99005, USA
Co-Authors:Carrie Santucci; Pauline Sameshima; Sheila Kearney-Converse; Linda Kittell
ME AND MY KIDS: A TRANSMETHODOLOGICAL STUDY OF WOMEN'S ADDICTION
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this transmethodological exploration was to inspire nursing practitioners and educators to think about new ways to approach women in addiction, to stimulate thinking about relevant preventive interventions, and to raise awareness about addiction among diverse groups. Specific aims were to: 1) illuminate common experiences associated with the onset, duration and impetus for recovery in three women following their methamphetamine addiction, and 2) generate thematic and artistic interpretations that represent these common experiences in novel ways.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Methamphetamine (meth) addiction can produce devastating consequences to persons and communities. Women's addiction is particularly grievous because of the potential harm to children. This, along with the rising prevalence of meth use in women, prioritizes methamphetamine addiction among serious threats to the health of women and communities. National groups call for attention to prevention and treatment but community level receptivity and understanding is lacking. The voices of women who have experienced addiction and recovery are absent from many educational and social discourses. Blending the sciences and humanities in a novel project, this research resulted in new understandings about the experience of addiction and recovery unique to women. Such understandings can reshape practitioner and community responses. This presentation exemplifies a methodological approach that could be usefully applied to other complex, socially-embedded health care problems.
METHODS: This interpretive methodology, grounded in hermeneutic and arts-informed research methods, evolved from an interdisciplinary collaboration of scholars in Nursing, English, Teaching and Learning, Music, Visual and Performing Arts. Each discipline offered analytical input and guiding interpretive processes. This presentation focuses on the hermeneutic findings, presented as patterns and themes and augmented by artistic renderings, resulting from the analysis of repeated in-depth audiorecorded interviews with three women in recovery.
RESULTS: Hermeneutic analysis revealed the constitutive pattern "Me and My Kids", a compelling phenomenon that illuminated the addiction and recovery experience. Subsumed in this pattern were themes named "Making Sense" and "Making a Family". Struggles with personification of the drug, needing and creating protection, security, drama, and love, and breaking the generational cycle of addiction are demonstrated and explicated.
IMPLICATIONS: The effect of addiction on children is often described in a manner that stigmatizes women who suffer from addiction. When their narratives are artfully elicited and freely given, their perceptions and experiences surrounding their children are surprisingly revealing, casting new light on problems that nurses can impact through insight and demeanor.

Supported by American Nurses Association/American Nurses Foundation 2008 Presidential Scholar Award
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleME AND MY KIDS: A TRANSMETHODOLOGICAL STUDY OF WOMEN'S ADDICTIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157386-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ME AND MY KIDS: A TRANSMETHODOLOGICAL STUDY OF WOMEN'S ADDICTION</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vandermause, Roxanne, PhD, CARN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">103 E. Spokane Falls Blvd., Spokane, WA, 99005, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rvandermause@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carrie Santucci; Pauline Sameshima; Sheila Kearney-Converse; Linda Kittell</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">ME AND MY KIDS: A TRANSMETHODOLOGICAL STUDY OF WOMEN'S ADDICTION<br/> PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this transmethodological exploration was to inspire nursing practitioners and educators to think about new ways to approach women in addiction, to stimulate thinking about relevant preventive interventions, and to raise awareness about addiction among diverse groups. Specific aims were to: 1) illuminate common experiences associated with the onset, duration and impetus for recovery in three women following their methamphetamine addiction, and 2) generate thematic and artistic interpretations that represent these common experiences in novel ways.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Methamphetamine (meth) addiction can produce devastating consequences to persons and communities. Women's addiction is particularly grievous because of the potential harm to children. This, along with the rising prevalence of meth use in women, prioritizes methamphetamine addiction among serious threats to the health of women and communities. National groups call for attention to prevention and treatment but community level receptivity and understanding is lacking. The voices of women who have experienced addiction and recovery are absent from many educational and social discourses. Blending the sciences and humanities in a novel project, this research resulted in new understandings about the experience of addiction and recovery unique to women. Such understandings can reshape practitioner and community responses. This presentation exemplifies a methodological approach that could be usefully applied to other complex, socially-embedded health care problems.<br/>METHODS: This interpretive methodology, grounded in hermeneutic and arts-informed research methods, evolved from an interdisciplinary collaboration of scholars in Nursing, English, Teaching and Learning, Music, Visual and Performing Arts. Each discipline offered analytical input and guiding interpretive processes. This presentation focuses on the hermeneutic findings, presented as patterns and themes and augmented by artistic renderings, resulting from the analysis of repeated in-depth audiorecorded interviews with three women in recovery.<br/>RESULTS: Hermeneutic analysis revealed the constitutive pattern &quot;Me and My Kids&quot;, a compelling phenomenon that illuminated the addiction and recovery experience. Subsumed in this pattern were themes named &quot;Making Sense&quot; and &quot;Making a Family&quot;. Struggles with personification of the drug, needing and creating protection, security, drama, and love, and breaking the generational cycle of addiction are demonstrated and explicated. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: The effect of addiction on children is often described in a manner that stigmatizes women who suffer from addiction. When their narratives are artfully elicited and freely given, their perceptions and experiences surrounding their children are surprisingly revealing, casting new light on problems that nurses can impact through insight and demeanor.<br/> <br/>Supported by American Nurses Association/American Nurses Foundation 2008 Presidential Scholar Award<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:49:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:49:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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