URINARY F2 ISOPROSTANES: A BIOLOGICAL MARKER ASSOCIATED WITH COGNITIVE PROCESSES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157387
Type:
Presentation
Title:
URINARY F2 ISOPROSTANES: A BIOLOGICAL MARKER ASSOCIATED WITH COGNITIVE PROCESSES
Abstract:
URINARY F2 ISOPROSTANES: A BIOLOGICAL MARKER ASSOCIATED WITH COGNITIVE PROCESSES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Vidrine, Amy N., BS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Research Specialist
Contact Address:1305 N. Martin, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA
Co-Authors:Kathie C. Insel; David W. Montgomery
PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the association of a potential biological marker of age, urinary F2 isoprostanes, and cognitive processes known to decline with normal aging.
Rationale: While particular cognitive processes are known to decline with normal aging, for example, declines occur in executive function and working memory, there is great variability in the level and rate of decline among people of the same age. The high variability of decline in cognitive processes calls for improved ways to assess aging rather than the use of chronological age alone. We reasoned that a biological marker of aging would be a more robust indicator of cognitive aging than chronological age. Urinary isoprostanes are an indicator of systemic oxidative stress and because oxidative stress and the theory of free radicals are a leading theory of aging, urinary isoprostanes should be an indicator of aging processes including cognitive aging.
METHODS: Forty-two participants (M = 69 years of age) completed a 12-hour urine collection for urinary isoprostanes, which was used as an indicator of oxidative stress. Participants completed a battery of cognitive assessments.
RESULTS: Urinary isoprostanes were significantly and inversely associated with logical memory both immediate (r = -.38, p < .01) and delayed recall (r = -.42, p < .01), and recognition memory (r = -.42, p < .01) from the Wechsler Memory Scale III. Urinary isoprostanes were also associated with increased perseveration errors (r = .26, p < .05) and fewer categories achieved in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WSCT) (r = -.26, p < .01).
IMPLICATIONS: The free radical theory of aging suggests that oxidative stress accelerates aging implying that aging is not uniform among older adults since the formation of free radicals can differ depending on life circumstances. Since aging is associated with declines in particular cognitive processes it is important to look not only at chronological age, but also at biological age and the potential association between this biomarker of age and cognitive processes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleURINARY F2 ISOPROSTANES: A BIOLOGICAL MARKER ASSOCIATED WITH COGNITIVE PROCESSESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157387-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">URINARY F2 ISOPROSTANES: A BIOLOGICAL MARKER ASSOCIATED WITH COGNITIVE PROCESSES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vidrine, Amy N., BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1305 N. Martin, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">avidrine@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathie C. Insel; David W. Montgomery</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the association of a potential biological marker of age, urinary F2 isoprostanes, and cognitive processes known to decline with normal aging. <br/>Rationale: While particular cognitive processes are known to decline with normal aging, for example, declines occur in executive function and working memory, there is great variability in the level and rate of decline among people of the same age. The high variability of decline in cognitive processes calls for improved ways to assess aging rather than the use of chronological age alone. We reasoned that a biological marker of aging would be a more robust indicator of cognitive aging than chronological age. Urinary isoprostanes are an indicator of systemic oxidative stress and because oxidative stress and the theory of free radicals are a leading theory of aging, urinary isoprostanes should be an indicator of aging processes including cognitive aging. <br/>METHODS: Forty-two participants (M = 69 years of age) completed a 12-hour urine collection for urinary isoprostanes, which was used as an indicator of oxidative stress. Participants completed a battery of cognitive assessments. <br/>RESULTS: Urinary isoprostanes were significantly and inversely associated with logical memory both immediate (r = -.38, p &lt; .01) and delayed recall (r = -.42, p &lt; .01), and recognition memory (r = -.42, p &lt; .01) from the Wechsler Memory Scale III. Urinary isoprostanes were also associated with increased perseveration errors (r = .26, p &lt; .05) and fewer categories achieved in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WSCT) (r = -.26, p &lt; .01). <br/>IMPLICATIONS: The free radical theory of aging suggests that oxidative stress accelerates aging implying that aging is not uniform among older adults since the formation of free radicals can differ depending on life circumstances. Since aging is associated with declines in particular cognitive processes it is important to look not only at chronological age, but also at biological age and the potential association between this biomarker of age and cognitive processes.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:49:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:49:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.