2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157389
Type:
Presentation
Title:
GENE-NETWORKS OF HIV-RELATED FATIGUE IN CD14+ CELLS
Abstract:
GENE-NETWORKS OF HIV-RELATED FATIGUE IN CD14+ CELLS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Voss, Joachim G., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Co-Authors:Adrian Dobra; Caryn Morse; Joseph Kovacs; Larry Adams; Raghavan Raju; Marinos Dalakas
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between fatigue and genomic expression markers of mitochondrial dysfunction.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: HIV-related fatigue is multi-causal in origin and potentially related to mitochondrial dysfunction caused by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). CD14+ cells are undifferentiated macrophages, vulnerable to HIV infection, and easily accessible for gene expression experiments in a purified cell population. Identification of genes that will let us develop biomarkers for fatigue will aid developing diagnostic and progression measures.
METHODS: We utilized a novel mitochondrially-specific gene expression microarray to assess mitochondrial and nuclear genes in CD14+ cells of low and high fatigued HIV/AIDS patients (n=5 each).
RESULTS: Novel Bayesian and liquid association network METHODS: identified 33 genes predictive of low versus high fatigue and 32 genes predictive of healthy versus HIV infection. SULT2B1, a gene in the sulfotransferase family is relevant to both the cholesterol and testosterone pathway and like identified inner mitochondrial membrane genes predictive of fatigue status while outer mitochondrial membrane genes were predictive of HIV status. A surprising finding was that adenylate cyclase 2 (ADCY2) was a predictor of both HIV and fatigue, it had the highest KendallÆsTau association value in the HIV group but in reverse the lowest Tau value in the fatigue group.
IMPLICATIONS: Isolating CD14+ cells may provide an alternative to muscle biopsy and a minimally invasive way to study patient mitochondrial function, and Bayesian and network tools are useful to identify the link between subjective symptom perceptions and underlying biologically pathways. Fatigue status in HIV patients treated with NRTIs is linked to RNA expression related mitochondrial function. Additional studies are needed to confirm the relevance of our findings in other tissues (e. g. skeletal muscle) and to understand the significance of key genes such as SULT2B and ADCY2 in fatigue and HIV disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGENE-NETWORKS OF HIV-RELATED FATIGUE IN CD14+ CELLSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157389-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">GENE-NETWORKS OF HIV-RELATED FATIGUE IN CD14+ CELLS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Voss, Joachim G., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vossj@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Adrian Dobra; Caryn Morse; Joseph Kovacs; Larry Adams; Raghavan Raju; Marinos Dalakas</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between fatigue and genomic expression markers of mitochondrial dysfunction. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: HIV-related fatigue is multi-causal in origin and potentially related to mitochondrial dysfunction caused by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). CD14+ cells are undifferentiated macrophages, vulnerable to HIV infection, and easily accessible for gene expression experiments in a purified cell population. Identification of genes that will let us develop biomarkers for fatigue will aid developing diagnostic and progression measures.<br/>METHODS: We utilized a novel mitochondrially-specific gene expression microarray to assess mitochondrial and nuclear genes in CD14+ cells of low and high fatigued HIV/AIDS patients (n=5 each). <br/>RESULTS: Novel Bayesian and liquid association network METHODS: identified 33 genes predictive of low versus high fatigue and 32 genes predictive of healthy versus HIV infection. SULT2B1, a gene in the sulfotransferase family is relevant to both the cholesterol and testosterone pathway and like identified inner mitochondrial membrane genes predictive of fatigue status while outer mitochondrial membrane genes were predictive of HIV status. A surprising finding was that adenylate cyclase 2 (ADCY2) was a predictor of both HIV and fatigue, it had the highest Kendall&AElig;sTau association value in the HIV group but in reverse the lowest Tau value in the fatigue group. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Isolating CD14+ cells may provide an alternative to muscle biopsy and a minimally invasive way to study patient mitochondrial function, and Bayesian and network tools are useful to identify the link between subjective symptom perceptions and underlying biologically pathways. Fatigue status in HIV patients treated with NRTIs is linked to RNA expression related mitochondrial function. Additional studies are needed to confirm the relevance of our findings in other tissues (e. g. skeletal muscle) and to understand the significance of key genes such as SULT2B and ADCY2 in fatigue and HIV disease.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:49:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:49:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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