2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157391
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NEGOTIATING THE ROLE OF THE PROFESSIONAL NURSE: THE PEDAGOGY OF SIMULATION
Abstract:
NEGOTIATING THE ROLE OF THE PROFESSIONAL NURSE: THE PEDAGOGY OF SIMULATION
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Walton, Joni, PhD, RN, ACNS, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Carroll College
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:715 Getchell Street, Helena, MT, 59601, USA
RATIONALE: Simulation is the mainstay of laboratory education in health sciences, yet there is a void of pedagogy--the art and science of teaching. Nursing faculty do not have adequate evidence based resources related to how students learn through simulation.
AIMS: The research questions that were addressed were as follows: (a) how do students learn using simulation, (b) what is the process of learning with simulations from the students' perspective, (c) what faculty teaching styles promote learning, and (d) how can faculty support students during simulation?
METHOD: Grounded theory methodology was used to explore how senior baccalaureate nursing students learn using simulation. Sixteen nursing students who completed two semesters of simulation courses volunteered for in-depth audio taped interviews. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using classic grounded theory analysis by Glaser and Strauss. RESULTS: were validated by a focus group of senior students. The focus group identified supportive faculty traits or characteristics.
RESULTS: Negotiating the Role of the Professional Nurse was the core category, which included the following phases: (I) Feeling like an Imposter, (II) Trial and Error, (III) Taking it Seriously, (IV) Transference of Skills and Knowledge, and (V) Professionalization. Deescalating Anxiety, and Faculty Facilitating Learning were supporting categories of this study. Our study found that student nurses enter their educational process feeling disorganized, uncomfortable, and anxious. Simulation caused further anxiety and students were uncomfortable playing the role of the nurse. Early in the socialization process, students would fake the role of the nurse and decrease tension by joking around during simulation. Repetition and rehearsing the role of the nurse helped students gain confidence. Faculty who demonstrate patience and mastery, encouraged repetition, allowed mistakes, practiced with students, and provided positive feedback facilitated the process of negotiation the role of the professional nurse.
IMPLICATIONS: A conceptual model of this socialization process was developed and described in detail with supportive quotes. These findings provide a mid-range theory for the pedagogy of simulation and will help faculty gain insight and understanding of how students learn using simulation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNEGOTIATING THE ROLE OF THE PROFESSIONAL NURSE: THE PEDAGOGY OF SIMULATIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157391-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">NEGOTIATING THE ROLE OF THE PROFESSIONAL NURSE: THE PEDAGOGY OF SIMULATION</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walton, Joni, PhD, RN, ACNS, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Carroll College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">715 Getchell Street, Helena, MT, 59601, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jwalton@carroll.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">RATIONALE: Simulation is the mainstay of laboratory education in health sciences, yet there is a void of pedagogy--the art and science of teaching. Nursing faculty do not have adequate evidence based resources related to how students learn through simulation. <br/>AIMS: The research questions that were addressed were as follows: (a) how do students learn using simulation, (b) what is the process of learning with simulations from the students' perspective, (c) what faculty teaching styles promote learning, and (d) how can faculty support students during simulation? <br/>METHOD: Grounded theory methodology was used to explore how senior baccalaureate nursing students learn using simulation. Sixteen nursing students who completed two semesters of simulation courses volunteered for in-depth audio taped interviews. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using classic grounded theory analysis by Glaser and Strauss. RESULTS: were validated by a focus group of senior students. The focus group identified supportive faculty traits or characteristics. <br/>RESULTS: Negotiating the Role of the Professional Nurse was the core category, which included the following phases: (I) Feeling like an Imposter, (II) Trial and Error, (III) Taking it Seriously, (IV) Transference of Skills and Knowledge, and (V) Professionalization. Deescalating Anxiety, and Faculty Facilitating Learning were supporting categories of this study. Our study found that student nurses enter their educational process feeling disorganized, uncomfortable, and anxious. Simulation caused further anxiety and students were uncomfortable playing the role of the nurse. Early in the socialization process, students would fake the role of the nurse and decrease tension by joking around during simulation. Repetition and rehearsing the role of the nurse helped students gain confidence. Faculty who demonstrate patience and mastery, encouraged repetition, allowed mistakes, practiced with students, and provided positive feedback facilitated the process of negotiation the role of the professional nurse. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: A conceptual model of this socialization process was developed and described in detail with supportive quotes. These findings provide a mid-range theory for the pedagogy of simulation and will help faculty gain insight and understanding of how students learn using simulation.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:49:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:49:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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