2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157394
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SELF-REPORT OF NURSING LEADERSHIP PRACTICE AFTER COMPLETION OF TRAINING
Abstract:
SELF-REPORT OF NURSING LEADERSHIP PRACTICE AFTER COMPLETION OF TRAINING
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Wicker, Teri, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Yuma Regional Hospital
Title:Emergency Department Director
Contact Address:1885 South 37th Ave, Yuma, AZ, 85364, USA
PURPOSE/AIM: The purpose of this research was to examine whether frontline hospital-based acute care nurse leaders who had attended a leadership training program perceived their style of leading as containing behaviors representative of a transformational leadership style. A secondary purpose was to determine the participantÆs opinions about the value of a leadership program for their practice.
BACKGROUND: Numerous problems are associated with nursing frontline leadership roles including poor job descriptions, an increase in responsibility without an increase in authority, and - even more serious - a lack of education on how to lead others. Working as a nurse leader requires complex skills and competencies that could affect not only staff, but also patients. Without proper education, training, and mentoring, nurse leaders may struggle in their roles, which can contribute to decreased nurse satisfaction and poor patient outcomes. Education may be an important precursor to effective leadership and currently there remains limited evidence about the direct effect of leadership on patient outcomes, but there is growing evidence that leadership affects the work environment, which has the ability to affect outcomes.
METHODS: This study used a course evaluation and the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) to collect data related to frontline nurse leader's behavior after completing a leadership training program. A course evaluation was designed and utilized to gather information about the participant's perception of their leadership competencies, and the LPI measured perceived behaviors after completion of the Arizona Healthcare Leadership Academy (AzHCLA). Utilizing Survey Monkey, participants self-reported their perception on how frequently they used specific leadership practices.
RESULTS: A combination of a quantitative and qualitative approach was used to accurately collect and process the perceptions of frontline nurse leaders. Descriptive statistics were valuable in identifying mean score differences in how nurses perceived their individual competencies and behaviors. Participants also had the opportunity to describe any personal gains received by having completed leadership training.
The LPI and course evaluation surveys revealed study participants as perceiving positive outcomes related to gaining new skills after completing leadership training. Reported perceptions of competencies and behaviors indicated that educational programs can be beneficial to the improvement of leadership competencies. Qualitative data showed that course participants perceived having gained new leadership skills and behaviors related to leading others.
IMPLICATIONS: This research explores the connection between frontline leader's perception, competency, and practice of leading others. The data from this study has created a baseline of information regarding frontline nurse leader's perceptions of their competencies and behaviors related to their practice of leading others. Nursing administrators should use this information to better understand how frontline leaders perceive their roles and responsibilities. Educators should utilize results of this study to assist with identifying possible course objectives for new leadership courses and programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSELF-REPORT OF NURSING LEADERSHIP PRACTICE AFTER COMPLETION OF TRAININGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157394-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SELF-REPORT OF NURSING LEADERSHIP PRACTICE AFTER COMPLETION OF TRAINING</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wicker, Teri, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yuma Regional Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Emergency Department Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1885 South 37th Ave, Yuma, AZ, 85364, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">teriwicker@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIM: The purpose of this research was to examine whether frontline hospital-based acute care nurse leaders who had attended a leadership training program perceived their style of leading as containing behaviors representative of a transformational leadership style. A secondary purpose was to determine the participant&AElig;s opinions about the value of a leadership program for their practice. <br/>BACKGROUND: Numerous problems are associated with nursing frontline leadership roles including poor job descriptions, an increase in responsibility without an increase in authority, and - even more serious - a lack of education on how to lead others. Working as a nurse leader requires complex skills and competencies that could affect not only staff, but also patients. Without proper education, training, and mentoring, nurse leaders may struggle in their roles, which can contribute to decreased nurse satisfaction and poor patient outcomes. Education may be an important precursor to effective leadership and currently there remains limited evidence about the direct effect of leadership on patient outcomes, but there is growing evidence that leadership affects the work environment, which has the ability to affect outcomes. <br/>METHODS: This study used a course evaluation and the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) to collect data related to frontline nurse leader's behavior after completing a leadership training program. A course evaluation was designed and utilized to gather information about the participant's perception of their leadership competencies, and the LPI measured perceived behaviors after completion of the Arizona Healthcare Leadership Academy (AzHCLA). Utilizing Survey Monkey, participants self-reported their perception on how frequently they used specific leadership practices. <br/>RESULTS: A combination of a quantitative and qualitative approach was used to accurately collect and process the perceptions of frontline nurse leaders. Descriptive statistics were valuable in identifying mean score differences in how nurses perceived their individual competencies and behaviors. Participants also had the opportunity to describe any personal gains received by having completed leadership training. <br/>The LPI and course evaluation surveys revealed study participants as perceiving positive outcomes related to gaining new skills after completing leadership training. Reported perceptions of competencies and behaviors indicated that educational programs can be beneficial to the improvement of leadership competencies. Qualitative data showed that course participants perceived having gained new leadership skills and behaviors related to leading others. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: This research explores the connection between frontline leader's perception, competency, and practice of leading others. The data from this study has created a baseline of information regarding frontline nurse leader's perceptions of their competencies and behaviors related to their practice of leading others. Nursing administrators should use this information to better understand how frontline leaders perceive their roles and responsibilities. Educators should utilize results of this study to assist with identifying possible course objectives for new leadership courses and programs.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:50:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:50:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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