USING HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING TO STUDY ACUTE CARE NURSE RESPONSE DURING MOCK CODE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157395
Type:
Presentation
Title:
USING HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING TO STUDY ACUTE CARE NURSE RESPONSE DURING MOCK CODE
Abstract:
USING HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING TO STUDY ACUTE CARE NURSE RESPONSE DURING MOCK CODE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Wilson, Barbara, PhD, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd St., Phenix, AZ, 85004, USA
INTRODUCTION: It is known that effective nurse response in cardiac and respiratory codes are paramount to ensure patient safety and survival; and psychomotor training is a crucial component in obtaining and maintaining skill proficiency. Simulation training is an effective method to develop and reinforce psychomotor skills, although little is known about the role that human factors engineering (HFE) plays in refining the interactions between nursing personnel and hospital processes.
PURPOSE/STUDY OBJECTIVES: were to; (a) evaluate current hospital-wide code carts and process for responding to respiratory or cardiac arrests; (b) design and implement mock code training in acute care units using HFE; (c) evaluate how mock code training using HFE influenced the performance of nursing personnel; and (d) determine the characteristics of the nursing personnel for which simulation training was most beneficial.
RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: Several approaches have been used to evaluate staff response in cardiopulmonary and respiratory arrests, including 'traveling competencies' using cognitive, behavioral, and psychomotor skills; drills that focus on collaboration, teamwork, and communication; and the use of mannequins and simulations to create life-like environments, to name a few. Simulation training is gaining more prominence in healthcare (although long recognized and used in aviation), as it allows an interactive learning experience in a realistic training environment that poses no threat to patients.
A challenge for many hospitals is how best to incorporate the science of simulation training while taking into account the institutional processes that either prevent errors or contribute to the development of error. Human Factors Engineering (HFE), a relatively new area in healthcare research, refers to the roles that humans play in the development of error; specifically, the interaction between people and processes, devises, or technology.
METHODS: Using a prospective correlational design, selected staff demographics, type of mock code training, and comfort level in performing various roles in a code response were assessed pre (n = 129) and post (n = 48) mock code training using HFE in a 182 bed southwest community hospital. Twenty mock codes were conducted and assessed over a four month period on the day (0700 - 1900) and night (1900 - 0700) shifts on all inpatient units (excluding pediatrics), perioperative areas, and procedural units. Standard regression models and hierarchical regression models were employed to test relationships among identified variables.
RESULTS: The factors most significant in predicting how comfortable nursing personnel were in performing their role during a code situation were; (a) job title; (b) type of training received; (c) comfort level with Basic Life Support (BLS); and, (d) when the last live code they participated in occurred. Conducting mock code training on the home unit in an unoccupied room was viewed as 'helpful' ('4' on a 1-5 Likert scale) or 'very helpful' ('5') by 94% of the code respondents.
IMPLICATIONS: The type of training used during mock codes directly influences the comfort and knowledge of nursing personnel in performing their roles. Incorporating a systems approach using HFE provides a valuable framework in helping identify system barriers and establishing best-practice staff competencies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUSING HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING TO STUDY ACUTE CARE NURSE RESPONSE DURING MOCK CODEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157395-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">USING HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING TO STUDY ACUTE CARE NURSE RESPONSE DURING MOCK CODE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilson, Barbara, PhD, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd St., Phenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Barbara.L.Wilson@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">INTRODUCTION: It is known that effective nurse response in cardiac and respiratory codes are paramount to ensure patient safety and survival; and psychomotor training is a crucial component in obtaining and maintaining skill proficiency. Simulation training is an effective method to develop and reinforce psychomotor skills, although little is known about the role that human factors engineering (HFE) plays in refining the interactions between nursing personnel and hospital processes. <br/>PURPOSE/STUDY OBJECTIVES: were to; (a) evaluate current hospital-wide code carts and process for responding to respiratory or cardiac arrests; (b) design and implement mock code training in acute care units using HFE; (c) evaluate how mock code training using HFE influenced the performance of nursing personnel; and (d) determine the characteristics of the nursing personnel for which simulation training was most beneficial. <br/>RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: Several approaches have been used to evaluate staff response in cardiopulmonary and respiratory arrests, including 'traveling competencies' using cognitive, behavioral, and psychomotor skills; drills that focus on collaboration, teamwork, and communication; and the use of mannequins and simulations to create life-like environments, to name a few. Simulation training is gaining more prominence in healthcare (although long recognized and used in aviation), as it allows an interactive learning experience in a realistic training environment that poses no threat to patients. <br/>A challenge for many hospitals is how best to incorporate the science of simulation training while taking into account the institutional processes that either prevent errors or contribute to the development of error. Human Factors Engineering (HFE), a relatively new area in healthcare research, refers to the roles that humans play in the development of error; specifically, the interaction between people and processes, devises, or technology. <br/>METHODS: Using a prospective correlational design, selected staff demographics, type of mock code training, and comfort level in performing various roles in a code response were assessed pre (n = 129) and post (n = 48) mock code training using HFE in a 182 bed southwest community hospital. Twenty mock codes were conducted and assessed over a four month period on the day (0700 - 1900) and night (1900 - 0700) shifts on all inpatient units (excluding pediatrics), perioperative areas, and procedural units. Standard regression models and hierarchical regression models were employed to test relationships among identified variables. <br/>RESULTS: The factors most significant in predicting how comfortable nursing personnel were in performing their role during a code situation were; (a) job title; (b) type of training received; (c) comfort level with Basic Life Support (BLS); and, (d) when the last live code they participated in occurred. Conducting mock code training on the home unit in an unoccupied room was viewed as 'helpful' ('4' on a 1-5 Likert scale) or 'very helpful' ('5') by 94% of the code respondents. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: The type of training used during mock codes directly influences the comfort and knowledge of nursing personnel in performing their roles. Incorporating a systems approach using HFE provides a valuable framework in helping identify system barriers and establishing best-practice staff competencies.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:50:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:50:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.