BACK PAIN DURING THE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION: SEATTLE MIDLIFE WOMEN'S HEALTH STUDY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157397
Type:
Presentation
Title:
BACK PAIN DURING THE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION: SEATTLE MIDLIFE WOMEN'S HEALTH STUDY
Abstract:
BACK PAIN DURING THE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION: SEATTLE MIDLIFE WOMEN'S HEALTH STUDY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Woods, Nancy Fugate, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Professor
Contact Address:4525 E Laurel Dr NE, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA
Co-Authors:Ellen Sulllivan Mitchell
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose was to describe changes in levels of back pain during the MT stages and early PM, including effects of age, MT-related factors, symptoms (hot flash, sleep, mood), health-related factors, and stress-related factors.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Reports of increased prevalence of pain symptoms during the menopausal transition (MT) and early post menopause (PM) and after hormone therapy withdrawal suggest a potential role for endocrine changes in pain symptoms during midlife. To date there has been little focus on women's pain experiences during the menopausal transition.
METHODS:
A subset of Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study participants who provided data during the early reproductive, early and late menopausal transition stages or post menopause (N=292) including menstrual calendars for staging the MT, and annual health reports between 1990 and 2006, and morning urine samples assayed for estrone glucuronide (E1G), testosterone (T), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), cortisol and catecholamines was studied. Women rated their symptom severity in a health diary which they completed on multiple occasions each year. Multilevel modeling with an R program was used to test patterns of pain symptoms related to age, MT-related factors, symptoms, health-related and sociobehavioral factors with as many as 6812 observations. Age was centered at 47.4 years.
RESULTS:
Women experienced a slight nonsignificant rise in back pain with age and a significant increase in back pain during the early (p=.003) and late MT stage (p=.002) and early PM (p=.02), but urinary E1G, FSH, and T levels were unrelated. Women reporting higher perceived stress (p=.01) and those with lower overnight urinary cortisol levels reported more severe back pain (p<0.01), but history of sexual abuse and catecholamines did not have a significant effect. Those most troubled by symptoms of hot flashes, depressed mood, anxiety, night-time awakening, difficulty concentrating reported significantly greater back pain (all p<.0001). Women with better perceived health (<.0001), those with more formal education (p=.004), and those using hormone therapy (p<.0001) reported less severe back pain. Those exercising more (p=.005), using analgesics (p<.0001), and those with a greater BMI also had more severe back pain (p<.0001).
IMPLICATIONS:
Clinicians working with women traversing the menopausal transition should be aware that managing back pain symptoms among midlife women requires consideration of their changing biology as well as their ongoing life challenges and health-related behaviors.
Funding Sources: NINR R01-NR 04141; NINR P30 NR 04001.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBACK PAIN DURING THE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION: SEATTLE MIDLIFE WOMEN'S HEALTH STUDYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157397-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">BACK PAIN DURING THE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION: SEATTLE MIDLIFE WOMEN'S HEALTH STUDY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Woods, Nancy Fugate, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4525 E Laurel Dr NE, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nfwoods@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ellen Sulllivan Mitchell</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purpose was to describe changes in levels of back pain during the MT stages and early PM, including effects of age, MT-related factors, symptoms (hot flash, sleep, mood), health-related factors, and stress-related factors. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Reports of increased prevalence of pain symptoms during the menopausal transition (MT) and early post menopause (PM) and after hormone therapy withdrawal suggest a potential role for endocrine changes in pain symptoms during midlife. To date there has been little focus on women's pain experiences during the menopausal transition. <br/>METHODS: <br/>A subset of Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study participants who provided data during the early reproductive, early and late menopausal transition stages or post menopause (N=292) including menstrual calendars for staging the MT, and annual health reports between 1990 and 2006, and morning urine samples assayed for estrone glucuronide (E1G), testosterone (T), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), cortisol and catecholamines was studied. Women rated their symptom severity in a health diary which they completed on multiple occasions each year. Multilevel modeling with an R program was used to test patterns of pain symptoms related to age, MT-related factors, symptoms, health-related and sociobehavioral factors with as many as 6812 observations. Age was centered at 47.4 years.<br/>RESULTS: <br/>Women experienced a slight nonsignificant rise in back pain with age and a significant increase in back pain during the early (p=.003) and late MT stage (p=.002) and early PM (p=.02), but urinary E1G, FSH, and T levels were unrelated. Women reporting higher perceived stress (p=.01) and those with lower overnight urinary cortisol levels reported more severe back pain (p&lt;0.01), but history of sexual abuse and catecholamines did not have a significant effect. Those most troubled by symptoms of hot flashes, depressed mood, anxiety, night-time awakening, difficulty concentrating reported significantly greater back pain (all p&lt;.0001). Women with better perceived health (&lt;.0001), those with more formal education (p=.004), and those using hormone therapy (p&lt;.0001) reported less severe back pain. Those exercising more (p=.005), using analgesics (p&lt;.0001), and those with a greater BMI also had more severe back pain (p&lt;.0001). <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Clinicians working with women traversing the menopausal transition should be aware that managing back pain symptoms among midlife women requires consideration of their changing biology as well as their ongoing life challenges and health-related behaviors.<br/>Funding Sources: NINR R01-NR 04141; NINR P30 NR 04001.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:50:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:50:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.