2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157399
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EFFECTS OF SOCIOCULTURUAL COMMUNICATION WORKSHOPS ON INTERNATIONAL NURSES
Abstract:
EFFECTS OF SOCIOCULTURUAL COMMUNICATION WORKSHOPS ON INTERNATIONAL NURSES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Xu, Yu, PhD, RN, CTN, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Title:Professor/PhD Coordinator
Contact Address:4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Mail Box 453018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Co-Authors:Jay Shen; Anne Bolstad
PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of four socio-cultural workshops on communication competence offered to international nurses working in two community hospitals.
BACKGROUND: Communication has been cited as the top challenge for international nurses in the clinical setting. Communication not only includes linguistic competence but also socio-cultural competence. Speak for Success included a series of workshops on socio-cultural aspects of communicativeness as an intervention to enhance the overall communication competence of international nurses.
METHODS: Six variables were identified to encapsulate communication skills valued in nursing but not intuitive for international nurses: making eye contact, maintaining an appropriate distance from the patient, understanding American idioms, making small talk to establish rapport, listening without interruption, and summarizing message back for clarification. In addition, standardized patients (SP) scored their overall satisfaction with interactions with international nurses. Comparisons were made between the intervention and comparison groups, and the qualitative comments by standardized patients on international nursesÆ performance were analyzed. There were 18 in the intervention group and 10 in the comparison group.
RESULTS: For the variable making eye contact, international nurses in both groups demonstrated the skill 100% of the time. The intervention group demonstrated maintaining appropriate distance in the pre-test (100%) and post-test (94%) but the control group remained at 90%. Listening without interruption mean scores for the intervention group were 4.5 (pretest) and 4.7 (posttest) and comparison group mean scores 4.3 and 4.4, respectively. For summarized message back for clarification, the intervention group made notable improvement (pretest =3.9 and posttest =4.3). The scores for overall satisfaction were better than average in both groups and highest in the intervention group (pretest=4.2 and posttest=4.4). Scores for understanding American idioms are not reported here because there were too few cases. Qualitative analyses showed that SPs felt overwhelmingly positive about the personableness of all international nurses as noted their many caring behaviors. The intervention group showed noted improvement in using ôsmall talkö to establish rapport and touch to demonstrate support. Of concern, both groups showed a lack of assessment for pain on a 0-10 scale and addressing related concerns, e.g. stress.
IMPLICATIONS: Neither group seemed to show much differences in the pre- and post-test values of most variables. Since most participants had lived in the U.S. for a long time, they seemed well adjusted to the American culture. Similar programs would be more effective if offered to international nurses at the beginning of their sojourn in the U.S. Future studies are merited to compare international nurses with American nurses on the socio-cultural aspects of communication to examine possible differences in communication patterns and styles.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEFFECTS OF SOCIOCULTURUAL COMMUNICATION WORKSHOPS ON INTERNATIONAL NURSESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157399-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EFFECTS OF SOCIOCULTURUAL COMMUNICATION WORKSHOPS ON INTERNATIONAL NURSES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Xu, Yu, PhD, RN, CTN, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor/PhD Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Mail Box 453018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yu.xu@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jay Shen; Anne Bolstad</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of four socio-cultural workshops on communication competence offered to international nurses working in two community hospitals. <br/>BACKGROUND: Communication has been cited as the top challenge for international nurses in the clinical setting. Communication not only includes linguistic competence but also socio-cultural competence. Speak for Success included a series of workshops on socio-cultural aspects of communicativeness as an intervention to enhance the overall communication competence of international nurses. <br/>METHODS: Six variables were identified to encapsulate communication skills valued in nursing but not intuitive for international nurses: making eye contact, maintaining an appropriate distance from the patient, understanding American idioms, making small talk to establish rapport, listening without interruption, and summarizing message back for clarification. In addition, standardized patients (SP) scored their overall satisfaction with interactions with international nurses. Comparisons were made between the intervention and comparison groups, and the qualitative comments by standardized patients on international nurses&AElig; performance were analyzed. There were 18 in the intervention group and 10 in the comparison group. <br/>RESULTS: For the variable making eye contact, international nurses in both groups demonstrated the skill 100% of the time. The intervention group demonstrated maintaining appropriate distance in the pre-test (100%) and post-test (94%) but the control group remained at 90%. Listening without interruption mean scores for the intervention group were 4.5 (pretest) and 4.7 (posttest) and comparison group mean scores 4.3 and 4.4, respectively. For summarized message back for clarification, the intervention group made notable improvement (pretest =3.9 and posttest =4.3). The scores for overall satisfaction were better than average in both groups and highest in the intervention group (pretest=4.2 and posttest=4.4). Scores for understanding American idioms are not reported here because there were too few cases. Qualitative analyses showed that SPs felt overwhelmingly positive about the personableness of all international nurses as noted their many caring behaviors. The intervention group showed noted improvement in using &ocirc;small talk&ouml; to establish rapport and touch to demonstrate support. Of concern, both groups showed a lack of assessment for pain on a 0-10 scale and addressing related concerns, e.g. stress. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Neither group seemed to show much differences in the pre- and post-test values of most variables. Since most participants had lived in the U.S. for a long time, they seemed well adjusted to the American culture. Similar programs would be more effective if offered to international nurses at the beginning of their sojourn in the U.S. Future studies are merited to compare international nurses with American nurses on the socio-cultural aspects of communication to examine possible differences in communication patterns and styles.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:50:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:50:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.