2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157404
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family as context and concern in informal AIDS caregiving
Abstract:
Family as context and concern in informal AIDS caregiving
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:1995
Author:Budan, Linda, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health Sciences UnivSON
Title:Senior Research Associate
Contact Address:, Portland, OR, USA
Contact Telephone:
As the AIDS epidemic continues to expand, supporting the work of AIDS family caregivers will be an increasingly important aspect of professional care and cultural concern. The overall purpose of this study was to extend knowledge of informal family caregiving for persons with AIDS. This report draws from the findings of a phenomenological study to 1) describe and understand background context, caring practices and practical knowlege of AIDS family caregivers and 2) explore and describe family members' concerns and meanings related to AIDS caregiving. Ten male and eight female primary family caregivers from rural and urban settings were interviewed about their AIDS caregiving experiences. Participants were interviewed from 1 to 3 times between 6 and 24 months after the death of the person with AIDS. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used to explicate contexts, practices, meanings and concerns of family caregivers. Thematic analysis, exemplars and paradigm cases were the methodological approaches used during the iterative processes of reading texts, comparing cases, and writing interpretive commentary. Six patterns of family as both a context of care and a significant concern for primary caregivers emerged. These were: 1) involved families, 2) estranged families, 3) the reconciled family, 4) families in conflict, 5) families with children, and 6) disenfranchised caregivers. The disenfranchised were primary caregivers who, as friends to the person with AIDS, did not fit traditional definitions of family and who therefore had needs and roles that were not socially legitimized. Concerns about interactions between the family of choice and the family of origin were expressed by several caregivers. Children between the ages of 5 and 11 were participating in some family caregiving situations, which presented specific concerns for primary caregivers. This study contributes to the body of nursing knowledge by corroborating and extending prior work with AIDS family caregiving (Brown and Powell-Cope, 1991). Family caregivers have much to teach us about exemplary care as well as constraints to care. Nurses and others working in AIDS care are called upon to broaden their definition of family and deepen their understanding of the contexts and concerns of family care. Such understanding will enhance our ability to support, coach, and collaborate with families in similar situations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily as context and concern in informal AIDS caregivingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157404-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family as context and concern in informal AIDS caregiving</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Budan, Linda, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health Sciences UnivSON</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Portland, OR, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the AIDS epidemic continues to expand, supporting the work of AIDS family caregivers will be an increasingly important aspect of professional care and cultural concern. The overall purpose of this study was to extend knowledge of informal family caregiving for persons with AIDS. This report draws from the findings of a phenomenological study to 1) describe and understand background context, caring practices and practical knowlege of AIDS family caregivers and 2) explore and describe family members' concerns and meanings related to AIDS caregiving. Ten male and eight female primary family caregivers from rural and urban settings were interviewed about their AIDS caregiving experiences. Participants were interviewed from 1 to 3 times between 6 and 24 months after the death of the person with AIDS. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used to explicate contexts, practices, meanings and concerns of family caregivers. Thematic analysis, exemplars and paradigm cases were the methodological approaches used during the iterative processes of reading texts, comparing cases, and writing interpretive commentary. Six patterns of family as both a context of care and a significant concern for primary caregivers emerged. These were: 1) involved families, 2) estranged families, 3) the reconciled family, 4) families in conflict, 5) families with children, and 6) disenfranchised caregivers. The disenfranchised were primary caregivers who, as friends to the person with AIDS, did not fit traditional definitions of family and who therefore had needs and roles that were not socially legitimized. Concerns about interactions between the family of choice and the family of origin were expressed by several caregivers. Children between the ages of 5 and 11 were participating in some family caregiving situations, which presented specific concerns for primary caregivers. This study contributes to the body of nursing knowledge by corroborating and extending prior work with AIDS family caregiving (Brown and Powell-Cope, 1991). Family caregivers have much to teach us about exemplary care as well as constraints to care. Nurses and others working in AIDS care are called upon to broaden their definition of family and deepen their understanding of the contexts and concerns of family care. Such understanding will enhance our ability to support, coach, and collaborate with families in similar situations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:50:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:50:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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