2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157405
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Physical Activity Scale Development
Abstract:
Women's Physical Activity Scale Development
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Bryant, Joanne
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Contact Address:School of Nursing, PO Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA
Contact Telephone:206.543.4090
Significance: Physical inactivity is associated with increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and cancer. Yet midlife women in the US are not believed to be as physically active as needed to promote health. Development of a reliable, valid, and easily administered scale of physical activity for midlife women could improve our understanding of the interaction between midlife women's activity and health. Purpose: To develop a set of scales based on women's integrated activity patterns to guide women's physical activity interventions and research. Methods: A focus group was designed and led by five midlife doctoral students. Respondents, women 45 to 65, desired to return to their previously active lifestyles provided the concepts for items in the subsequent Barriers to Physical Activity scale. Barriers to Physical Activity is a nine-item scale and administered to 194 women in early 1999 in an annual mailed health questionnaire. Factor analysis and item-to-total correlation led to revisions of this scale and the addition of three new scales. The four scales were piloted with a group of midlife graduate students, then with a team of midlife coworkers in an industrial engineering site, guiding additions, deletions, rewording, and reformatting. Barriers & Supports, Physical Activity Level, Motivations, and Perceived Fitness were tested on 176 women (age 43-62) in early 2000 in an annual health questionnaire for a longitudinal study. Motivation consists of 11 yes/no questions. Barriers & Supports is a 28-item scale with yes/no responses for the presence/absence of each type of support followed by 5 scoring choices weighing impact of the support on the respondent's physical activity level. Physical Activity Level is a self-report of the current week's activities, with detail in the 2-4 MET range, including seasonal/intermittent activities. Difficulty interpreting responses to this scale has prevented data entry for analysis. Perceived Fitness is a 14-item scale with 5 response choices. Scale items with low item-to-total correlation were deleted, others were recoded so that high scores = high levels of physical activity or support for physical activity. Scales were correlated with women's mean minutes of non-work related exercise from diary entries made three evenings per month in 1999 (MEX99). Items included in the annual questionnaire for construct validation were Marcus' Stage of Change for Physical Activity (SoCPA), respondent self-rating for levels of general daily activity (GDA), 15 minutes exercise frequency (EX15), and overall physical activity level (PAL). Results: Internal consistency reliability measured by Cronbach's alpha: Barriers to Physical Activity a = .72, Motivation a = .85, Barriers and Supports a = .87, Perceived Fitness a = .86. Pearson's correlation with (MEX99) was significant at p<.001 for Barriers & Supports (r=.30), and Perceived Fitness (r=.34), but not significant for Motivation. Correlations with all remaining validation items were significant (r = .30 - .68) except for GDA by Motivation. Conclusion: Motivation scale will be modified to 5 scoring choices. Scales to measure current physical activity level will be created with focus on the 2-4 MET level and ease of scoring, and functional capacity will be added to create a complete physical activity index, to be tested November 2000 and retested two weeks later. Sensitivity of the index to changes related to physical activity and other therapeutic interventions will then be tested on women in 4 different quartiles of physical activity level who are participating in health or exercise related interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Physical Activity Scale Developmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157405-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Physical Activity Scale Development</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bryant, Joanne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, PO Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206.543.4090</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jpbryant@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significance: Physical inactivity is associated with increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and cancer. Yet midlife women in the US are not believed to be as physically active as needed to promote health. Development of a reliable, valid, and easily administered scale of physical activity for midlife women could improve our understanding of the interaction between midlife women's activity and health. Purpose: To develop a set of scales based on women's integrated activity patterns to guide women's physical activity interventions and research. Methods: A focus group was designed and led by five midlife doctoral students. Respondents, women 45 to 65, desired to return to their previously active lifestyles provided the concepts for items in the subsequent Barriers to Physical Activity scale. Barriers to Physical Activity is a nine-item scale and administered to 194 women in early 1999 in an annual mailed health questionnaire. Factor analysis and item-to-total correlation led to revisions of this scale and the addition of three new scales. The four scales were piloted with a group of midlife graduate students, then with a team of midlife coworkers in an industrial engineering site, guiding additions, deletions, rewording, and reformatting. Barriers &amp; Supports, Physical Activity Level, Motivations, and Perceived Fitness were tested on 176 women (age 43-62) in early 2000 in an annual health questionnaire for a longitudinal study. Motivation consists of 11 yes/no questions. Barriers &amp; Supports is a 28-item scale with yes/no responses for the presence/absence of each type of support followed by 5 scoring choices weighing impact of the support on the respondent's physical activity level. Physical Activity Level is a self-report of the current week's activities, with detail in the 2-4 MET range, including seasonal/intermittent activities. Difficulty interpreting responses to this scale has prevented data entry for analysis. Perceived Fitness is a 14-item scale with 5 response choices. Scale items with low item-to-total correlation were deleted, others were recoded so that high scores = high levels of physical activity or support for physical activity. Scales were correlated with women's mean minutes of non-work related exercise from diary entries made three evenings per month in 1999 (MEX99). Items included in the annual questionnaire for construct validation were Marcus' Stage of Change for Physical Activity (SoCPA), respondent self-rating for levels of general daily activity (GDA), 15 minutes exercise frequency (EX15), and overall physical activity level (PAL). Results: Internal consistency reliability measured by Cronbach's alpha: Barriers to Physical Activity a = .72, Motivation a = .85, Barriers and Supports a = .87, Perceived Fitness a = .86. Pearson's correlation with (MEX99) was significant at p&lt;.001 for Barriers &amp; Supports (r=.30), and Perceived Fitness (r=.34), but not significant for Motivation. Correlations with all remaining validation items were significant (r = .30 - .68) except for GDA by Motivation. Conclusion: Motivation scale will be modified to 5 scoring choices. Scales to measure current physical activity level will be created with focus on the 2-4 MET level and ease of scoring, and functional capacity will be added to create a complete physical activity index, to be tested November 2000 and retested two weeks later. Sensitivity of the index to changes related to physical activity and other therapeutic interventions will then be tested on women in 4 different quartiles of physical activity level who are participating in health or exercise related interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:50:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:50:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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