2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157406
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family functioning: How do family members view their family?
Abstract:
Family functioning: How do family members view their family?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Tsai, Jenny, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Contact Address:School of Nursing, PO Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA
Contact Telephone:206.685.0811
This paper reports on the preliminary findings of family members' ratings on three measures for family functioning: the Family APGAR Scale, the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale-II (FACES-II), and the Family Attitude Scale (FAS). Family functioning is a major outcome variable of the Family Centered Program for Adolescents with Mental Illness. Data included in this paper are baseline data (time 1) and data collected at the end of six weekly intervention sessions (time 2). The Family APGAR (Smilkstein, 1978, 1982) is a 5-item Likert-type scale rated on a 5-point response scale ranging from 0 (almost never) to 4 (almost always). Higher scores indicate higher levels of satisfaction of family members with their families meeting their needs. The FACES-II (Olson et al., 1985) is a 30-item Likert-type scale with a 5-point response scale ranging from 1 (almost never) to 5 (almost always). Higher scores indicate higher levels of perceived family adaptability and cohesion. FAS (Kavanagh et al., 1997) is a 30 item Likert-type scale with a 5 point response scale ranging from 0 (never) to 4 (every day). This scale collects information from family members on how they feel or think about the mentally ill adolescent and from the mentally ill adolescent about how s/he thinks other members' perceptions about and feelings towards her/him. Higher scores indicate higher levels of burden or criticism in the family associated with the mentally ill adolescent. All three scales are in the self-reported paper-and-pencil format. Participants with limited English proficiency may require assistance from qualified interpreters. There are 59 valid data sets from parents or other adult members (nP=33), mentally ill adolescents (nA=13), and siblings of the adolescents (nS=13) at time 1 and 52 sets (nP=29, nA=13, nS=10) at time 2. Internal consistency for each measure was tested with Cronbach's alphas with all three groups. The alphas ranged from .85 (APGAR of siblings at time 2) to .97 (FAS of parents at time 1). The mean APGAR scores are 13.58 (SDP=5.53), 9.38 (SDA=5.82), 12.08 (SDS=6.16) at time 1 and 14.00 (SDP=6.11), 11.85 (SDA=6.52), 10.20 (SDS=5.20) at time 2 for parents, adolescents, and siblings, respectively. With the same listing order, the mean FACES scores are 104.35 (SDP=19.57), 85.85 (SDA=22.39), 90.84 (SDS=21.07) at time 1, and 105.97 (SDP=18.50), 90.25 (SDA=16.00), 93. 61 (SDS=19.45) at time 2. The mean FAS scores are 46.06 (SDP=19.76), 48.57 (SDA=29.17), 48.64 (SDS=22.39) at time 1, and 39.44 (SDP=19.37), 51.97 (SDA=25.22), 54.02 (SDS=19.14) at time 2. Further analysis showed that parents' scores were significantly higher than adolescents' scores (p1=.024, p2 =.039) at both time points. No differences in other comparisons were detected at the .05 level. In summary, preliminary findings suggest that family members were similar in their perceptions about their families. The only exception was that parents viewed their family much more positive than the mentally ill adolescents in terms of how connected and flexible the family was. The patterns were similar at baseline and after completion of six weekly sessions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily functioning: How do family members view their family?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157406-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family functioning: How do family members view their family?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tsai, Jenny, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, PO Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206.685.0811</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jennyt@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This paper reports on the preliminary findings of family members' ratings on three measures for family functioning: the Family APGAR Scale, the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale-II (FACES-II), and the Family Attitude Scale (FAS). Family functioning is a major outcome variable of the Family Centered Program for Adolescents with Mental Illness. Data included in this paper are baseline data (time 1) and data collected at the end of six weekly intervention sessions (time 2). The Family APGAR (Smilkstein, 1978, 1982) is a 5-item Likert-type scale rated on a 5-point response scale ranging from 0 (almost never) to 4 (almost always). Higher scores indicate higher levels of satisfaction of family members with their families meeting their needs. The FACES-II (Olson et al., 1985) is a 30-item Likert-type scale with a 5-point response scale ranging from 1 (almost never) to 5 (almost always). Higher scores indicate higher levels of perceived family adaptability and cohesion. FAS (Kavanagh et al., 1997) is a 30 item Likert-type scale with a 5 point response scale ranging from 0 (never) to 4 (every day). This scale collects information from family members on how they feel or think about the mentally ill adolescent and from the mentally ill adolescent about how s/he thinks other members' perceptions about and feelings towards her/him. Higher scores indicate higher levels of burden or criticism in the family associated with the mentally ill adolescent. All three scales are in the self-reported paper-and-pencil format. Participants with limited English proficiency may require assistance from qualified interpreters. There are 59 valid data sets from parents or other adult members (nP=33), mentally ill adolescents (nA=13), and siblings of the adolescents (nS=13) at time 1 and 52 sets (nP=29, nA=13, nS=10) at time 2. Internal consistency for each measure was tested with Cronbach's alphas with all three groups. The alphas ranged from .85 (APGAR of siblings at time 2) to .97 (FAS of parents at time 1). The mean APGAR scores are 13.58 (SDP=5.53), 9.38 (SDA=5.82), 12.08 (SDS=6.16) at time 1 and 14.00 (SDP=6.11), 11.85 (SDA=6.52), 10.20 (SDS=5.20) at time 2 for parents, adolescents, and siblings, respectively. With the same listing order, the mean FACES scores are 104.35 (SDP=19.57), 85.85 (SDA=22.39), 90.84 (SDS=21.07) at time 1, and 105.97 (SDP=18.50), 90.25 (SDA=16.00), 93. 61 (SDS=19.45) at time 2. The mean FAS scores are 46.06 (SDP=19.76), 48.57 (SDA=29.17), 48.64 (SDS=22.39) at time 1, and 39.44 (SDP=19.37), 51.97 (SDA=25.22), 54.02 (SDS=19.14) at time 2. Further analysis showed that parents' scores were significantly higher than adolescents' scores (p1=.024, p2 =.039) at both time points. No differences in other comparisons were detected at the .05 level. In summary, preliminary findings suggest that family members were similar in their perceptions about their families. The only exception was that parents viewed their family much more positive than the mentally ill adolescents in terms of how connected and flexible the family was. The patterns were similar at baseline and after completion of six weekly sessions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:50:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:50:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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