Nursing leadership and the relationship to organizational commitment among nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157407
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing leadership and the relationship to organizational commitment among nurses
Abstract:
Nursing leadership and the relationship to organizational commitment among nurses
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Leach, Linda, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern California
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1540 Alcazar Street, CHP-222, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-9012, USA
Contact Telephone:323.442.2031
In the midst of dramatic changes, health care organizations need effective leaders who can lead change and navigate uncertainty in a way that is consistent with the values and goals of the caregiver. A key challenge for organizations as they respond to increased competitiveness, the work force demonstrates generational and cultural diversity, and the nature of work itself changes, is to maximize the contributions of all workers by cultivating their commitment. Problem Statement: Nurses work in demanding and cost constrained organizational environments. One problem is an inadequate understanding of how their commitment to an organization is affected by these changes as there is minimal information describing organizational commitment (OC) among nurses. Nurse leaders are in a position to influence commitment among nurses. Another problem is the aging RN workforce and a reduced supply of new and experienced nurses. OC is something to be nurtured and sustained as a competitive advantage, particularly since it is believed to be a more stable predictor of turnover, group performance and satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between leadership and OC among nurses in the context of profound organizational change. Theoretical Framework: Transformational leadership theory and Etzioni's theory of organizational involvement are the constructs upon which this study's theoretical framework rests. Transformational leadership theory (TFL) is a process where the leader inspires followers toward commitment and contribution beyond self-interest. TFL is a symbolic, expressive type of leadership, focused on vision and empowering others toward a collective purpose that generates change. Etzioni's analysis of organizations involves a leader's use of power (coercive, renumerative, normative) as an influence on follower involvement along three dimensions: 1) highly positive involvement called moral commitment, 2) moderately positive or negative involvement called calculative, and 3) highly negative involvement called alienative commitment. It is predicted that leadership based on symbolic communication and inspiring vision (normative power) influences the type of commitment among followers and is related to moral commitment. Sample: A randomized sample of 102 nurse executives (NE) participated in the study from acute care hospitals across the nation. Convenience samples of 148 nurse managers (NM) and 651 staff nurses (RN) complete the sample of participants. Methods: A cross-sectional, quantitative field survey of nurse executives, nurse managers, and staff nurses was conducted using the Transformational Leadership Profile and the Organizational Commitment Scale. Results: A negative association (r = -0.24; p < 0.05) between transformational leadership and alienative OC and between transactional leadership (r = -0.31; p < 0.01) and alienative OC was shown. Age, job tenure and experience were positively related to moral OC among nurses (r = 0.19 p < 0.05; r = 0.25 p< 0.001; r = 0.21 p < 0.01). A positive relationship between NE and NM transformational and transactional leadership scores was evident (r = 0.26 and r = 0.23; p < 0.05). Almost 70% of the nurses reported a high moral and high alienative commitment type. Conclusions: This study confirms that leadership of the NE has an effect on RN commitment despite role distance. Correlations such as these, that often range from 0.10 to 0.40 for psychological or social variables, support the notion that effective NE leadership diminishes angry, negative involvement by nurses in their organizations. Support for the influence of NE leadership on NM leadership was affirmed. That RNs and NMs report a dramatically different organizational commitment type than those reported in a study of non-nurses has significant implications for leaders to address the conflict nurses express by these results and for studying the influence of professional commitment on OC among RNs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing leadership and the relationship to organizational commitment among nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157407-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing leadership and the relationship to organizational commitment among nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leach, Linda, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern California</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1540 Alcazar Street, CHP-222, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-9012, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">323.442.2031</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">searle@hsc.usc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In the midst of dramatic changes, health care organizations need effective leaders who can lead change and navigate uncertainty in a way that is consistent with the values and goals of the caregiver. A key challenge for organizations as they respond to increased competitiveness, the work force demonstrates generational and cultural diversity, and the nature of work itself changes, is to maximize the contributions of all workers by cultivating their commitment. Problem Statement: Nurses work in demanding and cost constrained organizational environments. One problem is an inadequate understanding of how their commitment to an organization is affected by these changes as there is minimal information describing organizational commitment (OC) among nurses. Nurse leaders are in a position to influence commitment among nurses. Another problem is the aging RN workforce and a reduced supply of new and experienced nurses. OC is something to be nurtured and sustained as a competitive advantage, particularly since it is believed to be a more stable predictor of turnover, group performance and satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between leadership and OC among nurses in the context of profound organizational change. Theoretical Framework: Transformational leadership theory and Etzioni's theory of organizational involvement are the constructs upon which this study's theoretical framework rests. Transformational leadership theory (TFL) is a process where the leader inspires followers toward commitment and contribution beyond self-interest. TFL is a symbolic, expressive type of leadership, focused on vision and empowering others toward a collective purpose that generates change. Etzioni's analysis of organizations involves a leader's use of power (coercive, renumerative, normative) as an influence on follower involvement along three dimensions: 1) highly positive involvement called moral commitment, 2) moderately positive or negative involvement called calculative, and 3) highly negative involvement called alienative commitment. It is predicted that leadership based on symbolic communication and inspiring vision (normative power) influences the type of commitment among followers and is related to moral commitment. Sample: A randomized sample of 102 nurse executives (NE) participated in the study from acute care hospitals across the nation. Convenience samples of 148 nurse managers (NM) and 651 staff nurses (RN) complete the sample of participants. Methods: A cross-sectional, quantitative field survey of nurse executives, nurse managers, and staff nurses was conducted using the Transformational Leadership Profile and the Organizational Commitment Scale. Results: A negative association (r = -0.24; p &lt; 0.05) between transformational leadership and alienative OC and between transactional leadership (r = -0.31; p &lt; 0.01) and alienative OC was shown. Age, job tenure and experience were positively related to moral OC among nurses (r = 0.19 p &lt; 0.05; r = 0.25 p&lt; 0.001; r = 0.21 p &lt; 0.01). A positive relationship between NE and NM transformational and transactional leadership scores was evident (r = 0.26 and r = 0.23; p &lt; 0.05). Almost 70% of the nurses reported a high moral and high alienative commitment type. Conclusions: This study confirms that leadership of the NE has an effect on RN commitment despite role distance. Correlations such as these, that often range from 0.10 to 0.40 for psychological or social variables, support the notion that effective NE leadership diminishes angry, negative involvement by nurses in their organizations. Support for the influence of NE leadership on NM leadership was affirmed. That RNs and NMs report a dramatically different organizational commitment type than those reported in a study of non-nurses has significant implications for leaders to address the conflict nurses express by these results and for studying the influence of professional commitment on OC among RNs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:50:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:50:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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