2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157411
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Access to Care in Chronic Heart Disease: The Patient's Perspective
Abstract:
Access to Care in Chronic Heart Disease: The Patient's Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Winters, Charlene, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, United States
Contact Telephone:406-243-4608
Problem: More than 60 million Americans are now living with some form of chronic heart disease. In 1998 there were 62,606,000 physician office visits and 5,255,000 outpatient department visits by persons with a primary diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In rural communities, illness management can be complicated by environmental factors such as distance, weather, and transportation, availability of services, and characteristics of the populace. To better understand the illness experience of persons living in a rural Western state, three studies were conducted that explored patient and spouse perception of living with chronic heart disease. This paper will report findings that provide insight about how rural persons with heart disease access health care to manage their illness. Theoretical Framework/Conceptual Foundation: Qualitative inquiry was the methodological and philosophical approach used to guide each study. Description of Sample/Methods: Participants for all three studies were recruited from the offices of three cardiologists practicing in a rural Western state. In total, the purposive sample included 17 men and 10 women with chronic heart disease and 5 spouses (4 women and 1 man). Ages ranged from 38 to 88 years. Following informed consent, demographic data were collected and semi-structured interviews were conducted. All interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and analyzed for common themes using methods described by Miles and Huberman. Techniques used to ensure the trustworthiness of the qualitative data were based on criteria established for maintaining rigor in naturalistic inquiry. Results: Illness uncertainty, cautious trust of health care providers, a desire for self-care/self-reliance, the need for a consistent daily routine, and the participant's views of health within the context of chronic illness influenced illness management strategies pertaining to access to health care providers. The ability to recognize and respond to symptoms and the participant's need for support also influenced how these 32 people manage chronic heart disease. The common coping strategy of not thinking about the illness may also affect health care decisions made by patients and their spouses. Conclusions: Designing a plan of care that incorporates the values of self-care and self-reliance, on going assistance with symptom interpretation and coping skills is needed. A variable amount of support, education, and inclusion of spouses in the plan of care is recommended. Understanding how rural dwellers experience and manage chronic heart disease is essential to nurses' ability to formulate realistic goals and effective interventions that assist individuals to live better with illness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccess to Care in Chronic Heart Disease: The Patient's Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157411-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Access to Care in Chronic Heart Disease: The Patient's Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winters, Charlene, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, United States</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-4608</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">winters@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: More than 60 million Americans are now living with some form of chronic heart disease. In 1998 there were 62,606,000 physician office visits and 5,255,000 outpatient department visits by persons with a primary diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In rural communities, illness management can be complicated by environmental factors such as distance, weather, and transportation, availability of services, and characteristics of the populace. To better understand the illness experience of persons living in a rural Western state, three studies were conducted that explored patient and spouse perception of living with chronic heart disease. This paper will report findings that provide insight about how rural persons with heart disease access health care to manage their illness. Theoretical Framework/Conceptual Foundation: Qualitative inquiry was the methodological and philosophical approach used to guide each study. Description of Sample/Methods: Participants for all three studies were recruited from the offices of three cardiologists practicing in a rural Western state. In total, the purposive sample included 17 men and 10 women with chronic heart disease and 5 spouses (4 women and 1 man). Ages ranged from 38 to 88 years. Following informed consent, demographic data were collected and semi-structured interviews were conducted. All interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and analyzed for common themes using methods described by Miles and Huberman. Techniques used to ensure the trustworthiness of the qualitative data were based on criteria established for maintaining rigor in naturalistic inquiry. Results: Illness uncertainty, cautious trust of health care providers, a desire for self-care/self-reliance, the need for a consistent daily routine, and the participant's views of health within the context of chronic illness influenced illness management strategies pertaining to access to health care providers. The ability to recognize and respond to symptoms and the participant's need for support also influenced how these 32 people manage chronic heart disease. The common coping strategy of not thinking about the illness may also affect health care decisions made by patients and their spouses. Conclusions: Designing a plan of care that incorporates the values of self-care and self-reliance, on going assistance with symptom interpretation and coping skills is needed. A variable amount of support, education, and inclusion of spouses in the plan of care is recommended. Understanding how rural dwellers experience and manage chronic heart disease is essential to nurses' ability to formulate realistic goals and effective interventions that assist individuals to live better with illness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:50:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:50:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.