2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157412
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Korean American parenting, acculturation, and young adolescents' adjustment
Abstract:
Korean American parenting, acculturation, and young adolescents' adjustment
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Kim, Eunjung
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA
Contact Telephone:206.543.8246
The goal of this cross-sectional and correlational research study was to examine six factors that may contribute to psychological adjustment of young adolescents ages 11 to 14 in 92 Korean American (KA) families: maternal (a) rejection, (b) control, (c) integration, (d) assimilation, (e) separation, and (f) marginalization. This study was guided by Resiliency Model for Ethnic Minority Families (McCubbin, McCubbin, Thompson, & Thompson, 1995), Parental Acceptance-Rejection Theory (Rohner, 1991), and Multicultural Acculturation Framework (Berry, 1997). Healthy People 2000 /2010 sets goals of increasing interpersonal relationships of adolescents and eliminating health disparities of ethnic minorities (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1997, 2001). One ethnic minority, which has received little research attention, despite the fact that its numbers have increased rapidly during recent years, is KA families (Kim, 1998). Maintaining healthy psychological adjustment may be more complicated for KA adolescents than for American adolescents because of challenges to KA parenting. Kim and Choi (1994) stated that (a) KA families are influenced by two cultures and (b) acculturation occurs more slowly for KA mothers than for the young adolescents. Ninety-two KA mothers (mean age: 42 years) and their young adolescents (mean age: 12 years) in the Midwest participated in the study. Mean length of stay in America was 15 years for mothers and 11 years for young adolescents. Fifty-two percent of the families had annual incomes of more than $60,000. Self-report data was gathered for variables pertaining to mothers and young adolescents. The impact of maternal rejection and control on psychological adjustment was examined using Pearson correlation and multiple regressions. The moderation effect of maternal acculturation was tested using Baron and Kenny's (1986) regression strategy. Mothers' perception of maternal rejection and control did not predict their young adolescents' psychological adjustment. However, maternal integration and marginalization had a moderating effect between maternal rejection and control and adolescents' psychological adjustment. Maternal control had a greater impact on adolescents' healthy psychological adjustment when their mothers scored higher on integration. In contrast, maternal rejection had a greater negative impact on adolescents' psychological adjustment when their mothers scored higher on marginalization. The model explained 35% of the variance of adolescents' psychological adjustment. The findings indicate the importance of considering maternal acculturation when one examines young adolescents' psychological adjustment. It also indicates the necessity of developing intervention programs that include both a standard parenting training and bicultural effectiveness training for this ethnic minority.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKorean American parenting, acculturation, and young adolescents' adjustmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157412-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Korean American parenting, acculturation, and young adolescents' adjustment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, Eunjung</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206.543.8246</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eunjungk@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The goal of this cross-sectional and correlational research study was to examine six factors that may contribute to psychological adjustment of young adolescents ages 11 to 14 in 92 Korean American (KA) families: maternal (a) rejection, (b) control, (c) integration, (d) assimilation, (e) separation, and (f) marginalization. This study was guided by Resiliency Model for Ethnic Minority Families (McCubbin, McCubbin, Thompson, &amp; Thompson, 1995), Parental Acceptance-Rejection Theory (Rohner, 1991), and Multicultural Acculturation Framework (Berry, 1997). Healthy People 2000 /2010 sets goals of increasing interpersonal relationships of adolescents and eliminating health disparities of ethnic minorities (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1997, 2001). One ethnic minority, which has received little research attention, despite the fact that its numbers have increased rapidly during recent years, is KA families (Kim, 1998). Maintaining healthy psychological adjustment may be more complicated for KA adolescents than for American adolescents because of challenges to KA parenting. Kim and Choi (1994) stated that (a) KA families are influenced by two cultures and (b) acculturation occurs more slowly for KA mothers than for the young adolescents. Ninety-two KA mothers (mean age: 42 years) and their young adolescents (mean age: 12 years) in the Midwest participated in the study. Mean length of stay in America was 15 years for mothers and 11 years for young adolescents. Fifty-two percent of the families had annual incomes of more than $60,000. Self-report data was gathered for variables pertaining to mothers and young adolescents. The impact of maternal rejection and control on psychological adjustment was examined using Pearson correlation and multiple regressions. The moderation effect of maternal acculturation was tested using Baron and Kenny's (1986) regression strategy. Mothers' perception of maternal rejection and control did not predict their young adolescents' psychological adjustment. However, maternal integration and marginalization had a moderating effect between maternal rejection and control and adolescents' psychological adjustment. Maternal control had a greater impact on adolescents' healthy psychological adjustment when their mothers scored higher on integration. In contrast, maternal rejection had a greater negative impact on adolescents' psychological adjustment when their mothers scored higher on marginalization. The model explained 35% of the variance of adolescents' psychological adjustment. The findings indicate the importance of considering maternal acculturation when one examines young adolescents' psychological adjustment. It also indicates the necessity of developing intervention programs that include both a standard parenting training and bicultural effectiveness training for this ethnic minority.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:50:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:50:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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