Intensity and challenges as an aspect of work satisfaction in an urban emergency room

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157413
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intensity and challenges as an aspect of work satisfaction in an urban emergency room
Abstract:
Intensity and challenges as an aspect of work satisfaction in an urban emergency room
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Raingruber, Bonnie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Davis Medical Center, Room 4205, Center for Nursing Research, 2315 Stockton Boulevard, Sacramento, CA, 95817, USA
Contact Telephone:916.734.7850
Problem Statement: Identifying the sources of work satisfaction for emergency room nurses is vital if retention is to be maximized. Understanding the factors that contribute to work satisfaction is particularly important when serving patients with a varied spectrum of health problems during the midst of a nursing shortage. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the lived-experience of expert emergency room nurses in order to articulate their sources of work satisfaction. Conceptual Foundation: The Dreyfus model of developing skill acquisition and expertise was used as a conceptual framework for examining the lived experience of emergency room nurses. Sample and Methods: A phenomenological study of 13 emergency room nurses working in a large, urban hospital was completed. Each nurse had worked five or more years in the emergency room and was identified by his/her nurse manager as being clinically skilled. The researcher spent at least 5 hours observing the nurses in addition to interviewing each nurse. Participant's transcribed comments and field notes were interpreted using the methods of searching for paradigm cases, analysis of exemplars and identification of common threads of meaning. Research Findings: Experienced emergency room nurses described liking the intensity of working with complex patients with a variety of health problems. The nurses used a several terms to describe the fact that they enjoyed working in a fast paced environment. One nurse said it's like "being an air traffic controller because you have to be moving all the time while keeping track of what is happening." Other nurses commented, "I like it when things change quickly, it's like that battle cry, the British are coming, the British are coming." Nurses described liking to juggle several activities simultaneously and the challenge of never knowing who will be admitted next or how sick that person will be. Nurses described enjoying the chaos and acuity because "it creates focus and makes you think about what you are doing." One nurse described the fast pace as "exercise for the mind" capable of maintaining her interest. Conclusions and Implications: To retain skilled emergency room nurses it is important to determine whether the experiences the nurse believes are satisfying match the work environment. In a busy urban hospital that serves a population with complex medical issues it is critical that nurses enjoy the fast pace and challenges that enable them to learn on a continual basis. It is important for a nurse manager to be able to accurately assess whether the personality and interests of the nurse are suited to meeting the challenge of caring for patients with varied health problems and a lack of on-going primary health care. Allowing nurses to interview on the unit may be helpful in introducing them to the nature of a fast paces emergency unit and may promote long term retention of staff.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntensity and challenges as an aspect of work satisfaction in an urban emergency roomen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157413-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Intensity and challenges as an aspect of work satisfaction in an urban emergency room</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Raingruber, Bonnie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Davis Medical Center, Room 4205, Center for Nursing Research, 2315 Stockton Boulevard, Sacramento, CA, 95817, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">916.734.7850</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bonnie.raingruber@ucdmc.ucdavi</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: Identifying the sources of work satisfaction for emergency room nurses is vital if retention is to be maximized. Understanding the factors that contribute to work satisfaction is particularly important when serving patients with a varied spectrum of health problems during the midst of a nursing shortage. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the lived-experience of expert emergency room nurses in order to articulate their sources of work satisfaction. Conceptual Foundation: The Dreyfus model of developing skill acquisition and expertise was used as a conceptual framework for examining the lived experience of emergency room nurses. Sample and Methods: A phenomenological study of 13 emergency room nurses working in a large, urban hospital was completed. Each nurse had worked five or more years in the emergency room and was identified by his/her nurse manager as being clinically skilled. The researcher spent at least 5 hours observing the nurses in addition to interviewing each nurse. Participant's transcribed comments and field notes were interpreted using the methods of searching for paradigm cases, analysis of exemplars and identification of common threads of meaning. Research Findings: Experienced emergency room nurses described liking the intensity of working with complex patients with a variety of health problems. The nurses used a several terms to describe the fact that they enjoyed working in a fast paced environment. One nurse said it's like &quot;being an air traffic controller because you have to be moving all the time while keeping track of what is happening.&quot; Other nurses commented, &quot;I like it when things change quickly, it's like that battle cry, the British are coming, the British are coming.&quot; Nurses described liking to juggle several activities simultaneously and the challenge of never knowing who will be admitted next or how sick that person will be. Nurses described enjoying the chaos and acuity because &quot;it creates focus and makes you think about what you are doing.&quot; One nurse described the fast pace as &quot;exercise for the mind&quot; capable of maintaining her interest. Conclusions and Implications: To retain skilled emergency room nurses it is important to determine whether the experiences the nurse believes are satisfying match the work environment. In a busy urban hospital that serves a population with complex medical issues it is critical that nurses enjoy the fast pace and challenges that enable them to learn on a continual basis. It is important for a nurse manager to be able to accurately assess whether the personality and interests of the nurse are suited to meeting the challenge of caring for patients with varied health problems and a lack of on-going primary health care. Allowing nurses to interview on the unit may be helpful in introducing them to the nature of a fast paces emergency unit and may promote long term retention of staff.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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