2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157414
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace violence in female long-haul truckers
Abstract:
Workplace violence in female long-haul truckers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Anderson, Debra, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 315 HSLC, Lexington, KY, 40536-0232, USA
Contact Telephone:859.257.3410
Significance: An estimated 18,000 workers per week are the victims of non-fatal assault, while an average of 20 workers are murdered each week in the U. S. (NIOSH, 1996). An understanding of the prevalence of workplace violence in specific professions along with both profession-specific and gender-specific risk factors is necessary to facilitate the development of a comprehensive and effective approach to address this significant and multifaceted issue. This paper addresses workplace violence in the lives of female long-haul truckers. The U.S. truck driving industry employs 3.1 million long-haul truck drivers (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2001). Between 6 and 10% of those drivers are women (American Trucking Association, 1999; Renner, 1998) who are at risk for violence at the workplace. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of workplace violence, the types of violence, and the risks of exposure to violence that women experience as a result of being long-haul truckers. Conceptual foundation: The Iowa Report to the Nation on Workplace Violence (Loveless, 2001) was used as a guide to the types of violence experienced at the workplace. The types of violence are criminal intent, customer/client, worker-on worker, and personal relationship violence. Sample: Fifty female long-haul truck drivers were individually surveyed. Sixty-eight percent of the women drivers were between 30 and 50 years old; 47% were married; 38% had children < 18 years old; 56% were high school or GED graduates, and 42% had some college. Method: Data were collected at a national truck show in Boston, MA, using the Conflict Tactics Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Perception of Job Safety Scale. Findings: Forty-two percent of women reported some type of workplace violence while working as a long-haul trucker: 14% assault; 4% rape; 10% robbery; 35% truck vandalized. Sixty-six percent had felt unsafe while working during the previous year. In addition to the episodes of violence, respondents were asked about company policies related to workplace violence. Company policies were lacking in sexual harassment and violence prevention training and in reporting guidelines. Conclusions: Long-haul female truckers are at high risk for workplace violence. The workplace for these women often changes daily as a result of the nature of truck driving. The transience of the job keeps drivers away from their families, friends, and other support systems for long periods of time; thus their support networks are not within easy access (Renner, 1998). Safety measures at truck stops, rest areas, and delivery sites are needed to decrease workplace violence experienced by this occupational group. This study provided the necessary data for a national study (currently in progress) to document the incidence and distribution of work-place violence among female and male long-haul truckers in the United States.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorkplace violence in female long-haul truckersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157414-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Workplace violence in female long-haul truckers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Debra, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 315 HSLC, Lexington, KY, 40536-0232, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">859.257.3410</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">danders@pop.uky.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significance: An estimated 18,000 workers per week are the victims of non-fatal assault, while an average of 20 workers are murdered each week in the U. S. (NIOSH, 1996). An understanding of the prevalence of workplace violence in specific professions along with both profession-specific and gender-specific risk factors is necessary to facilitate the development of a comprehensive and effective approach to address this significant and multifaceted issue. This paper addresses workplace violence in the lives of female long-haul truckers. The U.S. truck driving industry employs 3.1 million long-haul truck drivers (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2001). Between 6 and 10% of those drivers are women (American Trucking Association, 1999; Renner, 1998) who are at risk for violence at the workplace. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of workplace violence, the types of violence, and the risks of exposure to violence that women experience as a result of being long-haul truckers. Conceptual foundation: The Iowa Report to the Nation on Workplace Violence (Loveless, 2001) was used as a guide to the types of violence experienced at the workplace. The types of violence are criminal intent, customer/client, worker-on worker, and personal relationship violence. Sample: Fifty female long-haul truck drivers were individually surveyed. Sixty-eight percent of the women drivers were between 30 and 50 years old; 47% were married; 38% had children &lt; 18 years old; 56% were high school or GED graduates, and 42% had some college. Method: Data were collected at a national truck show in Boston, MA, using the Conflict Tactics Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Perception of Job Safety Scale. Findings: Forty-two percent of women reported some type of workplace violence while working as a long-haul trucker: 14% assault; 4% rape; 10% robbery; 35% truck vandalized. Sixty-six percent had felt unsafe while working during the previous year. In addition to the episodes of violence, respondents were asked about company policies related to workplace violence. Company policies were lacking in sexual harassment and violence prevention training and in reporting guidelines. Conclusions: Long-haul female truckers are at high risk for workplace violence. The workplace for these women often changes daily as a result of the nature of truck driving. The transience of the job keeps drivers away from their families, friends, and other support systems for long periods of time; thus their support networks are not within easy access (Renner, 1998). Safety measures at truck stops, rest areas, and delivery sites are needed to decrease workplace violence experienced by this occupational group. This study provided the necessary data for a national study (currently in progress) to document the incidence and distribution of work-place violence among female and male long-haul truckers in the United States. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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